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What is the meaning of Paliativo? Concept, Definition of Paliativo

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Paliativo concepts and definitions

Paliativo definition

Palliative care are the attentions, care and medical treatments and pharmacological treatments that are given to patients in advanced stage and terminal illness in order to improve their quality of life and ensure that the patient is pain-free.

Definitions of palliative care

Definition of the European society of palliative care
"Palliative care are those attentions that are given to a patient with a life-threatening disease, at an advanced stage and which do not affect the healing treatments.
Definition of the National Cancer Institute (National Cancer Institute) of the United States
"Palliative care is the care provided to improve the quality of life of the patients in a serious or potentially fatal disease. The goal of palliative care is to prevent or treat as soon as possible the symptoms of a disease, side effects from the treatment of an illness and psychological, social, and spiritual problems related to a disease or its treatment. Also called care relief, medical care, support, and treatment of symptoms."1
"Palliative care is a concept of care to the patient that includes health professionals and volunteers who provide medical, psychological and spiritual support to terminally ill patients and their loved ones. Palliative care put the emphasis on the quality of life, i.e. in peace, comfort and dignity. One of the main goals of palliative care is the control of pain and other symptoms so the patient can remain as alert and comfortable as possible. Palliative care services are available to people who already cannot benefit from the healing treatments; the typical patient in palliative care has a prognosis of life of 6 months or less. Palliative care programs provide services in several situations: at home, Hospice, hospitals or trained to assist sick establishments. The families of patients are also an important focus of palliative care, and services are designed to provide them with the assistance and support they need."
WHO definition
"Palliative care are a way of dealing with advanced and incurable disease which aims to improve the quality of life both for patients facing a disease and their families, through the prevention and relief of suffering through an early diagnosis, proper evaluation and appropriate treatment of pain and other problems so much physical as psychosocial and spiritual.
The care, Hospice and by extension palliative care teams
• provide relief to the pain and other symptoms;
• defend life ("percussions" they are) but they contemplate death as a natural process;
• do not try to accelerate nor postpone death;
• incorporate the psychological and spiritual aspects in the patient care;
• provide support to help patients maintain until his death, within its limitations, the higher level of activity;
• offer your help to the family along in the disease process, and then, in the duel;
• work in teams to solve the needs of the patient and their families set included, when necessary, the bereavement support;
• not only are intended to improve the quality of life, but it can also influence positively in the course of the disease;
• apply early in the evolution of disease associated to other treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, aimed at prolonging survival, and also include studies aimed at understanding and more appropriately treat complications that affect the patient."

Paliativo concept

"Humanity has held since always of their dying, but palliative medicine, which has made it possible to professionalize what has normally done by them with abnegation and sacrifice, is relatively young. The modern palliative movement began with the opening of the St. Christopher's Hospice in London in 1960, to then be generalised to many countries since 1990 with the support of the World Health Organization and the emergence of numerous national associations and publications that have facilitated its wider dissemination and exercise.
What is palliative care?
Palliative care - according to the European society of palliative care - "are comprehensive given to patients with a progressive and advanced stage disease, potentially mortal in the short term and no longer responds to curative treatment and care total assets." Palliative medicine is the medical specialty devoted to the study and treatment of these patients. Its objectives are: maintain or improve their quality of life and to support their families in this phase and during the duel. Known also as intensive care of well-being, because they seek to provide everything that is able to reduce or prevent suffering to the dying person, either through media preventive, curative or rehabilitative, and even, sometimes, interventional therapies - for example, breathlessness by a pleural effusion drainage - without attempting to unnecessarily lengthen their survival.
Who is a patient at the end of life?
It is a person who has been diagnosed with certainty of an advanced, incurable, progressive condition, which does not respond to specific treatments and has a reduced life expectancy, generally less than 6 months. His treatment of base becomes palliative type.
Which patients should receive palliative care?
Although originally palliative care arose for cancer sufferers, by welfare that produce are used increasingly in other chronic diseases: heart disease, emphysema, ictus, cirrhosis, dementia, etc., because they share many common symptoms that may benefit from palliative therapeutic approach.
What are the goals of palliative care?
The final stage of the life of a patient is accompanied, in general, a great physical, emotional and social impact for the person concerned and his family, so that the basic goals of the mitigation are: the pursuit of their well-being through an appropriate treatment of pain and other symptoms, relief and prevention of suffering with the greatest respect for their dignity and autonomy and support his familyfor which better face up to the future death and mourning.
For the World Health Organization (who), (1990) the palliative treatment aims:
• "reaffirm the importance of life, considering death as a normal process
• establish a process that does not accelerate the arrival of death nor nor postpone it
• provide relief from pain and other distressing symptoms
• integrate the psychological and spiritual aspects of the patient's treatment
• offer a support system to help patients live a life more actively as possible until death and remains
• Offer a support system to the family so that it can deal with the disease of the patient and endure the period of mourning
Do what needs patients in the final stage of life?
They are very similar to a healthy person, perhaps more accentuated by the situation of special weakness or dependence causing them the disease.
• Physiological. Good symptomatic control.
• Membership. Be in safe hands. Feel useful. No experience being a burden.
• Love. Able to express affection and receive it.
• Understanding. Explanation of symptoms and disease. Opportunity to discuss the process of dying
• Acceptance. Whatever your mood and sociability.
• Self-esteem. Participate in decision making, especially when you increase their dependence on others. Opportunity to give and receive.
• Spiritual. Search for the meaning and purpose of life. Desire for reconciliation - forgiveness and affirmation of individual and common values
The complex needs of the patient and his family tend to be better resolved by the work of a multidisciplinary team consisting of doctors, nurses, social workers, psychotherapists, occupational therapists, psychologists, spiritual assistants, volunteers and experts in ethics and legal aspects. It is important that a common language is spoken among them and that there is a conspiracy of silence between the patient and his family.
There are three factors to successfully meet the needs of the patient:
• Explore how the patient feels his illness, their ideas and feelings about the problems and their expectations of the visit
• Try to understand the person globally in the context that surrounds it and the degree of family support has
• Find together, through good communication, what are your wishes, priorities and objectives of treatment and their possible participation

Paliativo definition

The goal of palliative care is helping a patient with a serious disease feel better. With them, they prevent or treat symptoms and side effects of disease and treatments. Palliative care also deal with emotional, social, spiritual and practical problems posed by the disease. When the patient feels better in these areas, it has a better quality of life.
Palliative care can provide at the same time that treatments intended to cure or treat disease. You can receive hospice care when the disease is diagnosed throughout the treatment, during control and at the end of life.
Palliative care can be offered to people with diseases such as cancer, heart disease, pulmonary disease, renal failure, dementia, HIV/AIDS and als (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis). You do not need to renounce your doctor or their treatments to receive palliative care.
Who provides palliative care?
Any health care professional can provide hospice care, but some specialize in them. Palliative care can provide a team of physicians, nurses, social workers, certified nutritionists, psychologists, massage therapists and chaplains.
Hospitals, home health care agencies, Oncology clinics and nursing clinics can offer palliative care. The physician or hospital can give you the names of specialists in palliative care near you.
The difference between palliative care and palliative treatment
Both palliative care and palliative Hospice provide well-being.
• Palliative care may begin at the time of diagnosis and may provide at the same time that treatment.
• Palliative Hospice begins when it is clear that the patient will not survive the disease, suspending this post-hospital treatment. Palliative treatment is normally offered only when you expect the person to live 6 months more or less time.
That include palliative care
A serious illness affects more than just the body. It impacts all areas of life and of the life of the family. Palliative care can address those aspects.
Physical problems. Some symptoms or side effects include headache, difficulty sleeping, difficulty breathing, loss of appetite and feel sick in the stomach. Treatments may include medications, nutrition, physiotherapy or integrative therapies.
Emotional, social and coping problems. Patients and family face stress during a disease that can cause fear, anxiety, hopelessness or depression.
• The members of the family can also take responsibility for providing care. Many members of the family also have work and other duties.
• Treatments may include counseling, support groups, family reunions or referrals to mental health professionals.
Practical problems. Some of the problems posed by a disease are practical, such as money problems or labour nature, concerns about security and legal matters. The palliative care team can:
• Explain the complex medical forms or help families understand treatment options.
• Provide or refer families to financial advice.
• Help connect with transport and accommodation resources.
Spiritual matters. When people are confronted by a disease, they may find a sense or questioning her faith. The palliative care team can help patients and their families to explore their beliefs and values so that they can come to acceptance and peace.
What to do
Tell the doctor what disturbs him most and what most concerns him. Tell the doctor what is important to you. From the doctor a copy of your living will or power for medical assistance.
Ask your doctor what palliative care services are available to you. Palliative care are almost always covered by health insurance, including Medicare or Medicaid. If you don't have health insurance, talk to a social worker or the financial advisor to the hospital.
Know your options. Read about documents in advance, decide with respect to the treatment that prolongs life and opt to not receive CPR (do not resuscitate orders).

Paliativo concept

Palliative is an adjective used to appoint what lessens, relieves or reduces the effects of something. To appeal to a palliative, the person seeks to soften or mitigate a consequence of something that, for one reason or another, cannot be deleted.
The most frequent use of this adjective is associated with lamedicina that is supplied to those who suffer unaenfermedad that can not cure, with the intention of slowing the progress of this and reduce the aches and pains that generates in the patient's body.
For example: "Doctor, not could a palliative to my mother? Complains much of pain","Rest assured that I will prescribe a palliative remedy","is a chronic disease that can be treated with palliative".
Referred to as palliative care, on the other hand, to medical care and enfermeriaque provides a person who suffers from a terminal disease. The intention of these care in minimizing the pain and increase the quality of life of the subject.
Develop palliative care when the patient's condition is irreversible, without this implying that they will stop him from practicing other treatments. Palliative care aims not only to the physical condition of the person, but they also look for work on supsicologia, social containment, etc. You can also orient to treat side effects of other procedures.
Palliative care typically involves working together between various specialists (doctors, nurses, etc.) and the patient's family to ensure comprehensive care.

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