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Theocratic Ministry School Week Starting july 14 ‒ Highlights of Leviticus 21-24

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Program of the Theocratic Ministry School: Week Starting july 14


ss14 pp. 1-4 Theocratic Ministry School Schedule for 2014
July 14 Bible reading: Leviticus 21-24
No. 1: Leviticus 23:1-14
No. 2: Universal Salvation Is Not Scriptural (rs p. 356 ¶3)
No. 3: Acceptable Time—Use Wisely the Opportune Season for God’s Favor (it-1 pp. 37-38)

w14 5/15 pp. 1-2 Table of Contents
JULY 14-20, 2014
Follow the Golden Rule in Your Ministry
PAGE 11 • SONGS: 73, 98

ws14 5/15 pp. 1-2 Table of Contents
JULY 14-20, 2014
Follow the Golden Rule in Your Ministry
PAGE 9 • SONGS: 73, 98


Highlights From the Book of Leviticus 21-24


Leviticus 21:1
*** w02 9/1 pp. 16-17 par. 15 “Without an Illustration He Would Not Speak to Them” ***
15 Something else is noteworthy about Jesus’ reference to the road that went “down from Jerusalem to Jericho.” According to the story, first a priest and then a Levite were also traveling that road—although neither stopped to help the victim. (Luke 10:31, 32) The priests served at the temple in Jerusalem, and the Levites assisted them. Many priests and Levites resided in Jericho when they were not working at the temple, for Jericho was only 14 miles [23 km] from Jerusalem. Hence, they undoubtedly had occasion to travel that road. Note, too, that the priest and the Levite were going along the road “from Jerusalem,” thus heading away from the temple. So no one could rightly justify the indifference of these men by saying, ‘They avoided the injured man because he appeared to be dead, and touching a corpse would have made them temporarily unfit to serve at the temple.’ (Leviticus 21:1; Numbers 19:11, 16) Is it not clear that Jesus’ illustration reflected things that were familiar to his listeners?

Leviticus 21:12
*** w01 2/1 p. 14 par. 2 Are You Living Up to Your Dedication? ***
2 However, what does “dedication” mean in the Biblical sense? “Dedicate” translates a Hebrew verb that has the meaning “keep separate; be separated; withdraw.” In ancient Israel, High Priest Aaron wore on his turban “the holy sign of dedication,” which was a shining plate of pure gold engraved with the Hebrew words for “Holiness belongs to Jehovah.” That served as a reminder to the high priest that he must avoid doing anything that would profane the sanctuary “because the sign of dedication, the anointing oil of his God, [was] upon him.”—Exodus 29:6; 39:30; Leviticus 21:12.

Leviticus 22:17-20
*** w02 5/1 p. 13 Meeting Divine Requirements Magnifies Jehovah ***
Each Must Render an Account
17 Individuals living in Malachi’s day bore personal responsibility for their deeds, and so do we. (Romans 14:12; Galatians 6:5) Accordingly, Malachi 1:14 states: “Cursed is the one acting cunningly when there exists in his drove [an unblemished] male animal, and he is making a vow and sacrificing a ruined one to Jehovah.” A man who had a drove did not own just a single animal—say, just one sheep—so that he had no choice. In selecting an animal for sacrifice, he did not have to choose one that was blind, lame, or sick. If he did choose such a defective creature, it would show that he despised Jehovah’s sacrificial arrangement, for a man who had a drove of animals could surely find one that did not have such defects!
18 With good reason, then, Jehovah cursed the one acting cunningly, the one who had a suitable male animal but who brought—perhaps had to drag—a blind, lame, or sick creature to the priest for sacrifice. Yet, there is not even a hint that any of the priests quoted God’s law that defective animals were not acceptable. (Leviticus 22:17-20) Reasonable individuals knew that they would have fared badly if they had tried to foist such a gift on their governor. But in reality they were dealing with the Universal Sovereign, Jehovah, who is far, far greater than any human governor. Malachi 1:14 states matters this way: “‘I am a great King,’ Jehovah of armies has said, ‘and my name will be fear-inspiring among the nations.’”

Lev. 22:18-20
*** w13 12/15 p. 13 par. 6 Will You Make Sacrifices for the Kingdom? ***
6 First, the person had to give his best. Jehovah told the nation that any offering had to be a sound one in order “to gain approval.” (Lev. 22:18-20) If there was a defect in the animal, it would not be viewed as an acceptable sacrifice to Jehovah. Second, the person giving the sacrifice had to be clean and undefiled. If a person was in an unclean state, he would have to make a sin offering or a guilt offering to restore his standing with Jehovah before making a voluntary offering. (Lev. 5:5, 6, 15) This was a serious matter. Jehovah stipulated that if someone in an unclean state partook of a communion sacrifice, which included voluntary offerings, he would be cut off from God’s people. (Lev. 7:20, 21) On the other hand, when the person making the sacrifice had a good standing with Jehovah and the offering was without defect, the giver could rejoice with satisfaction.—Read 1 Chronicles 29:9.

Leviticus 22:19, 20
*** w08 12/15 p. 3 Why Keep Your Integrity? ***
What Is Integrity?
4 Many people seem to have a hazy idea of what integrity is. For example, when politicians boast of their integrity, they often seem to mean honesty. That quality is important, but it is only a part of integrity. As used in the Bible, integrity involves moral completeness, soundness. The Hebrew words relating to “integrity” come from a root meaning sound, whole, or faultless. One of these words is used regarding the sacrifices to be offered to Jehovah. An animal for sacrifice gained his approval only if it was sound, or whole. (Read Leviticus 22:19, 20.) Jehovah strongly censured those who flouted his direction by offering lame, sick, or blind animals for sacrifice.—Mal. 1:6-8.

Lev. 22:20-22
*** w12 1/15 pp. 17-18 Learn From ‘the Framework of Truth’ ***
THE SPIRIT BEHIND THE SACRIFICE
6 A fundamental standard concerning any animal that was to be sacrificed to Jehovah was that it be “sound” in all respects—not blind, injured, deformed, or sick. (Lev. 22:20-22) When the Israelites offered fruits or grains to Jehovah, they needed to be the “firstfruits,” “the very best” of their harvests. (Num. 18:12, 29) A second-rate offering was not acceptable to Jehovah. The important requirement regarding animal sacrifices pictured that Jesus’ sacrifice would be spotless and unblemished and that Jehovah would sacrifice what was best and dearest to him in order to redeem mankind.—1 Pet. 1:18, 19.
7 If the person making a sacrifice was truly grateful to Jehovah for all of His goodness, then would he not be happy to select the very best that he possessed? The quality of the offering was left up to the individual. However, he knew that God would not be pleased with a defective offering because that would indicate that the man considered the sacrifice a mere formality, even a burden. (Read Malachi 1:6-8, 13.) This should make us reflect on our service to God: ‘With what spirit am I serving Jehovah? Might it be appropriate for me to review the quality of my service and my motives for serving him?’

Lev. 22:29
*** w11 2/15 p. 15 Gaining God’s Approval Leads to Everlasting Life ***
Sacrifices That Meet With God’s Approval
11 Under the Law covenant, God’s people offered acceptable sacrifices to gain his favor. “In case you should sacrifice a communion sacrifice to Jehovah,” says Leviticus 19:5, “you should sacrifice it to gain approval for yourselves.” In the same Bible book, we read: “In case you should sacrifice a thanksgiving sacrifice to Jehovah, you should sacrifice it to gain approval for you.” (Lev. 22:29) When the Israelites offered up proper animal sacrifices on Jehovah’s altar, the smoke that drifted up was like “a restful odor” to the true God. (Lev. 1:9, 13) He felt soothed and refreshed by those expressions of love from his people. (Gen. 8:21, ftn.) In these features of the Law, we find a principle that applies today. Those offering acceptable sacrifices to Jehovah receive his approval. What sacrifices does he accept? Consider two areas of life: our conduct and our speech.

Leviticus 23:2, 3, 36, 37
*** w06 11/1 p. 27 par. 3 Showing Respect for Our Sacred Gatherings ***
3 The Israelites assembled regularly to worship Jehovah and to listen to the reading of his Law. Certain days of their festivals were called holy conventions or solemn assemblies, indicating the sacred nature of these gatherings. (Leviticus 23:2, 3, 36, 37) At a public assembly in the days of Ezra and Nehemiah, the Levites “were explaining the law to the people.” Since “all the people were weeping as they were hearing the words of the law,” the Levites “were ordering all the people to be silent, saying: ‘Keep quiet! for this day is holy.’” The Israelites then celebrated the seven-day Festival of Booths with “very great rejoicing.” Furthermore, “there was a reading aloud of the book of the law of the true God day by day, from the first day until the last day; and they went on holding the festival seven days, and on the eighth day there was a solemn assembly, according to the rule.” (Nehemiah 8:7-11, 17, 18) These were truly holy occasions requiring respectful attention on the part of those in attendance.


*** w05 5/15 p. 23 par. 14 Coming to Know Jehovah’s Ways ***
14 Give priority to spiritual matters. The nation of Israel was not to allow caring for physical needs to crowd out attention given to spiritual activities. The Israelites’ lives were not to be devoted solely to mundane pursuits. Jehovah set aside time each week that he designated as sacred, time used exclusively for activity related to worship of the true God. (Exodus 35:1-3; Numbers 15:32-36) Each year, additional time was to be set aside for specified holy conventions. (Leviticus 23:4-44) These would provide opportunities to recount Jehovah’s mighty acts, to be reminded of his ways, and to express gratitude to him for all of his goodness. As the people expressed their devotion to Jehovah, they would grow in godly fear and love and would be helped to walk in his ways. (Deuteronomy 10:12, 13) The wholesome principles embodied in those instructions benefit Jehovah’s servants today.—Hebrews 10:24, 25.

Leviticus 23:4-44
*** w05 5/15 p. 23 par. 14 Coming to Know Jehovah’s Ways ***
14 Give priority to spiritual matters. The nation of Israel was not to allow caring for physical needs to crowd out attention given to spiritual activities. The Israelites’ lives were not to be devoted solely to mundane pursuits. Jehovah set aside time each week that he designated as sacred, time used exclusively for activity related to worship of the true God. (Exodus 35:1-3; Numbers 15:32-36) Each year, additional time was to be set aside for specified holy conventions. (Leviticus 23:4-44) These would provide opportunities to recount Jehovah’s mighty acts, to be reminded of his ways, and to express gratitude to him for all of his goodness. As the people expressed their devotion to Jehovah, they would grow in godly fear and love and would be helped to walk in his ways. (Deuteronomy 10:12, 13) The wholesome principles embodied in those instructions benefit Jehovah’s servants today.—Hebrews 10:24, 25.

Leviticus 23:5
*** w03 2/15 p. 14 par. 10 Why Observe the Lord’s Evening Meal? ***
10 Should Jesus’ death be commemorated monthly, weekly, or even daily? No. Jesus instituted the Lord’s Evening Meal and was killed on the day of Passover, which was observed “as a memorial” of Israel’s deliverance from Egyptian bondage in 1513 B.C.E. (Exodus 12:14) The Passover was held only once a year, on the 14th day of the Jewish month Nisan. (Exodus 12:1-6; Leviticus 23:5) This indicates that Jesus’ death should be commemorated only as often as the Passover—annually—not monthly, weekly, or daily.

Lev. 23:5-7
*** w13 12/15 p. 19 par. 11 ‘This Is to Be a Memorial for You’ ***
11 We thus have reason to ask, What of the Passover in 33 C.E.? Well, on Nisan 13, as the day drew near ‘on which the passover victim was to be sacrificed,’ Christ told Peter and John: “Go and get the passover ready for us to eat.” (Luke 22:7, 8) “At length . . . the hour came” for the Passover meal, after sunset on Nisan 14, which would be Thursday evening. Jesus ate that meal with his apostles, and then he instituted the Lord’s Evening Meal. (Luke 22:14, 15) That night he was arrested and tried. Jesus was impaled close to noon on Nisan 14, and that afternoon he died. (John 19:14) Thus, “Christ our passover [was] sacrificed” on the same day as the Passover lamb was slaughtered. (1 Cor. 5:7; 11:23; Matt. 26:2) As the end of that Jewish day approached, Jesus was buried—before the start of Nisan 15.—Lev. 23:5-7; Luke 23:54.

Leviticus 23:6-14
*** w07 1/1 p. 21 “You Must Become Nothing but Joyful” ***
‘The Firstfruits of the Dead’
5 On the third day, Jesus was raised back to life in order to present the value of his sacrifice to his Father. (Hebrews 9:24) His resurrection was foreshadowed during another festival. The day after Nisan 14 saw the beginning of the Festival of Unfermented Cakes. On the next day, Nisan 16, Israelites brought a sheaf of the firstfruits of the barley harvest, the earliest harvest in Israel, for the priest to wave before Jehovah. (Leviticus 23:6-14) How appropriate that in the year 33 C.E., on that very day, Jehovah thwarted Satan’s vicious efforts to silence forever his “faithful and true witness”! On Nisan 16, 33 C.E., Jehovah resurrected Jesus from the dead to immortal spirit life.—Revelation 3:14; 1 Peter 3:18.
6 Jesus became “the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep in death.” (1 Corinthians 15:20) Unlike those who had been resurrected before, Jesus did not die again. Rather, he ascended to heaven to Jehovah’s right hand, where he waited until he would be installed as King of Jehovah’s heavenly Kingdom. (Psalm 110:1; Acts 2:32, 33; Hebrews 10:12, 13) Since his installment as King, Jesus is now in a position to bruise the great enemy, Satan, in the head permanently and to destroy his seed.—Revelation 11:15, 18; 20:1-3, 10.

Leviticus 23:9-14
*** w00 7/15 pp. 13-14 The Resurrection Hope Is Sure! ***
Testimony From the Law and the Psalms
17 Paul’s resurrection hope was in harmony with “things set forth in the Law.” God told the Israelites: “You must . . . bring a sheaf of the firstfruits of your harvest to the priest. And [on Nisan 16] he must wave the sheaf to and fro before Jehovah to gain approval for you.” (Leviticus 23:9-14) Perhaps with this law in mind, Paul wrote: “Christ has been raised up from the dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep in death.” As “the firstfruits,” Jesus was resurrected on Nisan 16, 33 C.E. Later, during his presence, there would be a resurrection of ‘afterfruits’—his spirit-anointed followers.—1 Corinthians 15:20-23; 2 Corinthians 1:21; 1 John 2:20, 27.

Leviticus 23:16, 17, 20
*** w07 1/1 p. 21 “You Must Become Nothing but Joyful” ***
More Members of Abraham’s Seed
7 Jesus was the Seed who was promised in Eden and by means of whom Jehovah would “break up the works of the Devil.” (1 John 3:8) However, when Jehovah spoke to Abraham, He indicated that Abraham’s “seed” would be more than just one person. It would be “like the stars of the heavens and like the grains of sand that are on the seashore.” (Genesis 22:17) The appearance of other members of the “seed” was foreshadowed by yet another joyful festival. Fifty days after Nisan 16, Israel celebrated the Festival of Weeks. The Law about this states: “To the day after the seventh sabbath you should count, fifty days, and you must present a new grain offering to Jehovah. Out of your dwelling places you should bring two loaves as a wave offering. Of two tenths of an ephah of fine flour they should prove to be. They should be baked leavened, as first ripe fruits to Jehovah.”—Leviticus 23:16, 17, 20.

Leviticus 23:34-43
*** w07 1/1 pp. 23-24 “You Must Become Nothing but Joyful” ***
Rejoicing Before Jehovah
14 After the Atonement Day, the Israelites celebrated the Festival of Booths, the most joyful festival of the Jewish year. (Leviticus 23:34-43) That festival took place from the 15th to the 21st of Ethanim and concluded with a solemn assembly on the 22nd of the month. It marked the end of the ingathering of the harvest and was a time of thanksgiving for the abundant goodness of God. For that reason, Jehovah commanded the celebrants: “Jehovah your God will bless you in all your produce and in every deed of your hand, and you must become nothing but joyful.” (Deuteronomy 16:15) What a happy time that must have been!
15 During that festival, the Israelites dwelled in booths for seven days. They were thus reminded that at one time they had dwelled in booths in the wilderness. The festival gave them ample opportunity to reflect on Jehovah’s fatherly care. (Deuteronomy 8:15, 16) And since all, wealthy and poor alike, dwelled in booths that were similar, the Israelites were reminded that in relation to the festival, they were all equal.—Nehemiah 8:14-16.

Lev. 23:37, 38
*** w13 12/15 p. 12 Will You Make Sacrifices for the Kingdom? ***
SACRIFICES IN ANCIENT ISRAEL
4 Offering sacrifices in ancient Israel was the basis for receiving forgiveness of sins. Sacrifices were necessary for the people to enjoy Jehovah’s favor. Some of these were required; others were voluntary. (Lev. 23:37, 38) Whole burnt offerings could be made as voluntary offerings, or gifts, to Jehovah. An outstanding example of offerings was seen in connection with the inauguration of the temple in Solomon’s day.—2 Chron. 7:4-6.

Leviticus 24:20
*** w09 9/1 p. 22 When You Are Offended ***
“Eye for Eye”
Some point to the Bible in order to justify their vengeful attitude. They say, “Doesn’t the Bible speak of ‘eye for eye, tooth for tooth’?” (Leviticus 24:20) On the surface, the law of “eye for eye” may appear to promote revenge. Actually, though, it served to curb or limit senseless acts of revenge. How so?
If an Israelite assaulted a fellow Israelite and put out his eye, the Law allowed for just punishment. However, it was not up to the victim to take punitive action against the assailant or one of his family members. The Law required that he take the matter to the established authorities—the appointed judges—for proper disposition. The knowledge that the willful perpetrator of criminal or violent acts against another could be punished in kind served as a powerful deterrent. But there is more to the matter.

Leviticus 24:5-9
*** w00 4/15 pp. 14-15 pars. 8-9 The New World—Will You Be There? ***
8 Revelation 21:4 indicated that death will be no more. The passage in Isaiah chapter 66 agrees with that. We can see from verse 22 that Jehovah knows that the new heavens and the new earth will not be temporary, of limited duration. Furthermore, his people will endure; they will “keep standing” before him. What God has already done for his chosen people gives us reason for confidence. True Christians have faced vicious persecution, even fanatical efforts to wipe them out. (John 16:2; Acts 8:1) Yet, even very powerful enemies of God’s people, such as Roman Emperor Nero and Adolf Hitler, have not been able to eradicate God’s loyal ones, who bear his name. Jehovah has preserved the congregation of his people, and we can be sure that he can keep it standing lastingly.
9 Similarly, those faithful to God as part of the new earth, the society of true worshipers in the new world, will keep standing individually because they will be rendering pure worship to the Creator of all things. That will not be occasional or haphazard worship. God’s Law, provided to Israel through Moses, called for certain acts of worship each month, as marked by the new moon, and each week, as marked by the Sabbath day. (Leviticus 24:5-9; Numbers 10:10; 28:9, 10; 2 Chronicles 2:4) So Isaiah 66:23 points to regular, ongoing worship of God, week after week and month after month. Atheism and religious hypocrisy will not exist then. “All flesh will come in to bow down before” Jehovah.

Leviticus 24:14
*** w11 4/1 p. 22 The Most Infamous Trial Ever Held ***
Box on page 22]
Witnesses Answerable for Blood
Jewish courts gave this warning concerning the value of life to the witnesses in capital cases before they gave evidence:
“Perhaps it is your intention to give testimony on the basis of supposition, hearsay, or of what one witness has told another; or you may be thinking, ‘We heard it from a reliable person.’ Or, you may not know that in the end we are going to interrogate you with appropriate tests of interrogation and examination. You should know that the laws governing a trial for property cases are different from the laws governing a trial for capital cases. In the case of a trial for property cases, a person pays money and achieves atonement for himself. In capital cases [the accused’s] blood and the blood of all those who were destined to be born from him [who was wrongfully convicted] are held against him [who testifies falsely] to the end of time.”—Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin, 37a.
If the accused was convicted, the witnesses had to act as executioners.—Leviticus 24:14; Deuteronomy 17:6, 7.

Lev. 24:22
*** w10 15/3 p. 24 Um só rebanho, um só pastor ***
Um só rebanho, um só pastor
“Vós, os que me seguistes, também estareis sentados em doze tronos, julgando as doze tribos de Israel.” — MAT. 19:28.
JEOVÁ amava Abraão, de modo que mostrou amor leal aos descendentes dele. Por mais de 15 séculos, Jeová encarou a nação de Israel, que descendia de Abraão, como seu povo escolhido, sua “propriedade especial”. (Leia Deuteronômio 7:6.) Significa isso que Jeová desconsiderava totalmente as pessoas de outras nações? Não. Durante aquele período, não israelitas que quisessem adorá-lo poderiam juntar-se à nação especial de Jeová. Esses convertidos, ou prosélitos, eram tidos como parte da nação. Deviam ser tratados como irmãos. (Lev. 19:33, 34) E exigia-se que obedecessem a todas as leis de Jeová. — Lev. 24:22.


No. 1: Leviticus 23:1-14


No. 2: Universal Salvation Is Not Scriptural (rs p. 356 ¶3)

rs p. 356 ¶3 Salvation
Does 2 Peter 3:9 indicate that there will be universal salvation? It says: “The Lord is not slow about his promise as some count slowness, but is forbearing toward you, not wishing that any should perish [“he does not want anyone to be destroyed,” TEV], but that all should reach repentance.” (RS) It is God’s merciful desire that all of Adam’s offspring repent, and he has generously made provision for forgiveness of the sins of those who do. But he does not force anyone to accept that provision. (Compare Deuteronomy 30:15-20.) Many reject it. They are like a drowning man who pushes away a life preserver when it is thrown to him by someone who desires to help. It should be noted, however, that the alternative to repentance is not an eternity in hellfire. As 2 Peter 3:9 shows, those who do not repent will perish, or “be destroyed.” 2Pe 3 Verse 7 (RS) also refers to “destruction of ungodly men.” There is no thought of universal salvation here.—See also the main heading “Hell.”

No. 3: Acceptable Time—Use Wisely the Opportune Season for God’s Favor (it-1 pp. 37-38)

it-1 pp. 37-38 Acceptable Time
ACCEPTABLE TIME
At 2 Corinthians 6:2 the apostle Paul quotes from the prophecy of Isaiah 49:8, which says: “This is what Jehovah has said: ‘In a time of goodwill I have answered you, and in a day of salvation I have helped you; and I kept safeguarding you that I might give you as a covenant for the people, to rehabilitate the land, to bring about the repossessing of the desolated hereditary possessions.’” In its original setting this statement was evidently made to Isaiah as representing or personifying the nation of Israel. (Isa 49:3) It was clearly a restoration prophecy and, hence, had its first fulfillment at the time of the liberation of Israel from Babylon when the call went to the Israelite prisoners, “Come out!” They thereafter returned to their homeland and rehabilitated the desolated land.—Isa 49:9.
However, the words “that I might give you as a covenant for the people” in verse 8 of this chapter and the preceding statement in verse 6 that this “servant” of Jehovah would be given as “a light of the nations, that [God’s] salvation may come to be to the extremity of the earth,” definitely mark the prophecy as Messianic and as therefore applying to Christ Jesus as God’s “servant.” (Compare Isa 42:1-4, 6, 7 with Mt 12:18-21.) Since the “time of goodwill” was a time when Jehovah would ‘answer’ and ‘help’ his servant, it must apply to Jesus’ earthly life when he “offered up supplications and also petitions to the One who was able to save him out of death, with strong outcries and tears, and he was favorably heard for his godly fear.” (Heb 5:7-9; compare Joh 12:27, 28; 17:1-5; Lu 22:41-44; 23:46.) It was, therefore, “a day of salvation” for God’s own Son, during which period of opportunity he demonstrated perfection of integrity and, as a result, “became responsible for everlasting salvation to all those obeying him.”—Heb 5:9.
Additionally, Paul’s quotation from this prophecy indicates a still further application to those Christians whom Paul urges “not to accept the undeserved kindness of God and miss its purpose,” and to whom he says (after quoting Isa 49:8): “Look! Now is the especially acceptable time. Look! Now is the day of salvation.” (2Co 6:1, 2) Such Christians had become the spiritual “Israel of God” from Pentecost of 33 C.E. forward (Ga 6:16), but there was a need for them to prove worthy of God’s undeserved kindness, so that the “acceptable time” might indeed prove to be “a day of salvation” for them.
The fact that the prophecy in its original application was one of restoration would likewise indicate an application to a time of release from spiritual captivity and of restoration to full favor with God.—Compare Ps 69:13-18.
To natural Jews who failed to appreciate the favorableness of the time and the opportunity that was theirs for entry into ‘spiritual Israel,’ Paul announced that he was turning to the non-Jewish nations, and he quoted Isaiah 49:6 in support, saying: “In fact, Jehovah has laid commandment upon us in these words, ‘I have appointed you as a light of nations, for you to be a salvation to the extremity of the earth.’” (Ac 13:47) Since “time” and “day” are terms indicating temporariness, they imply urgency and the need to use wisely an opportune period or season of favor before its end comes bringing the withdrawal of divine mercy and offer of salvation.—Ro 13:11-13; 1Th 5:6-11; Eph 5:15-20.

References consulted on: Watchtower Library 2013 CD‒ROM

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