Didactic Encyclopedia


SEARCH CONTENTS

Custom Search

1 Chronicles 5-6-7, Bible Highlights: week starting october 12

ADS BY GOOGLE

Highlights From Bible Reading: 1 Chronicles 5-7. Information for personal study.

Read and listen to the reading of the Bible in JW.org:




Research for Highlights of : 1 Chronicles 5-7


(1 CHRONICLES 5:1)

“These are the sons of Reuʹben, Israel’s firstborn. He was the firstborn, but because he defiled the bed of his father, his right as firstborn was given to the sons of Joseph the son of Israel, so he was not enrolled genealogically for the right of the firstborn.”

*** w05 10/1 p. 9 par. 4 Highlights From the Book of First Chronicles ***
5:1, 2—What did receiving the right of the firstborn mean for Joseph? It meant that Joseph received a double portion of the inheritance. (Deuteronomy 21:17) He thus became the father of two tribes—Ephraim and Manasseh. The other sons of Israel fathered only one tribe each.

*** it-1 p. 1229 Israel ***
There was also the matter concerning the firstborn rights. Reuben, Jacob’s firstborn, was entitled to a double portion in the inheritance (compare De 21:17), but he forfeited this right by committing incestuous immorality with his father’s concubine. (Ge 35:22; 49:3, 4) These vacancies, the vacancy of Levi among the 12 as well as the absence of one with firstborn rights, had to be filled.
In a comparatively simple way Jehovah adjusted both matters by a single act. Joseph’s two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, were advanced to full status as tribal heads. (Ge 48:1-6; 1Ch 5:1, 2) Again 12 tribes exclusive of Levi could be numbered, and also a double portion of the land was representatively given to Joseph the father of Ephraim and Manasseh. In this way the firstborn rights were taken away from Reuben, the firstborn of Leah, and given to Joseph, the firstborn of Rachel. (Ge 29:31, 32; 30:22-24) Now with these adjustments the names of the 12 (non-Levite) tribes of Israel were Reuben, Simeon, Judah, Issachar, Zebulun, Ephraim, Manasseh, Benjamin, Dan, Asher, Gad, and Naphtali.—Nu 1:4-15.

(1 CHRONICLES 5:2)

“Though Judah was superior to his brothers and from him came the one to be the leader, the right as firstborn belonged to Joseph.”

*** w05 10/1 p. 9 par. 4 Highlights From the Book of First Chronicles ***
5:1, 2—What did receiving the right of the firstborn mean for Joseph? It meant that Joseph received a double portion of the inheritance. (Deuteronomy 21:17) He thus became the father of two tribes—Ephraim and Manasseh. The other sons of Israel fathered only one tribe each.

*** it-1 p. 1229 Israel ***
There was also the matter concerning the firstborn rights. Reuben, Jacob’s firstborn, was entitled to a double portion in the inheritance (compare De 21:17), but he forfeited this right by committing incestuous immorality with his father’s concubine. (Ge 35:22; 49:3, 4) These vacancies, the vacancy of Levi among the 12 as well as the absence of one with firstborn rights, had to be filled.
In a comparatively simple way Jehovah adjusted both matters by a single act. Joseph’s two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh, were advanced to full status as tribal heads. (Ge 48:1-6; 1Ch 5:1, 2) Again 12 tribes exclusive of Levi could be numbered, and also a double portion of the land was representatively given to Joseph the father of Ephraim and Manasseh. In this way the firstborn rights were taken away from Reuben, the firstborn of Leah, and given to Joseph, the firstborn of Rachel. (Ge 29:31, 32; 30:22-24) Now with these adjustments the names of the 12 (non-Levite) tribes of Israel were Reuben, Simeon, Judah, Issachar, Zebulun, Ephraim, Manasseh, Benjamin, Dan, Asher, Gad, and Naphtali.—Nu 1:4-15.

(1 CHRONICLES 5:6)

“and Be•erʹah his son, whom King Tilʹgath-pil•neʹser of As•syrʹi•a took into exile; he was a chieftain of the Reuʹben•ites.”

*** it-1 p. 204 Assyria ***
Earlier in his reign, Tiglath-pileser had inaugurated the policy of transplanting the populations of conquered areas in order to reduce the possibility of future uprisings, and he now proceeded to deport some of the Israelites. (1Ch 5:6, 26)

*** it-1 p. 276 Beerah ***
BEERAH
(Be•erʹah) [Well].
A Reubenite chieftain taken into exile by Assyrian King Tiglath-pileser III apparently during the reign of Pekah (c. 778-759 B.C.E.).—1Ch 5:6.

(1 CHRONICLES 5:9)

“To the east he settled as far as the beginning of the wilderness at the Eu•phraʹtes River, for their livestock had become numerous in the land of Gilʹe•ad.”

*** it-1 p. 768 Euphrates ***
First Chronicles 5:9 states that certain descendants of Reuben in the period prior to David’s reign extended their dwelling “as far as where one enters the wilderness at the river Euphrates.” However, since the Euphrates is some 800 km (500 mi) distant, when traveling “east of Gilead” (1Ch 5:10), this may mean simply that the Reubenites extended their territory E of Gilead into the edge of the Syrian Desert, which desert continues over to the Euphrates. (RS reads, “as far as the entrance of the desert this side of the Euphrates”; JB, “to the beginning of the desert that ends at the river Euphrates.”)

(1 CHRONICLES 5:10)

“In the days of Saul, they waged war against the Hagʹrites, who were defeated before them, so they dwelled in their tents throughout all the territory east of Gilʹe•ad.”

*** it-1 pp. 1019-1020 Hagrite ***
HAGRITE
(Hagʹrite) [possibly, Of (Belonging to) Hagar].
Apparently a pastoral people residing in tents E of Gilead. In the days of King Saul, the Israelites living E of the Jordan defeated the Hagrites, taking 100,000 captives, as well as thousands of camels, asses, and sheep. (1Ch 5:10, 18-22) The psalmist listed the Hagrites among other enemies of Israel, such as the Edomites, Moabites, Ammonites, and Amalekites. (Ps 83:2-7) However, during David’s rule, Jaziz the Hagrite was in charge of the royal flocks.—1Ch 27:31.
Many scholars believe that the Hagrites are probably the same as the A•graiʹoi mentioned by the ancient geographers Strabo, Ptolemy, and Pliny. Whether they were descendants of Hagar cannot be definitely established.

(1 CHRONICLES 5:16)

“They lived in Gilʹe•ad, in Baʹshan and its dependent towns, and in all the pastures of Sharʹon as far as they extended.”

*** it-2 p. 584 Pasture Grounds ***
Pasture grounds were mentioned in 1 Chronicles 5:16 in connection with “Sharon,” which some believe to have been a region or town E of the Jordan.

*** it-2 p. 911 Sharon ***
2. According to 1 Chronicles 5:16, the tribe of Gad dwelt in “Gilead, in Bashan and in its dependent towns and in all the pasture grounds of Sharon.” Some scholars think that this means that Gadites grazed their flocks in the coastal plains of Sharon. However, Gad received territory E of the Jordan, and both Gilead and Bashan are on that side. Thus many conclude that there was also a region in Gad’s territory called Sharon.

(1 CHRONICLES 5:20)

“And they were helped in fighting them, so that the Hagʹrites and all who were with them were given into their hand, for they called to God for help in the war, and he responded to their entreaty because they trusted in him.”

*** w05 10/1 p. 9 par. 7 Highlights From the Book of First Chronicles ***
5:10, 18-22. In the days of King Saul, the tribes east of the Jordan defeated the Hagrites even though these tribes were outnumbered more than 2 to 1. This was because the valiant men of these tribes trusted in Jehovah and looked to him for help. Let us have complete confidence in Jehovah as we carry on our spiritual warfare against formidable odds.—Ephesians 6:10-17.

(1 CHRONICLES 5:23)

“The descendants of the half tribe of Ma•nasʹseh lived in the land from Baʹshan to Baʹal-herʹmon and Seʹnir and Mount Herʹmon. They were numerous.”

*** it-1 p. 232 Baal-hermon ***
BAAL-HERMON
(Baʹal-herʹmon) [Owner of Hermon].
This name appears at Judges 3:3 and 1 Chronicles 5:23. In the first instance it describes a point in the region inhabited by the Sidonians and the Hivites who remained unconquered by the Israelites, and it is here referred to as “Mount Baal-hermon.” It is usually identified with Mount Hermon itself but may refer to the Anti-Lebanon Range in general or to some portion thereof. At 1 Chronicles 5:23 “Baal-hermon” is used along with Senir and Mount Hermon and the region of Bashan to outline the territory occupied by the half tribe of Manasseh. While it may refer to a town or place near Mount Hermon, it may likewise be a designation for the mountainous region of Hermon.—See HERMON.

(1 CHRONICLES 5:26)

“So the God of Israel stirred up the spirit of King Pul of As•syrʹi•a (that is, King Tilʹgath-pil•neʹser of As•syrʹi•a) so that he took into exile those of the Reuʹben•ites, the Gadʹites, and the half tribe of Ma•nasʹseh and brought them to Haʹlah, Haʹbor, Haʹra, and the river Goʹzan, where they are until this day.”

*** it-1 p. 204 Assyria ***
Tiglath-pileser III. The first Assyrian king to be mentioned by name in the Bible is Tiglath-pileser III (2Ki 15:29; 16:7, 10), also called “Pul” at 2 Kings 15:19. At 1 Chronicles 5:26 both names are used, and this caused some in the past to view them as separate kings. However, Babylonian and Assyrian King Lists give both names to the same individual. The suggestion is made by some that this king was originally known as Pul and that he assumed the name Tiglath-pileser upon ascending to the Assyrian throne.—See PUL No. 1.

*** it-1 p. 204 Assyria ***
Earlier in his reign, Tiglath-pileser had inaugurated the policy of transplanting the populations of conquered areas in order to reduce the possibility of future uprisings, and he now proceeded to deport some of the Israelites. (1Ch 5:6, 26)

*** it-1 p. 418 Captivity ***
Ezra, when compiling Chronicles, wrote that many of those dispersed in various eastern cities “continue until this day” (c. 460 B.C.E.). (1Ch 5:26)

*** it-1 p. 993 Gozan ***
At 2 Kings 17:6 and 18:11 some translations read “Habor, the river of Gozan” (AS, RS), instead of “Habor at [or, by] the river Gozan” (NW, Yg), thus also making Gozan a place in these texts. But the rendering “Habor, the river of Gozan,” does not harmonize with 1 Chronicles 5:26. In this passage Habor is listed between Halah and Hara; and Hara, not Habor, is listed before Gozan. This indicates that Habor and “the river of Gozan” (AS) are not synonymous. Hence, those who identify Gozan as a place throughout are obliged to reject the Chronicles reference. However, since the Hebrew allows for a consistent rendering of “river Gozan” in all three texts, there is reason to believe that it was in the vicinity of a river called Gozan that the king of Assyria settled some of the exiled Israelites of the northern kingdom. The Qezel Owzan of NW Iran has been suggested as a possible identification of “the river Gozan.” It rises in the mountains SE of Lake Urmia (in what used to be the land of the Medes) and finally empties as the Sefid Rud or White River (the name applied to its lower course) into the SW section of the Caspian Sea. According to another view, the Gozan is a river of Mesopotamia.

*** it-1 p. 1014 Habor ***
HABOR
(Haʹbor).
A city or district to which the Assyrian king Tiglath-pileser III exiled numerous Israelites of the ten-tribe kingdom. (1Ch 5:26) Some scholars have linked this Habor with Abhar, a town located on the Qezel Owzan River of NW Iran about 210 km (130 mi) W of Tehran. At 2 Kings 17:6 and 18:11 some favor the reading “Habor, the river of Gozan” (AS, RS), and they suggest identifying the Habor with a tributary of the Euphrates, the Khabur River of SE Turkey and NE Syria. However, in agreement with 1 Chronicles 5:26, this phrase may instead be translated “Habor at [or, by] the river Gozan.”—NW, Yg; see GOZAN.

*** it-1 p. 1034 Hara ***
HARA
(Haʹra).
A site to which Assyrian King Tilgath-pilneser (Tiglath-pileser III) transported Israelite captives. (1Ch 5:26) Similar references (2Ki 17:6; 18:11) to a later Assyrian exile tell of Israelites’ being taken to “the cities of the Medes” (Masoretic text) or “the mountains of the Medes.” (LXX) Many scholars feel that the Septuagint reading may be the correct one and suggest that at 1 Chronicles 5:26 “Hara” (Ha•raʼʹ, perhaps an Aramaic form of the Hebrew word for “mountain” [har]) became a proper name when the phrase “of the Medes” was inadvertently omitted. If this assumption is correct, “Hara” may have applied to “the mountains of the Medes” E of the Tigris River valley. However, some who consider the Gozan of 2 Kings 17:6 and 18:11 to be a place (as in JB, RS) and not a river believe that “Hara” possibly was a local designation for a mountainous region in Turkey.

*** it-2 p. 30 Jeremiah ***
4. One of the heads of paternal houses in the section of the tribe of Manasseh E of the Jordan in the days of the kings. The Reubenites, the Gadites, and the half tribe of Manasseh E of the Jordan (among them being this Jeremiah’s descendants) “began to act unfaithfully toward the God of their forefathers and went having immoral intercourse with the gods of the peoples of the land, whom God had annihilated from before them. Consequently the God of Israel stirred up the spirit of Pul the king of Assyria even the spirit of Tilgath-pilneser the king of Assyria, so that [in the days of Pekah, king of Israel] he took into exile those of the Reubenites and of the Gadites and of the half tribe of Manasseh and brought them to Halah and Habor and Hara and the river Gozan.”—1Ch 5:23-26; 2Ki 15:29.

*** it-2 p. 714 Pul ***
1. The name given a king of Assyria at 2 Kings 15:19 and 1 Chronicles 5:26. During the reign of Menahem, king of Israel, Pul entered Palestine and received tribute from Menahem. The identity of Pul was long an open question. However, most scholars now conclude that Pul and Tiglath-pileser III of Assyria were the same, since the name Pulu (Pul) is found in the dynastic tablet known as the Babylonian King List A, whereas in the corresponding location in the “Synchronistic Chronicle” the name Tukultiapilesharra (Tiglath-pileser) is listed. (Ancient Near Eastern Texts, edited by J. Pritchard, 1974, pp. 272, 273) Perhaps “Pul” was his personal name or the name he was known by in Babylon, while Tiglath-pileser (Tilgath-pilneser) was the name he assumed when he became king of Assyria. With this understanding, 1 Chronicles 5:26 may be read to refer to the same individual in saying, “Pul the king of Assyria even . . . Tilgath-pilneser the king of Assyria.”—See TIGLATH-PILESER (III).

*** it-2 p. 1101 Tiglath-pileser (III) ***
This king first appears in the Bible account as “Pul.” (2Ki 15:19) First Chronicles 5:26 also states that God “stirred up the spirit of Pul the king of Assyria even the spirit of Tilgath-pilneser the king of Assyria, so that he took into exile” peoples of certain tribes of Israel. The ancient secular records apply both names to the same individual, the name “Pulu” appearing in what is known as “The Babylonian King List A,” while “The Synchronistic Chronicle” lists “Tukultiapilesharra” (Tiglath-pileser). (Ancient Near Eastern Texts, edited by J. Pritchard, 1974, pp. 272, 273) It is also of note that, in the Hebrew, the above-quoted scripture uses the verb “took” in the singular rather than in the plural. It is commonly suggested that “Pul” was the monarch’s personal name and that he assumed the name “Tiglath-pileser” (the name of an earlier and famous Assyrian king) upon ascending the throne.
It appears that during the early part of his reign, Tiglath-pileser III was occupied in hammering out stronger borders for the empire in the S, E, and N. The menacing shadow of Assyria, however, soon loomed large over the lands of Syria and Palestine to the W.
The Assyrian inscriptions prominently mention Azriau of Ia-ú-da-a-a (Judah) in connection with a campaign by Tiglath-pileser III in Syria. (Ancient Near Eastern Texts, pp. 282, 283) This would seem to be a reference to King Azariah of Judah, more commonly known as Uzziah (829-778 B.C.E.), but the matter is a debated one, because some hold that the small kingdom of Samʼal in Syria was on occasion also called Judah. The likelihood of such a pagan king having a name including the name of Jah (the abbreviated form of Jehovah) and living at the same time as the Judean king of the same name seems slight; however, the Bible does not mention Tiglath-pileser III in connection with Azariah (Uzziah), and the Assyrian records are considerably mutilated.
During the reign of King Menahem of Israel (c. 790-781 B.C.E.), Tiglath-pileser III (Pul) advanced into Palestine, and Menahem sought the Assyrian’s favor by paying him tribute to the amount of “a thousand talents of silver” ($6,606,000 in current values). Temporarily appeased, Tiglath-pileser withdrew his forces. (2Ki 15:19, 20) The Assyrian documents refer to Me-ni-hi-im-me (Menahem), along with Rezon (Rezin) of Damascus and Hiram of Tyre, as tributary to Tiglath-pileser.
Subsequently, in the time of King Ahaz of Judah (761-746 B.C.E.), King Pekah of Israel formed a confederation with King Rezin of Damascus and attacked Judah. (2Ki 16:5, 6; Isa 7:1, 2) Though assured by the prophet Isaiah that within a short time the two conspiring kingdoms would be wiped off the scene, King Ahaz chose to send a bribe to Tiglath-pileser to come to his rescue. (2Ki 16:7, 8; Isa 7:7-16; 8:9-13) An Assyrian inscription describes the tribute paid by Ia-u-ha-zi (Jehoahaz, or Ahaz) of Judah and other kings of that area as follows: “gold, silver, tin, iron, antimony, linen garments with multicolored trimmings, garments of their native (industries) (being made of) dark purple wool . . . all kinds of costly objects be they products of the sea or of the continent, the (choice) products of their regions, the treasures of (their) kings, horses, mules (trained for) the yoke.” (Ancient Near Eastern Texts, p. 282) The aggressive Assyrian responded to Ahaz’ urging by invading Israel, capturing several northern cities, and overrunning the regions of Gilead, Galilee, and Naphtali, carrying many off into exile. (2Ki 15:29; 1Ch 5:6, 26) Damascus was attacked and fell to the Assyrian forces, and its King Rezin was slain. Here at Damascus, Tiglath-pileser III received the visit of King Ahaz of Judah, coming either to express gratitude or submission to Assyria.—2Ki 16:9-12.
Isaiah had been inspired to foretell that Jehovah would use the king of Assyria like “a hired razor” to “shave” the kingdom of Judah. (Isa 7:17, 20) Whether the “hired razor” referred specifically to Tiglath-pileser III, whom Ahaz bribed, or not, the record does show that he caused great distress to the Judean king and that Ahaz’ bribe proved to be “of no assistance to him.” (2Ch 28:20, 21) This may have marked the initial phase of the “flood” of Assyrian invasion of Judah, which eventually was to ‘reach up to the very neck of the kingdom,’ as it clearly did in Hezekiah’s time.—Isa 8:5-8; 2Ki 18:13, 14.
Tiglath-pileser III, in his inscriptions, says concerning the northern kingdom of Israel: “They overthrew their king Pekah (Pa-qa-ha) and I placed Hoshea (A-ú-si-ʼ) as king over them. I received from them 10 talents of gold [$3,853,500], 1,000(?) talents of silver [$6,606,000] as their [tri]bute and brought them to Assyria.” (Ancient Near Eastern Texts, p. 284) Thus the Assyrian king assumes credit for the assumption of the kingship of Israel by Hoshea following his conspiratorial assassination of Hoshea’s predecessor, Pekah (c. 758 B.C.E.).—2Ki 15:30.

(1 CHRONICLES 6:8)

“A•hiʹtub became father to Zaʹdok; Zaʹdok became father to A•himʹa•az.”

*** it-1 p. 224 Azariah ***
4. One of Solomon’s princes. (1Ki 4:2) He is referred to as the son of Priest Zadok; he may be the brother of Ahimaaz.—1Ch 6:8.

(1 CHRONICLES 6:22)

“The sons of Koʹhath were Am•minʹa•dab his son, Korʹah his son, Asʹsir his son,”

*** it-1 p. 92 Amminadab ***
2. Perhaps an alternative name for Izhar, a son of Kohath and father of Korah. (1Ch 6:22; compare vss 2, 18, 37, 38; Ex 6:18, 21; Nu 3:19, 27.) Some copies of the Greek Septuagint give “Izhar” instead of “Amminadab” at 1 Chronicles 6:22 (6:7, LXX).

*** it-1 p. 909 Genealogy ***
Identification of Relationships. In determining relationships, often the context or a comparison of parallel lists or of texts from different parts of the Bible is necessary. For example, “son” may actually mean a grandson or merely a descendant. (Mt 1:1) Again, a list of names may appear to be a register of brothers, the sons of one man. On closer observation and by comparison with other texts, however, it may prove to be the register of a genealogical line, naming some sons and also some grandsons or later descendants. Genesis 46:21 evidently lists both sons and grandsons of Benjamin as “sons,” as can be seen by a comparison with Numbers 26:38-40.
The above situation is found even in the genealogies of some major families. For example, 1 Chronicles 6:22-24 lists ten “sons of Kohath.” But in the 18th verse, and at Exodus 6:18, we find only four sons attributed to Kohath. And examination of the context shows that the listing of “sons of Kohath” at 1 Chronicles 6:22-24 is in reality part of a genealogy of families of the line of Kohath who had representative members present for appointment by David to certain temple duties.

(1 CHRONICLES 6:27)

“E•liʹab his son, Je•roʹham his son, El•kaʹnah his son.”

*** it-1 p. 707 Eliab ***
3. A Levite of the family of Kohathites and an ancestor of Samuel the prophet. (1Ch 6:22, 27, 28, 33, 34) His name is given as Eliel at 1 Chronicles 6:34 and as Elihu at 1 Samuel 1:1.

*** it-1 p. 709 Eliel ***
2. A Levite of the family of the Kohathites and an ancestor of the prophet Samuel. (1Ch 6:33, 34) He evidently is called Elihu in 1 Samuel 1:1 and Eliab in 1 Chronicles 6:27.

*** it-1 p. 710 Elihu ***
2. An ancestor of the prophet Samuel; the son of Tohu. (1Sa 1:1) Elihu is evidently also called Eliab and Eliel.—1Ch 6:27, 34.

(1 CHRONICLES 6:28)

“The sons of Samuel were Joel the firstborn and A•biʹjah the second.”

*** it-2 p. 85 Joel ***
5. The firstborn son of the prophet Samuel; a descendant of No. 2 and father of Heman the Levitical singer. (1Ch 6:28, 33, 36; 15:17) Joel and his younger brother Abijah had been appointed by their father to be judges, but their dishonesty in office gave the people an excuse to ask for a human king.—1Sa 8:1-5.
At 1 Chronicles 6:28 the Masoretic text (and certain translations) says “Vashni” was Samuel’s firstborn. Scholars, however, generally agree that “Joel” was in the original Hebrew, a reading retained by the Syriac Peshitta and the Lagardian edition of the Greek Septuagint. (Compare 1Sa 8:2.) Similarity between “Joel” and the ending of a preceding word in the text (“Samuel”) possibly caused a scribe inadvertently to drop the name “Joel” altogether. Seemingly, he then mistook the Hebrew word wehash•she•niʹ (meaning “and the second [son]”) for the proper name “Vashni” and inserted the letter waw (and) before the name Abijah.

(1 CHRONICLES 6:34)

“son of El•kaʹnah son of Je•roʹham son of Eʹli•el son of Toʹah”

*** it-1 p. 707 Eliab ***
3. A Levite of the family of Kohathites and an ancestor of Samuel the prophet. (1Ch 6:22, 27, 28, 33, 34) His name is given as Eliel at 1 Chronicles 6:34 and as Elihu at 1 Samuel 1:1.

*** it-1 p. 709 Eliel ***
2. A Levite of the family of the Kohathites and an ancestor of the prophet Samuel. (1Ch 6:33, 34) He evidently is called Elihu in 1 Samuel 1:1 and Eliab in 1 Chronicles 6:27.

*** it-1 p. 710 Elihu ***
2. An ancestor of the prophet Samuel; the son of Tohu. (1Sa 1:1) Elihu is evidently also called Eliab and Eliel.—1Ch 6:27, 34.

(1 CHRONICLES 6:69)

“Aiʹja•lon with its pastures, and Gath-rimʹmon with its pastures;”

*** it-1 pp. 67-68 Aijalon ***
After Joshua’s conquest of Canaan, Aijalon was assigned to the tribe of Dan. (Jos 19:40-42) It was later assigned to the sons of Kohath as a Levite city.—Jos 21:24.
The Danites at first proved unable to oust the Amorites from Aijalon, but it appears that Ephraim from the N came to their aid and “the hand of the house of Joseph got to be so heavy that they [the Amorites] were forced into task work.” (Jg 1:34, 35) This may be the reason 1 Chronicles 6:69 lists Aijalon as belonging to Ephraim and as given by them to the Kohathites. (See, however, the corresponding case of GATH-RIMMON No. 1.)

*** it-1 p. 900 Gath-rimmon ***
GATH-RIMMON
(Gath-rimʹmon) [Winepress by the Pomegranate Tree].
1. A city of Dan (Jos 19:40, 41, 45) assigned to the Kohathite Levites. (Jos 21:20, 23, 24) First Chronicles 6:66-70 appears to make Gath-rimmon an Ephraimite city. However, on the basis of the parallel account at Joshua 21:23, 24, Hebrew scholars believe that, because of scribal error, a portion of the text has accidentally dropped out and been lost. So, they suggest inserting the following (corresponding to Jos 21:23) before 1 Chronicles 6:69: “And from the tribe of Dan, Elteke and its pasture ground, Gibbethon and its pasture ground . . . ” This could have been the original reading. However, not to be overlooked is the possibility that Gath-rimmon was a Danite enclave city located within Ephraim’s territory.

(1 CHRONICLES 6:70)

“and from half of the tribe of Ma•nasʹseh, Aʹner with its pastures and Bilʹe•am with its pastures, to the rest of the families of the Koʹhath•ites.”

*** it-1 p. 900 Gath-rimmon ***
GATH-RIMMON
(Gath-rimʹmon) [Winepress by the Pomegranate Tree].
1. A city of Dan (Jos 19:40, 41, 45) assigned to the Kohathite Levites. (Jos 21:20, 23, 24) First Chronicles 6:66-70 appears to make Gath-rimmon an Ephraimite city. However, on the basis of the parallel account at Joshua 21:23, 24, Hebrew scholars believe that, because of scribal error, a portion of the text has accidentally dropped out and been lost. So, they suggest inserting the following (corresponding to Jos 21:23) before 1 Chronicles 6:69: “And from the tribe of Dan, Elteke and its pasture ground, Gibbethon and its pasture ground . . . ” This could have been the original reading. However, not to be overlooked is the possibility that Gath-rimmon was a Danite enclave city located within Ephraim’s territory.

*** it-1 p. 1166 Ibleam ***
IBLEAM
(Ibʹle•am) [possibly from a root meaning “swallow down”].
A city in the territory of Issachar but assigned with its dependent towns to Manasseh. The Manassites, however, failed to dispossess the Canaanites from Ibleam. (Jos 17:11-13; Jg 1:27) Ibleam appears to be the same as the Bileam in Manasseh given to the Kohathite Levites. (1Ch 6:70) But the parallel passage mentioning Levite cities in the territory of the half tribe of Manasseh (Jos 21:25) reads “Gath-rimmon” instead of “Bileam” or “Ibleam.” Generally this is attributed to scribal error, “Gath-rimmon,” the name of a city in Dan, probably having been inadvertently repeated from verse 24.

(1 CHRONICLES 7:6)

“The sons of Benjamin were Beʹla, Beʹcher, and Je•diʹa•el—three.”

*** it-1 p. 189 Ashbel ***
ASHBEL
(Ashʹbel), Ashbelites (Ashʹbel•ites).
Ashbel was a son of Benjamin, listed third at Genesis 46:21, but second at 1 Chronicles 8:1. In 1728 B.C.E. he came into Egypt with Jacob’s family. He appears to be called Jediael at 1 Chronicles 7:6, 10.

(1 CHRONICLES 7:14)
“The sons of Ma•nasʹseh: Asʹri•el, whom his Syrian concubine bore. (She bore Maʹchir the father of Gilʹe•ad.”


*** it-1 p. 195 Asriel ***
According to 1 Chronicles 7:14, Asriel was a son of Manasseh born to him by his Syrian concubine. However, part of an apparent parenthetical statement that follows reads: “She bore Machir the father of Gilead.” Hence, as is not uncommon in Biblical genealogies, Asriel may here be termed a “son” of Manasseh only in the sense of being one of his later descendants (through Machir, Manasseh’s son by his Syrian concubine). But it is possible that Manasseh had both a direct son and a great-grandson bearing the same name. “The sons of Asriel” were among the descendants of Manasseh to whom Joshua made territorial allotments in the Promised Land.—Jos 17:1-4.

(1 CHRONICLES 7:20)

“The sons of Eʹphra•im were Shuʹthe•lah, Beʹred his son, Taʹhath his son, E•le•aʹdah his son, Taʹhath his son,”

*** it-1 p. 704 Elead ***
ELEAD
(Eʹle•ad) [God Has Borne Witness].
Likely, son of Ephraim who was killed along with his brother Ezer by the men of Gath “because they came down to take their livestock.”—1Ch 7:20, 21; see EPHRAIM No. 1.

(1 CHRONICLES 7:24)

“And his daughter was Sheʹe•rah, who built Lower and Upper Beth-hoʹron and Uzʹzen-sheʹe•rah.”

*** it-2 p. 1145 Uzzen-sheerah ***
UZZEN-SHEERAH
(Uzʹzen-sheʹe•rah) [possibly, Ear of Sheerah].
A city that Sheerah, an Ephraimite woman, built. In what sense she ‘built’ is not stated; perhaps this was in the sense of her contributing in some major way to the progress and development of it as well as other places listed. (1Ch 7:22-24) Uzzen-sheerah’s location is not definitely known. However, some geographers identify it with Beit Sira, about 4 km (2 mi) W of the suggested site of Lower Beth-horon and about 21 km (13 mi) NW of Jerusalem.

Click on the image to Download complete information into digital files for Desktop Computer, Laptop,Tablet, Mobile & Smartphone

Download information for the personal Studio for Desktop Computer, Laptop,Tablet, Mobile & Smartphone

Download information for the personal Studio for Desktop Computer, Laptop, Tablet, Mobile & Smartphone


SEARCH CONTENTS

Custom Search

ADD THIS