Saturday, July 13, 2013

3.7 Underground river in Palawan

ADS

Underground river in Palawan (Philippines)



Review of this natural wonder

The Puerto Princesa subterranean River National Park is located in the island of Palawan, Philippines. This park combines a fantastic karst landscape of limestone with an underground river. One of the characteristics of the river is that it flows directly into the sea, and in its lower part is influenced by tides. The place is one of the most important forests in Asia. The park covers 5753 has and houses eleven different ecosystems, from a humid forest of the mountains to the ocean and reefs. Here there is also variety of endemic animals threatened, including pheasant, the Batwing Fox, Otter Aonyx cinerea, small pandas, the Civet and the Badger Mydaus javanensis. It was declared world heritage by Unesco in 1999. It was also declared one of the seven wonders of the natural world on November 11, 2011. The Park has a limestone Karst mountain landscape with 8.2 km of navigable underground river. A distinguishing feature of the river is that it winds through a cave before flowing directly into the South China Sea. It includes major formations of stalactites and stalagmites, and several large chambers. The lower part of the river is subject to tidal influences. Until the discovery of 2007 of an underground river in the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico, the Puerto Princesa underground river was reputed to be the world's longest underground river. The area also represents a habitat for the conservation of biodiversity. The site contains a mountain to the sea and the full ecosystem and has some of the most important forests in Asia. It was registered as world humanity heritage by UNESCO on December 4, 1999.

Geographical Aapectos

The Puerto Princesa subterranean River National Park is located in the island of Palawan, Philippines. This park combines a fantastic karst landscape of limestone with an underground river. One of the characteristics of the river is that it flows directly into the sea, and in its lower part is influenced by tides. The place is one of the most important forests in Asia.

The park covers 5753 has and houses eleven different ecosystems, from a humid forest of the mountains to the ocean and reefs. Here there is also variety of endemic animals threatened, including pheasant, the Batwing Fox, Otter Aonyx cinerea, small pandas, the Civet and the Badger Mydaus javanensis.

It was declared world heritage by Unesco in 1999. It was also declared one of the seven wonders of the natural world on November 11, 2011.

File:Sabang daylighthole.jpg

Geography

The Park has a limestone Karst mountain landscape with 8.2 km of navigable underground river. A distinguishing feature of the river is that it winds through a cave before flowing directly into the South China Sea. It includes major formations of stalactites and stalagmites, and several large chambers. The lower part of the river is subject to tidal influences. Until the discovery of 2007 of an underground river in the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico, the Puerto Princesa underground river was reputed to be the world's longest underground river. The area also represents a habitat for the conservation of biodiversity. The site contains a mountain to the sea and the full ecosystem and has some of the most important forests in Asia. It was registered as world humanity heritage by UNESCO on December 4, 1999.

Flora

The Park has a range of forest formations representing eight of the thirteen types of forests are in tropical Asia, namely forest over ultramafic soils, forests on limestone soils, montane forest, swamp forest freshwater lowland Evergreen rainforest, riverine forest, beach forest, and mangrove forest. Researchers have identified more than 800 species of plants of 300 genera and 100 families. These include at least 295 trees dominated by type of species Dipterocarps. In the lowland, large trees, such as the tao (Dao dracontomelon), ipil (Intsia bijuga), dita (Alstonia scholaris), amugis (Koordersiodendrum pinnatum), and Apitong (Dipterocarpus gracilis) are common. Forestry species include the bitaog (Calophyllum inophyllum), Pongamia pinnata and Erynthia orientalis. Other notable plant species include popping candy (Agathis philippinensis), kamagong (Diospyros pulganensis) pandan (Pandanus SP.) anibong, and rattan (Calamus sp. ))

Fauna

Birds constitute the largest group of vertebrates in the Park. Of 252 bird species known to occur in Palawan, a total of 165 species of birds recorded in the Park. This represents 67% of the total of birds and all 15 of Palawan endemic bird species. Notable species seen in the Park are blue nape Parrot (Lucionensis tanygnathus), Tabon Scrub birds (Megapodius cumunigii), Starling (Hill Myna) Hill, the Hornbill (Anthracoceros marchei) Palawan, chest White Sea Eagle (Leucogates halitutus )).
There are about 30 species of mammals have been recorded (Madulid, 1998). Most cases observed in the forest canopy and the power along the coast at low tide is the long-tailed Macaque (Macaca fascicularis), the only primate that exists in the area. Other species of mammals in the Park are the bearded pig (their barbatus), Bearcat (Binturong arctictis), Palawan stink Badger (Mydaus marchei) and the Palawan Porcupine (Hystrix pumilus ))
19 species of reptiles have been identified, of which eight are endemic (Madulid, 1998). Common species in the area are large predators like the common reticulated python (Python reticulatus), the monitor lizard (Varanus salvator) and Green Lizard (Bronchocoela cristatella) cresta. Amphibian fauna include ten species. The forests of the Philippines frog (Rana acanthi) is the most dominant and most common complications. A kind, busuangensis Barbourula, endemic to Palawan was also observed in the area.
Notable are the nine species of bats, two species of swifts and spider whip (Stygophrynus sp.) They found in the cave, and the cow (dugong) sea and hawksbill turtle (Chelonia mydas) that feed on the coastal area of the Park.


Going through the underground river in Puerto Princesa, Philippines



Parque Nacional del río subterráneo de Puerto Princesa

On the island of Palawan, in the Philippines, there is an underground river that flows into the sea and is surrounded by a jungle landscape considered one of the most important in Asia. For this reason, this territory was declared The Puerto Princesa subterranean River National Park.
In this ecosystem of sea and mountain, the great biological diversity and natural beauty are two great riches and a privileged ecotourism destination. This short River, subject to the influence of the tides, is located in a karst area with magnificent specimens of flora and fauna.
The Park has an area of 5753 hectares, and river runs along 8 km inside a cave in the South China Sea. Its charm and its natural value factors considered were re-appoint him Heritage in 1999.

The blue waters of this river are navigable and allow you to discover an underground world of limestone, with a cave full of stalactites and stalagmites. It is a true landscape of dreams, ideal for those wishing to enjoy a magic and unforgettable moment.
More than 800 species of plants have been identified by scholars of the Park, which include nearly 300 trees. Pheasants, Fox bats, otters, pandas, Civets and Badgers are some of the endangered endemic animal species that inhabit the Park.
Nothing less that eleven ecosystems coexist in these lands, including the rainforest in the mountains and the ocean reefs. In heaven, about 165 species of birds, among them can appreciate blue nape Parrot, Tabon scrub fowl and the Palawan Hornbill.
Craving for adventure travelers can also visit and climb Ugon Rock, the cave lion, Daylight hole and Kawili cave, some of the most stunning views, Park, and certainly unmissable.

Images of the Puerto Princesa underground river in Sabang (Palawan - Philippines)



 



Entrada


Cueva puerto princesa

Lago puerto princesa

El río subterráneo de Puerto Princesa El río subterráneo de Puerto Princesa


Empezando
La playa


Entrada

Entrada


Paisajes


Marea baja

Recommended content