SEARCH CONTENTS

Custom Search

2 Kings 12-13-14-15, Bible Highlights: week starting september 7

ADS

Highlights From Bible Reading: 2 Kings 12-15. Information for personal study.

Read and listen to the reading of the Bible in JW.org:


Research for Highlights of : 2 Kings 12-15

(2 KINGS 12:10)

“Whenever they saw that there was a great deal of money in the chest, the secretary of the king and the high priest would come up and collect and count the money that had been brought to the house of Jehovah.”

*** it-1 p. 242 Bag ***
The Hebrew word tserohrʹ is derived from a verb meaning “wrap up” (Ex 12:34) and describes a common form of receptacle tied with a cord or string, either as a “bundle” (Ge 42:35) or as a “bag” with only the neck being drawn together and tied. (Pr 7:20; Ca 1:13) It appears that the money received from the chest of temple contributions was bound into such bundles, doubtless of uniform quantities. (2Ki 12:10)

(2 KINGS 12:13)

“However, none of the money brought to the house of Jehovah was used to make basins of silver, extinguishers, bowls, trumpets, or any sort of gold or silver article for the house of Jehovah.”

*** it-1 p. 788 Extinguishers ***
EXTINGUISHERS
Mezam•meʹreth, the Hebrew word variously translated “snuffers” (AS), “knives” (JB), and “extinguishers” (NW), is derived from a root (za•marʹ) meaning “trim; prune.” Hence some believe that scissorlike utensils designed for trimming the lampwicks are meant. However, all that is definitely known about these utensils is that they were made of gold or copper and were used in connection with the services at the temple.—1Ki 7:50; 2Ki 12:13; 25:14; 2Ch 4:22; Jer 52:18.

(2 KINGS 13:3)

“So Jehovah’s anger grew hot against Israel, and he gave them into the hand of King Hazʹa•el of Syria and into the hand of Ben-haʹdad the son of Hazʹa•el all their days.”

*** it-1 p. 1047 Hazael ***
Particularly during the reign of Jehu’s son Jehoahaz of Israel, Hazael became a great oppressor of Israel, fulfilling what the prophet Elisha had foreseen—that Hazael would consign Israel’s fortified places to the fire, kill their choice men with the sword, dash to pieces their children, and rip up their pregnant women. (2Ki 13:3, 22; 8:12)

(2 KINGS 13:5)

“So Jehovah provided Israel with a savior to free them from Syria’s grip, and the Israelites were able to dwell in their homes as before.”

*** it-1 p. 287 Ben-hadad ***
3. The son of Hazael, king of Syria. (2Ki 13:3) Ben-hadad III was evidently associated with his father in the oppression of Israel in the days of Jehoahaz (876-c. 860 B.C.E.) and in the Syrian capture of Israelite cities. Jehovah, however, raised up “a savior” for Israel, apparently in the persons of Jehoahaz’ son Jehoash (c. 859-845 B.C.E.) and his successor Jeroboam II (c. 844-804 B.C.E.). (2Ki 13:4, 5) In fulfillment of Elisha’s final prophecy, Jehoash recaptured “from the hand of Ben-hadad the son of Hazael the cities that he had taken from the hand of Jehoahaz,” defeating the Syrian forces on three occasions. (2Ki 13:19, 23-25) Jeroboam II followed up his father’s victories over Syria, returning Israel’s boundaries to their former state, thus serving as a savior for Israel. (2Ki 14:23-27) Ben-hadad III is not mentioned in connection with Jeroboam’s conquests and may not have been living by that time.

(2 KINGS 13:7)

“Je•hoʹa•haz was left with an army of only 50 horsemen, 10 chariots, and 10,000 foot soldiers, because the king of Syria had destroyed them, trampling them like the dust at threshing time.”

*** it-2 p. 1097 Threshing ***
Threshing also illustrates the crushing treatment men sometimes mete out to others. (2Ki 13:7)

(2 KINGS 13:17)

“Then he said: “Open the window toward the east.” So he opened it. E•liʹsha said: “Shoot!” So he shot. He now said: “Jehovah’s arrow of victory, the arrow of victory over Syria! You will strike down Syria at Aʹphek until you finish it off.””

*** it-1 p. 120 Aphek ***
5. A city mentioned at 1 Kings 20:26 as the site of the defeat of the Syrian Ben-hadad II. The retreating Syrians pulled back to the city, only to have its wall fall upon 27,000 of them. (1Ki 20:29, 30) It likewise seems to be the place prophetically indicated to King Jehoash by the dying prophet Elisha as the point where the Syrians would suffer future defeats at the hands of Israelites. (2Ki 13:17-19, 25) Some scholars would place the Aphek mentioned in these texts about 5 km (3 mi) E of the Sea of Galilee, where the modern village of Afiq or Fiq is found. However, so far no remains older than the fourth century B.C.E. have been found at the site. But at nearby ʽEn Gev on the shore of the Sea of Galilee remains of a large fortified city of the tenth to eighth centuries B.C.E. have been discovered.

(2 KINGS 13:21)

“As some men were burying a man, they saw the marauder band, so they quickly threw the man into E•liʹsha’s burial place and ran off. When the man touched the bones of E•liʹsha, he came to life and stood on his feet.”

*** w05 8/1 p. 11 par. 3 Highlights From the Book of Second Kings ***
13:20, 21—Does this miracle support the veneration of religious relics? No, it does not. The Bible does not show that the bones of Elisha were ever venerated. It was God’s power that made this miracle possible, as was the case with all the miracles Elisha performed when he was still alive.

*** w91 11/15 p. 5 Does Devotion to Relics Please God? ***
Certain advocates of the veneration of relics cite 2 Kings 13:21, which says: “It came about that as they were burying a man, why, here they saw the marauding band. At once they threw the man into [the prophet] Elisha’s burial place and went off. When the man touched the bones of Elisha, he immediately came to life and stood upon his feet.” This was a miracle involving the lifeless bones of one of God’s prophets. But Elisha was dead and “conscious of nothing at all” at the time of the miracle. (Ecclesiastes 9:5, 10) Hence, this resurrection must be attributed to the miracle-working power of Jehovah God, who effected it by means of his holy spirit, or active force. It is also noteworthy that the Scriptures do not say that Elisha’s bones were ever venerated.

*** it-1 p. 352 Bones ***
A miracle performed in connection with Elisha (posthumously) was the immediate raising to life of a man whose dead body was thrown into Elisha’s burial place and touched his bones. This was proof that it was God’s power, not Elisha’s, that performed the miracles Elisha had accomplished, and it was a powerful attestation or a seal of God as to the genuineness of his faithful prophet.—2Ki 13:20, 21.

(2 KINGS 13:22)

“Now King Hazʹa•el of Syria oppressed Israel all the days of Je•hoʹa•haz.”

*** it-1 p. 1047 Hazael ***
Particularly during the reign of Jehu’s son Jehoahaz of Israel, Hazael became a great oppressor of Israel, fulfilling what the prophet Elisha had foreseen—that Hazael would consign Israel’s fortified places to the fire, kill their choice men with the sword, dash to pieces their children, and rip up their pregnant women. (2Ki 13:3, 22; 8:12)

(2 KINGS 14:1)

“In the second year of Je•hoʹash the son of Je•hoʹa•haz the king of Israel, Am•a•ziʹah the son of King Je•hoʹash of Judah became king.”

*** it-2 p. 80 Joahaz ***
1. Variant spelling of the name of Jehoahaz, king of Israel, as found in certain translations (AS, JP, Ro, RS) of 2 Kings 14:1. There the Masoretic text reads Yoh•ʼa•chazʹ, but on the authority of Hebrew manuscripts that read Yehoh•ʼa•chazʹ, other translations (AT, JB, Mo, NW) render the name Jehoahaz.—See JEHOAHAZ No. 2.

(2 KINGS 14:2)

“He was 25 years old when he became king, and he reigned for 29 years in Jerusalem. His mother’s name was Je•ho•adʹdin of Jerusalem.”

*** it-1 p. 1265 Jehoaddin ***
JEHOADDIN
(Je•ho•adʹdin) [Jehovah Is Pleasure].
Mother of Judah’s King Amaziah; wife of Jehoash. (2Ki 14:1, 2) In the Hebrew text the name is written “Jehoaddin,” with a marginal note saying it should be read as “Jehoaddan,” as at 2 Chronicles 25:1.

(2 KINGS 14:8)

“Then Am•a•ziʹah sent messengers to Je•hoʹash son of Je•hoʹa•haz son of Jeʹhu the king of Israel, saying: “Come, let us confront each other in battle.””

*** it-1 p. 88 Amaziah ***
Amaziah’s second campaign was tragic from start to finish. The 100,000 from Israel who were dismissed raided towns of Judah on their return north. Perhaps it was this that provoked Amaziah foolishly to challenge Jehoash of the strong northern kingdom, saying: “Do come. Let us look each other in the face.” Jehoash’s response: How foolish for a thorny weed to confront a massive cedar only to be trampled by a wild beast! Amaziah refused to listen; he was apparently puffed up with his recent victory, and Jehovah had doomed Amaziah to defeat because of his idolatry. The battle was joined at Beth-shemesh, Judah fled, Amaziah was captured, a breach of about 178 m (584 ft) was made in Jerusalem’s wall, and much temple treasure and many hostages were carried back to Samaria.—2Ki 14:8-14; 2Ch 25:13, 17-24.

(2 KINGS 14:9)

“King Je•hoʹash of Israel sent this message to King Am•a•ziʹah of Judah: “The thorny weed in Lebʹa•non sent a message to the cedar in Lebʹa•non, ‘Give your daughter to my son as a wife.’ However, a wild beast of Lebʹa•non passed by and trampled down the thorny weed.”

*** it-1 p. 424 Cedar ***
Figurative Use. In the Scriptures the majestic cedar is used figuratively to represent stateliness, loftiness, and strength, either real or apparent. (Eze 31:2-14; Am 2:9; Zec 11:1, 2) Thus, King Jehoash of Israel intended his reply to King Amaziah of Judah to be a withering insult when he compared Amaziah’s kingdom to a “thorny weed” while likening his own kingdom to a mighty cedar of Lebanon. (2Ki 14:9; compare Jg 9:15, 20.)

(2 KINGS 14:13)

“King Je•hoʹash of Israel captured King Am•a•ziʹah of Judah, son of Je•hoʹash son of A•ha•ziʹah, at Beth-sheʹmesh. Then they came to Jerusalem, and he made a breach in the wall of Jerusalem from the Gate of Eʹphra•im to the Corner Gate, 400 cubits.”

*** it-1 p. 894 Gate, Gateway ***
Gate of Ephraim. The Gate of Ephraim was located in the Broad Wall 400 cubits (178 m; 583 ft) E of the Corner Gate. (2Ki 14:13; 2Ch 25:23) It was an exit N in the direction of the territory of Ephraim. It, too, has been identified by some researchers with the Middle Gate (Jer 39:3), by others with the First Gate. (Zec 14:10) It is thought to be (or correspond to) the Gennath or Garden Gate spoken of by the Jewish historian Josephus. (The Jewish War, V, 146 [iv, 2]) Near the Gate of Ephraim there was a public square in which the people made booths to celebrate the Festival of Booths in Nehemiah’s time. (Ne 8:16) This gate is not named in Nehemiah’s reconstruction text, evidently because it did not need extensive repairs.

*** it-1 p. 894 Gate, Gateway ***
Corner Gate. This gate was evidently located in the NW angle of the city wall, W of the Gate of Ephraim. (2Ki 14:13; 2Ch 25:23) It was on the E side of the Valley of Hinnom, apparently in the W wall of the old city at the point where it joined the Broad Wall.

(2 KINGS 14:23)

“In the 15th year of Am•a•ziʹah the son of Je•hoʹash the king of Judah, Jer•o•boʹam the son of King Je•hoʹash of Israel became king in Sa•marʹi•a, and he reigned for 41 years.”

*** si p. 153 par. 2 Bible Book Number 32—Jonah ***
At 2 Kings 14:23-25 we read that Jeroboam the king of Israel extended the boundary of the nation according to the word that Jehovah spoke through Jonah. This would place the time of Jonah’s prophesying at about 844 B.C.E., the year of the accession of Jeroboam II of Israel and many years before Assyria, with its capital at Nineveh, began to dominate Israel.

(2 KINGS 14:25)

“He restored the boundary of Israel from Leʹbo-haʹmath clear to the Sea of the Arʹa•bah, according to the word that Jehovah the God of Israel spoke through his servant Joʹnah the son of A•mitʹtai, the prophet from Gath-heʹpher.”

*** ia chap. 13 pp. 108-109 par. 4 He Learned From His Mistakes ***
4 The Bible reveals a little about Jonah’s background. (Read 2 Kings 14:25.) He was from Gath-hepher, just two and a half miles (4 km) from Nazareth, the town where Jesus Christ would grow up some eight centuries later. Jonah served as a prophet during the reign of King Jeroboam II of the ten-tribe kingdom of Israel. The time of Elijah was long past; his successor, Elisha, had died during the reign of Jeroboam’s father. Although Jehovah had used those men to wipe out Baal worship, Israel was willfully going astray again. The land was now under the influence of a king who “continued to do what was bad in Jehovah’s eyes.” (2 Ki. 14:24) So Jonah’s service could not have been easy or pleasant. Yet, he carried it out faithfully.

*** w09 1/1 p. 25 He Learned From His Mistakes ***
At 2 Kings 14:25, we learn a little about Jonah’s background. He was from Gath-hepher, just two and a half miles [4 km] from Nazareth, the town where Jesus Christ would grow up some eight centuries later. Jonah served as a prophet during the reign of King Jeroboam II of the ten-tribe kingdom of Israel. The time of Elijah was long past; his successor, Elisha, had died during the reign of Jeroboam’s father. Although Jehovah had used those men to wipe out Baal worship, Israel was willfully going astray again. The land was now under the influence of a king who “continued to do what was bad in Jehovah’s eyes.” (2 Kings 14:24) So Jonah’s service could not have been easy or pleasant. Yet, he carried it out faithfully.

*** it-2 p. 843 Salt Sea ***
SALT SEA
One of the Biblical designations for the large lake or sea now generally known as the Dead Sea. The Salt Sea (Yam ha-Melah) forms the southern termination of the Jordan River.
Name. The first and most frequent designation of this sea in the Bible, “Salt Sea,” is quite appropriate, since it is one of the saltiest bodies of water on the earth. (Ge 14:3; Nu 34:3, 12; Jos 15:2, 5) It is also called the sea of the Arabah (De 4:49; 2Ki 14:25), being in the huge rift of which the Arabah is a part. Sometimes, though, the name “Salt Sea” is added after “sea of the Arabah” as if to explain exactly which body of water is meant by the later name. (De 3:17; Jos 3:16; 12:3)

(2 KINGS 14:28)

“As for the rest of the history of Jer•o•boʹam, all that he did and his mightiness, how he fought and how he restored Damascus and Haʹmath to Judah in Israel, is it not written in the book of the history of the times of the kings of Israel?”

*** it-1 p. 572 Damascus ***
As king of Damascus, Hazael continued an aggressive policy toward Israel. (2Ki 10:32) Extending Damascene power as far as the Philistine city of Gath, he even invaded Judah, intimidating King Jehoash (898-859 B.C.E.) so that the Judean king paid a huge tribute to spare Jerusalem from Syrian attack. (2Ki 12:17, 18; 13:3, 22; 2Ch 24:23, 24) Under Hazael’s successor, Ben-hadad III, the yoke of Damascus was loosened from Israel’s territory as Jehoash of Israel (c. 859-845 B.C.E.) inflicted three defeats on Syria. (2Ki 13:24, 25) Then Jeroboam II of Israel (c. 844-804 B.C.E.) pushed deep into Syria as far as “the entering in of Hamath,” and “restored Damascus and Hamath to Judah in Israel.” (2Ki 14:23-28) This is generally understood to mean the making of these kingdoms tributary, similar to their position under Solomon.—1Ki 4:21.

*** it-2 p. 38 Jeroboam ***
However, the outstanding achievement of his reign was the restoration of land that had earlier been lost by the kingdom. In fulfillment of Jonah’s prophecy, Jeroboam “restored the boundary of Israel from the entering in of Hamath clear to the sea of the Arabah [Dead Sea].” He is also credited with restoring “Damascus and Hamath to Judah in Israel.” (2Ki 14:25-28) This may mean that Jeroboam made the kingdoms of Damascus and Hamath tributary, as they had once been to Judah during the reign of Solomon.—Compare 1Ki 4:21; 2Ch 8:4.

(2 KINGS 15:1)

“In the 27th year of King Jer•o•boʹam of Israel, Az•a•riʹah the son of King Am•a•ziʹah of Judah became king.”

*** it-2 p. 1146 Uzziah ***
After the death of his father, 16-year-old Uzziah was made king by the people of Judah. (2Ki 14:21; 2Ch 26:1) According to 2 Kings 15:1, however, Uzziah became king in the 27th year of Israelite King Jeroboam (II). As this would place the beginning of Uzziah’s rule approximately 12 years after the death of his father, this must refer to his ‘becoming king’ in a special sense. It may be that in the 27th year of King Jeroboam, the two-tribe Judean kingdom was freed from subjection to the northern kingdom, a subjection that perhaps began when Israelite King Jehoash defeated Uzziah’s father Amaziah. (2Ch 25:22-24) So it may be that Uzziah became king a second time in the sense of being free from the domination of Israelite King Jeroboam (II).

(2 KINGS 15:5)

“Jehovah afflicted the king, and he remained a leper until the day of his death; and he stayed in a separate house, while the king’s son Joʹtham was in charge of the house, judging the people of the land.”

*** w05 8/1 p. 11 par. 4 Highlights From the Book of Second Kings ***
15:1-6—Why did Jehovah plague Azariah (Uzziah, 15:6, footnote) with leprosy? “As soon as [Uzziah] was strong, his heart became haughty . . . , so that he acted unfaithfully against Jehovah his God and came into the temple of Jehovah to burn incense upon the altar of incense.” When the priests “stood up against Uzziah” and told him to “go out from the sanctuary,” he became enraged against the priests and was struck with leprosy.—2 Chronicles 26:16-20.

(2 KINGS 15:16)

“It was then that Menʹa•hem came from Tirʹzah and struck down Tiphʹsah and all who were in it and its territory, because it did not open its gates to him. He struck it down and ripped open its pregnant women.”

*** it-2 p. 371 Menahem ***
MENAHEM
(Menʹa•hem) [One Who Comforts].
Son of Gadi and king of Israel for ten years from about 790 B.C.E. Upon learning that Shallum had assassinated King Zechariah, Menahem went from Tirzah to Samaria and killed the assassin there. He then assumed rulership. Evidently during the early part of his reign Menahem struck down Tiphsah “and all that was in it and its territory out from Tirzah, because it did not open up.” The town was apparently reluctant to open its gate to him. (LXX, Vg, Sy) Harsh treatment was meted out to the populace: “All its pregnant women he ripped up.”—2Ki 15:10, 13-17.

(2 KINGS 15:19)

“King Pul of As•syrʹi•a came into the land, and Menʹa•hem gave Pul 1,000 talents of silver in return for his support in strengthening his hold on the kingdom.”

*** si p. 69 par. 3 Bible Book Number 12—2 Kings ***
There are the inscriptions of Assyrian king Tiglath-pileser III (Pul), which name several kings of Israel and Judah, including Menahem, Ahaz, and Pekah.—15:19, 20; 16:5-8.

*** w88 2/15 p. 26 Part 2—Cruel Assyria—The Second Great World Power ***
Tiglath-pileser III (also called Pul) is the first Assyrian king mentioned by name in the Bible. He advanced into the northern kingdom of Israel during the reign of Menahem (791-780 B.C.E.). The Bible says Menahem paid him a thousand talents of silver to withdraw.—2 Kings 15:19, 20.
In his own annals, found at Calah, Tiglath-pileser confirms this Biblical fact, saying: “I received tribute from . . . Menahem of Samaria.”

*** it-1 p. 204 Assyria ***
Tiglath-pileser III. The first Assyrian king to be mentioned by name in the Bible is Tiglath-pileser III (2Ki 15:29; 16:7, 10), also called “Pul” at 2 Kings 15:19. At 1 Chronicles 5:26 both names are used, and this caused some in the past to view them as separate kings. However, Babylonian and Assyrian King Lists give both names to the same individual. The suggestion is made by some that this king was originally known as Pul and that he assumed the name Tiglath-pileser upon ascending to the Assyrian throne.—See PUL No. 1.

*** it-1 p. 204 Assyria ***
It was during the reign of Menahem of Israel (c. 790-781 B.C.E.) that Tiglath-pileser III entered the domain of that northern kingdom. Menahem made a payment to him of a thousand silver talents ($6,606,000) and thus obtained the withdrawal of the Assyrian. (2Ki 15:19, 20)

*** it-2 p. 371 Menahem ***
During his reign, King Pul (Tiglath-pileser III) invaded Israel, and Menahem was forced to pay that Assyrian monarch “a thousand talents of silver.” ($6,606,000) He acquired this sum by imposing an assessment of 50 silver shekels upon each of “the valiant, mighty men” of Israel. Since a talent of silver equaled about 3,000 shekels, the silver was obtained from about 60,000 persons. Menahem gave the silver to the Assyrian king, “that his hands might prove to be with him to strengthen the kingdom in his own hand.” Upon receiving this amount, Pul withdrew from the land.—2Ki 15:19, 20.

*** it-2 p. 1101 Tiglath-pileser (III) ***
This king first appears in the Bible account as “Pul.” (2Ki 15:19) First Chronicles 5:26 also states that God “stirred up the spirit of Pul the king of Assyria even the spirit of Tilgath-pilneser the king of Assyria, so that he took into exile” peoples of certain tribes of Israel. The ancient secular records apply both names to the same individual, the name “Pulu” appearing in what is known as “The Babylonian King List A,” while “The Synchronistic Chronicle” lists “Tukultiapilesharra” (Tiglath-pileser). (Ancient Near Eastern Texts, edited by J. Pritchard, 1974, pp. 272, 273) It is also of note that, in the Hebrew, the above-quoted scripture uses the verb “took” in the singular rather than in the plural. It is commonly suggested that “Pul” was the monarch’s personal name and that he assumed the name “Tiglath-pileser” (the name of an earlier and famous Assyrian king) upon ascending the throne.
It appears that during the early part of his reign, Tiglath-pileser III was occupied in hammering out stronger borders for the empire in the S, E, and N. The menacing shadow of Assyria, however, soon loomed large over the lands of Syria and Palestine to the W.
The Assyrian inscriptions prominently mention Azriau of Ia-ú-da-a-a (Judah) in connection with a campaign by Tiglath-pileser III in Syria. (Ancient Near Eastern Texts, pp. 282, 283) This would seem to be a reference to King Azariah of Judah, more commonly known as Uzziah (829-778 B.C.E.), but the matter is a debated one, because some hold that the small kingdom of Samʼal in Syria was on occasion also called Judah. The likelihood of such a pagan king having a name including the name of Jah (the abbreviated form of Jehovah) and living at the same time as the Judean king of the same name seems slight; however, the Bible does not mention Tiglath-pileser III in connection with Azariah (Uzziah), and the Assyrian records are considerably mutilated.
During the reign of King Menahem of Israel (c. 790-781 B.C.E.), Tiglath-pileser III (Pul) advanced into Palestine, and Menahem sought the Assyrian’s favor by paying him tribute to the amount of “a thousand talents of silver” ($6,606,000 in current values). Temporarily appeased, Tiglath-pileser withdrew his forces. (2Ki 15:19, 20) The Assyrian documents refer to Me-ni-hi-im-me (Menahem), along with Rezon (Rezin) of Damascus and Hiram of Tyre, as tributary to Tiglath-pileser.
Subsequently, in the time of King Ahaz of Judah (761-746 B.C.E.), King Pekah of Israel formed a confederation with King Rezin of Damascus and attacked Judah. (2Ki 16:5, 6; Isa 7:1, 2) Though assured by the prophet Isaiah that within a short time the two conspiring kingdoms would be wiped off the scene, King Ahaz chose to send a bribe to Tiglath-pileser to come to his rescue. (2Ki 16:7, 8; Isa 7:7-16; 8:9-13) An Assyrian inscription describes the tribute paid by Ia-u-ha-zi (Jehoahaz, or Ahaz) of Judah and other kings of that area as follows: “gold, silver, tin, iron, antimony, linen garments with multicolored trimmings, garments of their native (industries) (being made of) dark purple wool . . . all kinds of costly objects be they products of the sea or of the continent, the (choice) products of their regions, the treasures of (their) kings, horses, mules (trained for) the yoke.” (Ancient Near Eastern Texts, p. 282) The aggressive Assyrian responded to Ahaz’ urging by invading Israel, capturing several northern cities, and overrunning the regions of Gilead, Galilee, and Naphtali, carrying many off into exile. (2Ki 15:29; 1Ch 5:6, 26) Damascus was attacked and fell to the Assyrian forces, and its King Rezin was slain. Here at Damascus, Tiglath-pileser III received the visit of King Ahaz of Judah, coming either to express gratitude or submission to Assyria.—2Ki 16:9-12.
Isaiah had been inspired to foretell that Jehovah would use the king of Assyria like “a hired razor” to “shave” the kingdom of Judah. (Isa 7:17, 20) Whether the “hired razor” referred specifically to Tiglath-pileser III, whom Ahaz bribed, or not, the record does show that he caused great distress to the Judean king and that Ahaz’ bribe proved to be “of no assistance to him.” (2Ch 28:20, 21) This may have marked the initial phase of the “flood” of Assyrian invasion of Judah, which eventually was to ‘reach up to the very neck of the kingdom,’ as it clearly did in Hezekiah’s time.—Isa 8:5-8; 2Ki 18:13, 14.
Tiglath-pileser III, in his inscriptions, says concerning the northern kingdom of Israel: “They overthrew their king Pekah (Pa-qa-ha) and I placed Hoshea (A-ú-si-ʼ) as king over them. I received from them 10 talents of gold [$3,853,500], 1,000(?) talents of silver [$6,606,000] as their [tri]bute and brought them to Assyria.” (Ancient Near Eastern Texts, p. 284) Thus the Assyrian king assumes credit for the assumption of the kingship of Israel by Hoshea following his conspiratorial assassination of Hoshea’s predecessor, Pekah (c. 758 B.C.E.).—2Ki 15:30.

*** it-2 p. 1102 Tiglath-pileser (III) ***
At 2 Chronicles 28:16 Ahaz is spoken of as sending “to the kings of Assyria for them to help him.” While the plural “kings,” occurring in the Hebrew Masoretic text, appears in the singular (“king”) in the Septuagint and in other ancient manuscripts, there are modern translations that favor the Hebrew plural. (JP, NW) Some scholars view the plural here as merely indicating the sum of majesty and greatness ascribed to the one monarch (Tiglath-pileser III) as the “king of kings.” Yet attention is also called to the boastful claim of the Assyrian monarch recorded at Isaiah 10:8: “Are not my princes at the same time kings?” It is thus possible that the reference to “Pul the king of Assyria” (2Ki 15:19) may also be applied in the sense of his being the ruler of an Assyrian province prior to becoming head of the entire empire.

(2 KINGS 15:20)

“So Menʹa•hem raised the silver from Israel by exacting it from the prominent, wealthy men. He gave the king of As•syrʹi•a 50 silver shekels for each man. Then the king of As•syrʹi•a turned back and did not stay in the land.”

*** it-2 p. 371 Menahem ***
During his reign, King Pul (Tiglath-pileser III) invaded Israel, and Menahem was forced to pay that Assyrian monarch “a thousand talents of silver.” ($6,606,000) He acquired this sum by imposing an assessment of 50 silver shekels upon each of “the valiant, mighty men” of Israel. Since a talent of silver equaled about 3,000 shekels, the silver was obtained from about 60,000 persons. Menahem gave the silver to the Assyrian king, “that his hands might prove to be with him to strengthen the kingdom in his own hand.” Upon receiving this amount, Pul withdrew from the land.—2Ki 15:19, 20.

(2 KINGS 15:29)

“In the days of King Peʹkah of Israel, King Tigʹlath-pil•eʹser of As•syrʹi•a invaded and captured Iʹjon, Aʹbel-beth-maʹa•cah, Ja•noʹah, Keʹdesh, Haʹzor, Gilʹe•ad, and Galʹi•lee—all the land of Naphʹta•li—and he took the inhabitants into exile in As•syrʹi•a.”

*** it-1 p. 16 Abel-beth-maacah ***
Abel of Beth-maacah was captured by Tiglath-pileser III of Assyria during the reign of Pekah, and its inhabitants were sent into exile. (2Ki 15:29) This city, called in Assyrian texts Abilakka, appears in the inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser III in the list of cities he conquered.

*** it-1 p. 62 Ahaz ***
With regard to the “sixty-five years” at Isaiah 7:8, which Isaiah prophesied would be the period within which Ephraim would be “shattered to pieces,” the Commentary on the Whole Bible (by Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown) states: “One deportation of Israel happened within one or two years from this time [the time of Isaiah’s prophecy], under Tiglath-pileser (2 Kings 15. 29). Another in the reign of Hoshea, under Shalmaneser (2 Kings 17. 1-6), was about twenty years after. But the final one which utterly ‘broke’ up Israel so as to be ‘not a people,’ accompanied by a colonization of Samaria with foreigners, was under Esar-haddon, who carried away Manasseh, king of Judah, also, in the twenty-second year of his reign, sixty-five years from the utterance of this prophecy (cf. Ezra 4.2, 3, 10, with 2 Kings 17.24; 2 Chronicles 33.11).”

*** it-1 p. 415 Captivity ***
During the reign of Israelite King Pekah at Samaria (c. 778-759 B.C.E.), Assyrian King Pul (Tiglath-pileser III) came against Israel, captured a large section in the N, and deported its inhabitants to eastern parts of his empire. (2Ki 15:29)

*** it-2 p. 595 Pekah ***
Apparently also at this time Tiglath-pileser captured the regions of Gilead, Galilee, and Naphtali, as well as a number of cities in northern Israel. (2Ki 15:29) Thereafter Hoshea the son of Elah killed Pekah and became Israel’s next king.—2Ki 15:30.
A fragmentary historical text of Tiglath-pileser III reports about his campaign against Israel: “All its inhabitants (and) their possessions I led to Assyria. They overthrew their king Pekah (Pa-qa-ha) and I placed Hoshea (A-ú-si-ʼ) as king over them.”—Ancient Near Eastern Texts, edited by J. B. Pritchard, 1974, p. 284.

(2 KINGS 15:30)

“Then Ho•sheʹa the son of Eʹlah formed a conspiracy against Peʹkah the son of Rem•a•liʹah, and he struck him and put him to death; and he became king in his place in the 20th year of Joʹtham the son of Uz•ziʹah.”

*** it-1 p. 1149 Hoshea ***
Second Kings 15:30 states that Hoshea put Pekah to death and “began to reign in place of him in the twentieth year of Jotham.” Since Judean King Jotham is credited with only 16 years (2Ki 15:32, 33; 2Ch 27:1, 8), this may refer to the 20th year counting from the start of Jotham’s kingship, which would actually be the fourth year of the reign of Jotham’s successor Ahaz.—See JOTHAM No. 3.

*** it-2 p. 119 Jotham ***
Since Jotham ruled only 16 years, the reference at 2 Kings 15:30 to the “twentieth year of Jotham” evidently is to be understood to mean the 20th year after his becoming king, that is, the fourth year of Ahaz. The writer of the Kings account may have chosen not to introduce Jotham’s successor Ahaz at this point because of yet having to supply details about Jotham’s reign.

*** it-2 p. 595 Pekah ***
Apparently also at this time Tiglath-pileser captured the regions of Gilead, Galilee, and Naphtali, as well as a number of cities in northern Israel. (2Ki 15:29) Thereafter Hoshea the son of Elah killed Pekah and became Israel’s next king.—2Ki 15:30.
A fragmentary historical text of Tiglath-pileser III reports about his campaign against Israel: “All its inhabitants (and) their possessions I led to Assyria. They overthrew their king Pekah (Pa-qa-ha) and I placed Hoshea (A-ú-si-ʼ) as king over them.”—Ancient Near Eastern Texts, edited by J. B. Pritchard, 1974, p. 284.

*** it-2 p. 1101 Tiglath-pileser (III) ***
Tiglath-pileser III, in his inscriptions, says concerning the northern kingdom of Israel: “They overthrew their king Pekah (Pa-qa-ha) and I placed Hoshea (A-ú-si-ʼ) as king over them. I received from them 10 talents of gold [$3,853,500], 1,000(?) talents of silver [$6,606,000] as their [tri]bute and brought them to Assyria.” (Ancient Near Eastern Texts, p. 284) Thus the Assyrian king assumes credit for the assumption of the kingship of Israel by Hoshea following his conspiratorial assassination of Hoshea’s predecessor, Pekah (c. 758 B.C.E.).—2Ki 15:30.

(2 KINGS 15:35)

“However, the high places were not removed, and the people were still sacrificing and making sacrificial smoke on the high places. He was the one who built the upper gate of the house of Jehovah.”

*** it-1 p. 897 Gate, Gateway ***
“Upper gate of the house of Jehovah.” This may have been a gate leading to the inner court, possibly “the new gate of Jehovah,” where Jeremiah was tried; also where Jeremiah’s secretary Baruch read the scroll before the people. (Jer 26:10; 36:10) Jeremiah may have called it “the new gate” because it had not been so anciently built as the others; possibly it was “the upper gate of the house of Jehovah” built by King Jotham.—2Ki 15:32, 35; 2Ch 27:3.

Click on the image to Download complete information into digital files for Computer, Tablet PC, Smartphone

Download information for the personal Studio for Computer, Tablet PC, Smartphone

Download information for the personal Studio for Computer, Tablet PC, Smartphone

SEARCH CONTENTS

Custom Search