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Understanding the tide

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Tides are produced in the oceans and seas due to the force of gravity, but the explanation thereof is difficult, since it is not based on the fact that the moon attract water from the oceans to it.


Understanding the tide

Understanding the tide

The same beach with tide, and no tide.


As proof of this assertion, we consider the following: there are two tides a day instead of one, as one might assume on the basis of a simple picture. Besides, high tide usually originates when the moon is on the horizon, rather than when it is perpendicular above us, as one would expect if we thought that the tides were caused by water that rises to the moon.

Understanding the tide

There are two tides because, while the Moon pushes the water away from the Earth at the side facing her, pushes the Earth away from the water on the opposite side. The overall result, as seen by someone from Earth, is that the water rises above the normal surface in two diametrically opposite sides of the planet.
The fact that tides incurred when the Moon is above the horizon, rather than overhead, has to do with the property that the oceans and seas are relatively shallow, so the swelling tide can not move through the water so fast enough to follow the rhythm of movement of the Moon.

Understanding the tide

Earth tides also occur, just as there are tides in the oceans. Although ocean tides are most evident proof of gravitational phenomena also cause tides on land.
while the moon passes above us, the level of the "solid" earth rises a few inches and then drops again. As this movement occurs during a period of twelve hours, usually not notice it. All solid objects in the universe, from Earth to the moons of Jupiter and beyond, earth tides manifest if they are located near a large object. Ocean tides, moreover, are only produced on Earth.

Understanding the tide

The sun helps cause ocean tides on Earth, but only a third of the height as causing the moon. This fact is caused by the existence of higher tides than usual at times.
During the new moon and the full moon, when tides are the Moon and the Sun are strengthened, we have so-called "spring tides." In the quarter moon, the two forces are unbalanced and have lower high tides, called "neap tides."

Understanding the tide

A consequence of the tides, the moon shows the same face always. According shows the law of universal gravitation, the Earth must also produce tidal land on the moon.
Turns out, when we calculate the effects of earth tides on the Moon, we find that after a few hundred thousand years the satellite (Moon) end while maintaining the same face toward its larger companion.
In astronomical parlance, is called the satellite has been "despinning". All large moons in the solar system have been desgiradas.


Understanding the tide

Understanding the tide

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