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3.5 Jeju Island

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Jeju Island (South Korea)




Review of this natural wonder

This territory was an independent country, known as Tamna, until the year 662, which became part of the protectorate of Chair. In 938, after the fall of Chair, Tamna becomes a protectorate of Goryeo. In 1105, Tamna loses its autonomy, and becomes a province of Goryeo. King Euijong de Goryeo changed the name of the island of Tamna by Jeju. In 1271, Jeju was the basis of the Sambyeolcho rebellion against the Mongols; Sambyeolcho was defeated in 1273, and Jeju-do not returned to be part of Goryeo to 1367. When Korea was colonized by Japan in 1910, Jeju-was called Saishu, that is the way to read the word Jeju hanja characters in Japanese. After the defeat of the Japanese, Jeju is officially became part of the new Republic of Korea, forming part of South Jeolla province until 1946, it became a new province. In the period from April 3, 1948 and on September 21, 1954, while the Government of Korea of the South under American supervision, a series of riots, occurred for the actions of the rebel army and government repression, which resulted in the death of several tens of thousands of people. These events are known as the Jeju uprising.

Geographical aspects

Jeju special autonomous province (hangul: 제주특별자치도, hanja: 濟州特別自治道, revised romanization: Jeju teukbyeoljachido, McCune-Reischauer: Cheju T 'ŭkpyŏlchach' gone)? It is the only special autonomous province of South Korea. Its territory comprises the greater size of the country, Jeju Island, island and lies in the Korea Strait, southwest of the South Jeolla province, of which it was part until 1946. Its capital is the city of Jeju.

Names

Throughout history, the island has received different names, such as:
  • DOI (도이, 島夷).
  • Dongyeongju (동영주, 東瀛州).
  • Juho (주호, 州胡).
  • Tammora (탐모라, 耽牟羅).
  • Seopra (섭라, 涉羅).
  • Takra (탁라, 竣羅).
  • Tamra (탐라, 耽羅).

Natural history

Jeju Island, formerly known in the West as Quelpart Island, is a volcanic island, dominated by Mount Halla, a volcano of 1950 m of height, which is the highest peak in South Korea.
The island was formed for hundreds of millions of years, as a result of volcanic eruptions, and consists primarily of basalt and lava. It has a subtropical, warmer climate than the rest of Korea, where he distinguished four seasons; part of the summer is rainy, and the winter is very dry.
It is considered one of the seven natural wonders of the world.

History


Waterfall in Jeju.

This territory was an independent country, known as Tamna, until the year 662, which became part of the protectorate of Chair. In 938, after the fall of Chair, Tamna becomes a protectorate of Goryeo. In 1105, Tamna loses its autonomy, and becomes a province of Goryeo. King Euijong de Goryeo changed the name of the island of Tamna by Jeju.
In 1271, Jeju was the basis of the Sambyeolcho rebellion against the Mongols; Sambyeolcho was defeated in 1273, and Jeju-do not returned to be part of Goryeo to 1367.
When Korea was colonized by Japan in 1910, Jeju-was called Saishu, that is the way to read the word Jeju hanja characters in Japanese. After the defeat of the Japanese, Jeju is officially became part of the new Republic of Korea, forming part of South Jeolla province until 1946, it became a new province.
In the period from April 3, 1948 and on September 21, 1954, while the Government of Korea of the South under American supervision, a series of riots, occurred for the actions of the rebel army and government repression, which resulted in the death of several tens of thousands of people. These events are known as the Jeju uprising.

Society and culture

In Jeju Island, there are cultural characteristics which distinguish its population from the rest of Korea, probably due to geographic isolation. There are thousands of local legends. The harubang ('grandparents of stone") are the cultural distinction clearer; It's sculptures in blocks of lava.

Harubang.


Landscape of Jeju-do.


Lakes in craters in Jeju.

Another distinctive characteristic of the province of Jeju is the matriarchal families, especially in Udo and Mara, but also present in the rest of the province. The best example referred to is that of the haenyo, (해녀, literally women of the sea), who make a living lung diving for mollusks such as abalone (family Hallotidae, of the class Gasteropoda) and shells (family Strombidae), among other products.

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