Saturday, July 25, 2015

Theocratic Ministry School Review | week beginning August 31, 2015

ADS

Study information for Theocratic Ministry School Review

The following questions will be considered at the Theocratic Ministry School during the week beginning August 31, 2015.

1. What faith-strengthening truths about Jehovah God do we find in Solomon’s prayer, and how will meditating on those truths benefit us? (1 Ki. 8:22-24, 28) [July 6, w05 7/1 p. 30 par. 3]

1 Kings 8:22-24

22 Then Solʹo•mon stood before the altar of Jehovah in front of all the congregation of Israel, and he spread his hands out to the heavens,+ 23 and he said: “O Jehovah the God of Israel, there is no God like you+ in the heavens above or on the earth beneath, keeping the covenant and showing loyal love+ to your servants who are walking before you with all their heart.+ 24 You have kept the promise that you made to your servant David my father. You made the promise with your own mouth, and this day you have fulfilled it with your own hand.+

1 Kings 8:28

28 Now pay attention to the prayer of your servant and to his request for favor, O Jehovah my God, and listen to the cry for help and to the prayer that your servant is praying before you today.

Highlights From the Book of First Kings

8:22-53. What heartfelt appreciation Solomon expressed for Jehovah—a God of loving-kindness, the Fulfiller of promises, and the Hearer of prayer! Meditating on the words of Solomon’s inauguration prayer will enhance our appreciation for these and other aspects of God’s personality.

2. How can David’s example of walking “with integrity of heart” encourage us to do the same? (1 Ki. 9:4) [July 13, w12 11/15 p. 7 pars. 18-19]

1 Kings 9:4

4 And you, if you walk before me as your father David walked,+ with integrity of heart+ and with uprightness,+ by doing everything I have commanded you,+ and you obey my regulations and my judgments,+

“Teach Me to Do Your Will”

18, 19. (a) Although he was imperfect, what helped David remain in God’s favor? (b) What is your determination?
18 Although David was exemplary in many ways, he committed several serious sins. (2 Sam. 11:2-4, 14, 15, 22-27; 1 Chron. 21:1, 7) Over the course of his life, however, David proved repentant when he sinned. He walked before God “with integrity of heart.” (1 Ki. 9:4) Why can we say that? Because David tried to act in accord with Jehovah’s will.
19 Despite our imperfection, we can remain in Jehovah’s favor. With that objective in mind, let us study God’s Word diligently, meditate deeply on what we learn from it, and act decisively on what we store in our heart. In effect, we will then be praying to Jehovah like the psalmist who made this humble request: “Teach me to do your will.”

3. What vital lesson can we draw from the account about Jehovah sending Elijah to the widow of Zarephath? (1 Ki. 17:8-14) [July 27, w14 2/15 p. 14]

1 Kings 17:8-14

8 The word of Jehovah then came to him: 9 “Rise up, go to Zarʹe•phath, which belongs to Siʹdon, and stay there. Look! I will command a widow there to supply you with food.”+ 10 So he rose up and went to Zarʹe•phath. When he came to the entrance of the city, there was a widow gathering pieces of wood. So he called to her and said: “Please, bring me a little water in a cup so that I may drink.”+ 11 As she went to get it, he called to her: “Please, bring me a piece of bread in your hand.” 12 At this she said: “As surely as Jehovah your God is living, I have no bread, only a handful of flour in the large jar and a little oil in the small jar.+ Now I am gathering a few pieces of wood, and I will go in and make something for me and my son. After we have eaten, we will die.”
13 Then E•liʹjah said to her: “Do not be afraid. Go in and do as you said. But first make me a small round loaf of bread with what is there, and bring it out to me. Then you can make something afterward for you and your son. 14 For this is what Jehovah the God of Israel says: ‘The large jar of flour will not run out, and the small jar of oil will not run dry until the day Jehovah makes it rain on the surface of the ground.’”+

The Widow of Zarephath Was Rewarded for Her Faith

Giving the stranger a drink did not trouble the widow, but giving him bread was a problem.
“As surely as Jehovah your God is living,” she replied, “I have no bread, only a handful of flour in the large jar and a little oil in the small jar. Now I am gathering a few pieces of wood, and I will go in and make something for me and my son. After we have eaten, we will die.” (1 Ki. 17:12) Let us reflect on what this exchange reveals.
The widow recognized Elijah as a God-fearing Israelite. This is evident from her words “as surely as Jehovah your God is living.” It appears that while she had some knowledge of Israel’s God, it was not to the point of using the words “my God” when referring to Jehovah. She lived in Zarephath, a town that ‘belonged to,’ or was apparently dependent upon, the Phoenician city of Sidon. Very likely, Zarephath was inhabited by Baal worshippers. Nevertheless, Jehovah had seen something exceptional in this widow.
Although the poor widow of Zarephath lived among idolaters, she exercised faith. Jehovah sent Elijah to her for the sake of both the woman and the prophet. From this, we can draw a vital lesson.
Not all the inhabitants of Baal-worshipping Zarephath were completely corrupt. By sending Elijah to this widow, Jehovah showed that He takes note of well-intentioned individuals who are not yet serving Him. Indeed, “in every nation the man who fears [God] and does what is right is acceptable to him.”—Acts 10:35.
How many people who live in your territory are like the widow of Zarephath? Although they may be surrounded by adherents of false religion, they may yearn for something better. They may have little or no knowledge of Jehovah and therefore need help if they are to embrace pure worship. Are you searching for and assisting such individuals?
‘FIRST MAKE ME A SMALL LOAF OF BREAD’
Consider carefully what Elijah asked the widow to do. She had just told him that after she made one more meal for her and her son, they would eat it and die. Yet, what did Elijah say? “Do not be afraid. Go in and do as you said. But first make me a small round loaf of bread with what is there, and bring it out to me. Then you can make something afterward for you and your son. For this is what Jehovah the God of Israel says: ‘The large jar of flour will not run out, and the small jar of oil will not run dry until the day Jehovah makes it rain on the surface of the ground.’”—1 Ki. 17:11-14.
‘Give away our last meal? You must be joking,’ some might have said. But that was not this widow’s reaction. Despite her limited knowledge of Jehovah, she believed Elijah and did what he asked of her. What a momentous test of faith that was—and what a wise decision she made!
God did not abandon that poor widow. Just as Elijah promised, Jehovah multiplied her meager supplies so that they sustained Elijah, the widow, and her son until the drought ended. Indeed, “the large jar of flour did not run out, and the small jar of oil did not run dry, according to Jehovah’s word

4. How can meditating on the account at 1 Kings 17:10-16 strengthen our determination to have complete confidence in Jehovah? [July 27, w14 2/15 pp. 13-15]

1 Kings 17:10-16

10 So he rose up and went to Zarʹe•phath. When he came to the entrance of the city, there was a widow gathering pieces of wood. So he called to her and said: “Please, bring me a little water in a cup so that I may drink.”+ 11 As she went to get it, he called to her: “Please, bring me a piece of bread in your hand.” 12 At this she said: “As surely as Jehovah your God is living, I have no bread, only a handful of flour in the large jar and a little oil in the small jar.+ Now I am gathering a few pieces of wood, and I will go in and make something for me and my son. After we have eaten, we will die.”
13 Then E•liʹjah said to her: “Do not be afraid. Go in and do as you said. But first make me a small round loaf of bread with what is there, and bring it out to me. Then you can make something afterward for you and your son. 14 For this is what Jehovah the God of Israel says: ‘The large jar of flour will not run out, and the small jar of oil will not run dry until the day Jehovah makes it rain on the surface of the ground.’”+ 15 So she went and did as E•liʹjah said, and she together with him and her household ate for many days.+ 16 The large jar of flour did not run out, and the small jar of oil did not run dry, according to Jehovah’s word that he had spoken through E•liʹjah.

The Widow of Zarephath Was Rewarded for Her Faith

The Widow of Zarephath Was Rewarded for Her Faith
A POOR widow hugs her boy, her only child. She cannot believe her eyes. Just a short time earlier, she had cradled his lifeless body in her arms in a tender embrace. Now the woman looks at her resurrected son and thrills to his smile. “See,” says her houseguest, “your son is alive.”
That dramatic resurrection took place almost 3,000 years ago. You can read about it in 1 Kings chapter 17. The houseguest is God’s prophet Elijah. And the mother? She is an unnamed widow living in the town of Zarephath. The resurrection of her son was one of the most faith-strengthening events in her life. As we focus on her, we will learn some weighty lessons.
ELIJAH FINDS A WIDOW WHO HAS FAITH
Jehovah had determined that there would be a long drought in the realm of Ahab, the wicked king of Israel. After Elijah announced the drought, God hid him from Ahab and miraculously fed the prophet with bread and meat brought to him by ravens. Jehovah then told Elijah: “Rise up, go to Zarephath, which belongs to Sidon, and stay there. Look! I will command a widow there to supply you with food.”—1 Ki. 17:1-9.
When Elijah arrived at Zarephath, he saw a poor widow collecting pieces of wood. Could she be the woman who would provide food for the prophet? How could she do so, since she herself was so poor? Despite any misgivings Elijah may have had, he began a conversation with the woman. “Please,” he said, “bring me a little water in a cup so that I may drink.” When she went to get him some water, Elijah added: “Please, bring me a piece of bread.” (1 Ki. 17:10, 11) Giving the stranger a drink did not trouble the widow, but giving him bread was a problem.
“As surely as Jehovah your God is living,” she replied, “I have no bread, only a handful of flour in the large jar and a little oil in the small jar. Now I am gathering a few pieces of wood, and I will go in and make something for me and my son. After we have eaten, we will die.” (1 Ki. 17:12) Let us reflect on what this exchange reveals.
The widow recognized Elijah as a God-fearing Israelite. This is evident from her words “as surely as Jehovah your God is living.” It appears that while she had some knowledge of Israel’s God, it was not to the point of using the words “my God” when referring to Jehovah. She lived in Zarephath, a town that ‘belonged to,’ or was apparently dependent upon, the Phoenician city of Sidon. Very likely, Zarephath was inhabited by Baal worshippers. Nevertheless, Jehovah had seen something exceptional in this widow.
Although the poor widow of Zarephath lived among idolaters, she exercised faith. Jehovah sent Elijah to her for the sake of both the woman and the prophet. From this, we can draw a vital lesson.
Not all the inhabitants of Baal-worshipping Zarephath were completely corrupt. By sending Elijah to this widow, Jehovah showed that He takes note of well-intentioned individuals who are not yet serving Him. Indeed, “in every nation the man who fears [God] and does what is right is acceptable to him.”—Acts 10:35.
How many people who live in your territory are like the widow of Zarephath? Although they may be surrounded by adherents of false religion, they may yearn for something better. They may have little or no knowledge of Jehovah and therefore need help if they are to embrace pure worship. Are you searching for and assisting such individuals?
‘FIRST MAKE ME A SMALL LOAF OF BREAD’
Consider carefully what Elijah asked the widow to do. She had just told him that after she made one more meal for her and her son, they would eat it and die. Yet, what did Elijah say? “Do not be afraid. Go in and do as you said. But first make me a small round loaf of bread with what is there, and bring it out to me. Then you can make something afterward for you and your son. For this is what Jehovah the God of Israel says: ‘The large jar of flour will not run out, and the small jar of oil will not run dry until the day Jehovah makes it rain on the surface of the ground.’”—1 Ki. 17:11-14.
‘Give away our last meal? You must be joking,’ some might have said. But that was not this widow’s reaction. Despite her limited knowledge of Jehovah, she believed Elijah and did what he asked of her. What a momentous test of faith that was—and what a wise decision she made!
God did not abandon that poor widow. Just as Elijah promised, Jehovah multiplied her meager supplies so that they sustained Elijah, the widow, and her son until the drought ended. Indeed, “the large jar of flour did not run out, and the small jar of oil did not run dry, according to Jehovah’s word that he had spoken through Elijah.” (1 Ki. 17:16; 18:1) If that woman had acted differently, the loaf of bread that she made from her meager supply of flour and oil may well have been her last meal. Instead, she acted in faith, trusted in Jehovah, and fed Elijah first.
A lesson that we can learn from this is that God blesses those who exercise faith. When you face a test of integrity and exercise faith, Jehovah will help you. He will be a Provider, a Protector, and a Friend in order to help you cope with your trial.—Ex. 3:13-15.
In 1898, Zion’s Watch Tower drew this lesson from the widow’s story: “If the woman had the faith necessary to obey, then she would be esteemed worthy of the Lord’s assistance through the Prophet; if she did not exercise the faith, another widow might have been found who would. Thus it is with us,—at various steps in the journey of life the Lord brings us to the place where he tests our faith. If we exercise the faith we will get the blessing; if we do not, we will lose it.”
When we face specific trials, we need to seek divine guidance from the Scriptures and from our Bible-based publications. Then we should act in harmony with Jehovah’s direction regardless of how difficult it may be to accept it. We will indeed be blessed if we act in harmony with this wise proverb: “Trust in Jehovah with all your heart, and do not rely on your own understanding. In all your ways take notice of him, and he will make your paths straight.”—Prov. 3:5, 6.
‘HAVE YOU COME TO PUT MY SON TO DEATH?’
The widow’s faith was about to undergo another test. “After these things,” says the Bible account, “the son of the woman who owned the house fell sick, and his sickness became so severe that he stopped breathing.” Searching for a reason for this tragedy, the grieving mother said to Elijah: “What do you have against me, O man of the true God? Have you come to remind me of my guilt and to put my son to death?” (1 Ki. 17:17, 18) What do those bitter words mean?
Had the woman recalled a sin that troubled her conscience? Did she think that her son’s death was divine retribution and that Elijah was God’s messenger of death? The Bible does not tell us, but one point is clear: The widow did not accuse God of any unrighteousness.
Elijah must have been shocked by the death of the widow’s son and by her idea that the prophet’s very presence was responsible for her heartbreaking bereavement. After carrying the boy’s limp body to the roof chamber, Elijah cried out: “O Jehovah my God, are you also bringing harm to the widow with whom I am staying by putting her son to death?” The prophet could not bear the thought that reproach would be cast on God’s name if He were to allow this kind and hospitable woman to suffer further. So Elijah begged: “O Jehovah my God, please, let this child’s life come back into him.”—1 Ki. 17:20, 21.
“SEE, YOUR SON IS ALIVE”
Jehovah was listening. The widow had provided for his prophet and had exercised faith. Apparently, God allowed the boy’s illness to take its course, knowing that a resurrection—the first one recorded in the Scriptures—would take place and would give hope to future generations. When Elijah entreated Him, Jehovah brought the child back to life. Just imagine the widow’s delight when Elijah said: “See, your son is alive”! The widow then told Elijah: “Now I know that you truly are a man of God and that Jehovah’s word in your mouth is truth.”—1 Ki. 17:22-24.
The account in 1 Kings chapter 17 says no more about this woman. In view of Jesus’ positive reference to her, however, she may have lived out her days as a faithful servant of Jehovah. (Luke 4:25, 26) Her story teaches us that God blesses those doing good to his servants. (Matt. 25:34-40) It proves that God provides for faithful ones, even in dire circumstances. (Matt. 6:25-34) This account also gives evidence of Jehovah’s desire and ability to resurrect the dead. (Acts 24:15) Surely these are excellent reasons for remembering the widow of Zarephath.

5. How can we benefit from the example that Elijah set in coping with feelings of desperation? (1 Ki. 19:4) [Aug. 3, ia pp. 102-103 pars. 10-12; w14 3/15 p. 15 pars. 15-16]

1 Kings 19:4

4 He went a day’s journey into the wilderness and came and sat down under a broom tree, and he asked that he* might die. He said: “It is enough! Now, O Jehovah, take my life* away,+ for I am no better than my forefathers.”

He Took Comfort in His God

10, 11. (a) What was the meaning of Elijah’s prayer to Jehovah? (b) Using the cited scriptures, describe the feelings of other godly individuals who became low in spirits.
10 Elijah prayed in utter desperation. He asked to die. He said: “I am no better than my forefathers.” He knew that his forefathers were then mere dust and bones in the grave, unable to do any good for anybody. (Eccl. 9:10) Elijah felt just as worthless. No wonder he cried out: “It is enough!” Why go on living?
11 Should it be shocking to learn that a man of God could become so low in spirits? Not necessarily. A number of faithful men and women in the Bible record are described as feeling so sad that they wished for death—among them Rebekah, Jacob, Moses, and Job.—Gen. 25:22; 37:35; Num. 11:13-15; Job 14:13.
12. If you ever find yourself feeling very low, in what respect should you follow Elijah’s example?
12 Today, we live in “critical times hard to deal with,” so it is not surprising that many people, even faithful servants of God, find themselves feeling low at times. (2 Tim. 3:1) If you ever find yourself in such a dire situation, follow Elijah’s example in this respect: Pour out your feelings to God. After all, Jehovah is “the God of all comfort.” (Read 2 Corinthians 1:3, 4.) Did he comfort Elijah?

How to Maintain a Positive Viewpoint

15. How did God assure Elijah that He still valued him?
15 But the Almighty saw Elijah differently. Elijah remained valuable in God’s eyes, and Jehovah took steps to assure him of that reality. God sent an angel to strengthen Elijah. Jehovah also provided food and drink that would sustain Elijah during his 40-day trip south to Mount Horeb. Moreover, God kindly corrected Elijah’s mistaken idea that no other Israelites had remained faithful to Jehovah. Significantly, God gave Elijah new assignments, which he accepted. Elijah benefited from Jehovah’s help, and he returned to his work as a prophet with renewed energy.—1 Ki. 19:5-8, 15-19.
16. What are some ways that God has likely sustained you?
16 Elijah’s experience can help you to verify that you are in the faith and can move you toward a positive viewpoint. First, think of the ways that Jehovah has sustained you. Might one of his servants, perhaps an elder or other mature Christian, have helped you at some point when you were in need? (Gal. 6:2) Have you been nourished spiritually by the Bible, our Christian publications, and the congregation meetings? The next time you benefit in one of these ways, consider the true Source of your help and offer a prayer of thanks to Him.—Ps. 121:1, 2.

6. How did Jehovah react when he saw his faithful prophet Elijah in despair, and how can we imitate our loving God? (1 Ki. 19:7, 8) [Aug. 3, w14 6/15 p. 27 pars. 15-16]

1 Kings 19:7, 8

7 Later the angel of Jehovah came back a second time and touched him and said: “Get up and eat, for the journey will be too much for you.” 8 So he got up and ate and drank, and in the strength of that nourishment he went on for 40 days and 40 nights until he reached Hoʹreb, the mountain of the true God.+

Do You View Human Weakness as Jehovah Does?

15 How did Jehovah feel when he looked down from heaven and saw his faithful prophet in despair? Did he reject his servant because he temporarily became depressed and lacked courage? Not at all! Jehovah took into account Elijah’s limitations and dispatched an angel. Twice the angel encouraged Elijah to eat. Thus, the next journey would not “be too much for [him].” (Read 1 Kings 19:5-8.) Yes, even before giving any directions, Jehovah listened to his prophet and took practical measures to sustain him.
16, 17. How can we imitate Jehovah’s care for Elijah?
16 How can we imitate our caring God? We should not be quick to offer advice. (Prov. 18:13) It would be better first to take the time to express our empathy to those who may think that they are “less honorable” because of their personal circumstances. (1 Cor. 12:23) Then we would be in a position to act appropriately, according to the true need.

7. What wrong view did King Ahab have, and how can Christians today avoid making a similar mistake? [Aug. 10, lv pp. 164-165, box; w14 2/1 p. 14 pars. 3-4]

Be Honest in All Things

SATANIC LIES REGARDING SERIOUS SINS
When it comes to serious sins, there are some dangerous lies that Satan would love for you to believe. Happily, Christians are not ignorant of the Devil’s “crafty acts.” (Ephesians 6:11) Consider three of such lies.
“Sins can be hidden.” In truth, Jehovah sees everything that we do. “All things are naked and openly exposed to the eyes of the one to whom we must give an account.” (Hebrews 4:13) Since Jehovah knows the facts and since we must give an account to him, why add to our guilt by attempting to hide a serious sin from his human servants?—See also 2 Samuel 12:12.
“The elders cannot be trusted, so don’t tell them anything.” Wicked King Ahab addressed Elijah this way: “O my enemy!” (1 Kings 21:20) As Jehovah’s prophet in Israel, Elijah could have helped Ahab gain forgiveness. In the Christian congregation, Jesus provides the elders as “gifts in men.” (Ephesians 4:8) Though imperfect, the elders are “keeping watch over” us, that is, looking out for our spiritual health and welfare. (Hebrews 13:17) They are not the enemy; they are Jehovah’s means of helping us.
“You protect a friend by helping him to conceal his sins.” The truth is, we would do a sinner great harm by helping to conceal his sins. Serious sins are signs of real spiritual illness; concealing them is like hiding serious symptoms from a qualified doctor. (James 5:14, 15) The sinner may fear the possibility of discipline; but discipline is an expression of Jehovah’s love, and it may well save the sinner’s life. (Proverbs 3:12; 4:13) Furthermore, the persistent sinner likely presents a real danger to others in the congregation. Would you want to assist in the spread of his wrong attitudes that led him into sin? (Leviticus 5:1; 1 Timothy 5:22) By all means, then, make sure that the erring one brings the matter to the attention of the congregation elders.

He Endured in the Face of Injustice

Ahab’s words reveal two kinds of folly. First, in saying, “So you have found me” to Elijah, Ahab revealed that he was spiritually blind. Jehovah had already “found” him. He had seen Ahab abuse the gift of free will and enjoy the fruitage of Jezebel’s wicked plot. God saw into Ahab’s heart, where love for a material possession had eclipsed any sense of mercy, justice, or compassion. Second, in saying to Elijah, “O my enemy!” Ahab revealed his hatred for a man who was a friend of Jehovah God and who could have helped Ahab turn from his disastrous course.
We may learn vital lessons from Ahab’s folly. We must ever remember that Jehovah God sees all. As a loving Father, he knows when we stray from the path of what is right, and he is eager to see us change our ways. To help us, he often uses his friends—faithful humans who, like Elijah, bear God’s words to their fellow humans. What a mistake it would be to view God’s friends as our enemies!—Psalm 141:5.

8. What can we learn from the request that Elisha made of Elijah, and how can this help us when we receive a new assignment in Kingdom service? (2 Ki. 2:9, 10) [Aug. 17, w03 11/1 p. 31 pars. 5-6]

2 Kings 2:9, 10

9 As soon as they had gone across, E•liʹjah said to E•liʹsha: “Ask what you want me to do for you before I am taken from you.” So E•liʹsha said: “Please, may I receive a double portion*+ of your spirit?”+ 10 He replied: “You have asked a difficult thing. If you see me when I am taken from you, it will happen for you that way; but if you do not, it will not happen.”

Questions From Readers

Elijah knew that Elisha had asked for something that was not his but only God’s to give. So Elijah modestly replied: “You have asked a difficult thing. If you see me when taken from you, it will happen to you that way.” (2 Kings 2:10) And, indeed, Jehovah allowed Elisha to see Elijah ascend in a windstorm. (2 Kings 2:11, 12) Elisha’s request was granted. Jehovah provided him with the spirit he needed to take on his new task and to face coming trials.
Today, anointed Christians (sometimes called the Elisha class) and God’s servants in general can draw much encouragement from this Bible account. At times, we may feel overwhelmed and inadequate in the face of a new assignment, or we may be losing some of our courage to continue with our Kingdom-preaching work as we face increasing indifference or opposition in our territory. Yet, if we beg Jehovah for his support, he will give us holy spirit as we need it to cope with challenges and changing circumstances. (Luke 11:13; 2 Corinthians 4:7; Philippians 4:13) Yes, just as Jehovah strengthened Elisha for his weightier responsibilities, he will help all of us, young and old, to accomplish our ministry.—2 Timothy 4:5.

9. How can young ones imitate the faith and courage of the little Israelite girl mentioned at 2 Kings 5:1-3? [Aug. 24, w12 2/15 pp. 12-13 par. 11]

2 Kings 5:1-3

5 Now Naʹa•man the army chief of the king of Syria was a prominent man who was held in esteem by his lord, because through him Jehovah had given victory* to Syria. He was a mighty warrior, although he was a leper.* 2 On one of their raids, the Syrians had taken captive from the land of Israel a little girl who became a servant to Naʹa•man’s wife. 3 She said to her mistress: “If only my lord would visit the prophet+ in Sa•marʹi•a! Then he would cure him of his leprosy.”+

“Be Courageous and Very Strong”

11. What effect did the courageous words of an Israelite girl have on one man’s life?
11 In the tenth century B.C.E., the courageous words of an Israelite girl proved to be a blessing for a leper. She had been captured by a marauding band and became a servant of the leprous Syrian army chief Naaman. Having learned about miracles that Jehovah performed through Elisha, she told Naaman’s wife that if her husband would go to Israel, God’s prophet would cure him. Naaman did go to Israel, was miraculously healed, and became a worshipper of Jehovah. (2 Ki. 5:1-3, 10-17) If you are a young person who loves God as that girl did, he can give you courage to witness to teachers, fellow students, and others.

10. What qualities of Jehu should all servants of Jehovah strive to emulate during this time of the end? (2 Ki. 10:16) [Aug. 31, w11 11/15 p. 5 par. 4]

2 Kings 10:16

16 Then he said: “Come along with me, and see my toleration of no rivalry toward* Jehovah.”+ So they had him ride with him in his war chariot.

Jehu Champions Pure Worship

No doubt you can see that circumstances faced by Christians today require that they manifest certain qualities possessed by Jehu. For instance, how should we react if tempted to engage in any activity that Jehovah condemns? We should be prompt, courageous, and dynamic in rejecting it. When it comes to our godly devotion, we cannot tolerate any rivalry toward Jehovah.

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