1 Chronicles 26-27-28-29, Bible Highlights: week starting november 16

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Highlights From Bible Reading: 1 Chronicles 26-29. Information for personal study.

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Research for Highlights of : 1 Chronicles 26-29


(1 CHRONICLES 26:16)

“Shupʹpim and Hoʹsah had theirs to the west, near the Shalʹlech•eth Gate by the highway that goes up, guard group corresponding to guard group;”

*** it-2 p. 938 Shuppim ***
2. A gatekeeper appointed to the W of the sanctuary. (1Ch 26:16) Since the last three characters of his name in Hebrew (Shup•pimʹ) are identical to the last three characters of the previous term (behth ha•ʼasup•pimʹ), scholars suspect that it is a dittograph (an unintentional scribal repetition), therefore, in this verse, not the name of a person.—Compare 1Ch 26:10, 11.

(1 CHRONICLES 26:29)

“Of the Izʹhar•ites, Chen•a•niʹah and his sons were assigned outside administrative duties as officers and as judges over Israel.”

*** it-1 p. 430 Chenaniah ***
2. A Kohathite of the family of Izhar. Chenaniah and his sons had been designated for “the outside business,” evidently consisting of service as judges and officers, of whom there were 6,000 at the time of David’s numbering the Levites. (1Ch 26:29; 23:1-4, 12)

(1 CHRONICLES 26:30)

“Of the Hebʹron•ites, Hash•a•biʹah and his brothers, 1,700 capable men, were over the administration of Israel in the region west of the Jordan for all the work of Jehovah and for the king’s service.”

*** it-1 p. 48 Administration ***
The Hebrew word translated “administration” in 1 Chronicles 26:30 (pequd•dahʹ) comes from the root pa•qadhʹ, meaning “visit; turn attention to.” (Ru 1:6, ftn) It is also rendered “care; oversight.”—2Ch 24:11; Nu 3:32; compare 2Ki 11:18, ftn; see OVERSEER.

(1 CHRONICLES 27:1)

“This is the number of Israelites, the heads of the paternal houses, the chiefs of the thousands and of the hundreds, and their officers who ministered to the king in every matter of the divisions that would come in and go out month by month during all the months of the year; there were 24,000 in each division.”

*** it-1 p. 174 Army ***
However, David instituted some novel plans of his own. A system of monthly rotation provided 12 groups of 24,000 (a total of 288,000), so that a soldier normally served only one month a year. (1Ch 27:1-15) This does not mean that all 24,000 for one month came from the same tribe, but, rather, each tribe furnished its share of the monthly quota throughout the year.

(1 CHRONICLES 27:6)

“This Be•naiʹah was a mighty warrior of the thirty and in charge of the thirty, and over his division was his son Am•mizʹa•bad.”

*** it-1 p. 92 Ammizabad ***
AMMIZABAD
(Am•mizʹa•bad) [My People Have Endowed].
Son of Benaiah, who was King David’s mighty man over the 30 outstanding fighters. Ammizabad acted for his father, Benaiah, in overseeing the third royal service group, for the third month of the year.—1Ch 27:5, 6.

(1 CHRONICLES 27:7)

“The fourth for the fourth month was Asʹa•hel, Joʹab’s brother, and his son Zeb•a•diʹah after him, and 24,000 were in his division.”

*** it-1 p. 185 Asahel ***
At 1 Chronicles 27:7 Asahel is listed as a divisional commander of the month-by-month arrangement of troops. Since Asahel died before David became king over all Israel, his mention here may be rather with reference to his house, represented in his son Zebadiah, who is referred to in the text as Asahel’s successor. A further suggestion is that given by The Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible (edited by G. A. Buttrick, 1962, Vol. 1, p. 244): “It is possible that we may have here the prototype of the Davidic militia, organized early in the Judean rule of the king, and that this original list has been brought up to date by the inclusion of Zebadiah, son and successor of Asahel in this command.”—Compare 1Ch 12.

(1 CHRONICLES 27:24)

“Joʹab the son of Ze•ruʹiah had started to take the count, but he did not finish; and God’s anger came against Israel because of this, and the number was not entered into the account of the history of the times of King David.”

*** it-2 p. 766 Registration ***
No doubt because the making of the count was wrong, it was not entered into “the account of the affairs of the days of King David.”—1Ch 27:24.

(1 CHRONICLES 27:32)

“Jonʹa•than, David’s nephew, was an adviser, a man of understanding and a secretary, and Je•hiʹel the son of Hachʹmo•ni looked after the king’s sons.”

*** it-2 p. 103 Jonathan ***
7. A man of understanding, a secretary and a counselor for King David. (1Ch 27:32) In the Masoretic text Jonathan’s relationship to David is indicated by the Hebrew word dohdh, which generally means “uncle.” But in view of two references in the Scriptures to a nephew of David named Jonathan, it is likely that the word is here used in the wider sense of “relative,” here being “brother’s son” or “nephew.” (Ro; AS, ftn; NW) He would thus be the same as No. 4.

(1 CHRONICLES 28:5)

“And of all my sons—for Jehovah has given me many sons—he chose my son Solʹo•mon to sit on the throne of the kingship of Jehovah over Israel.”

*** it-2 p. 157 King ***
Divinely appointed representatives. Jehovah appointed the kings of his people, and they were to act as his royal agents, sitting, not on their own thrones, but on “the throne of the kingship of Jehovah,” that is, as representatives of his theocratic rule. (1Ch 28:5; 29:23)

(1 CHRONICLES 28:9)

““And you, Solʹo•mon my son, know the God of your father and serve him with a complete heart and with a delightful soul, for Jehovah searches through all hearts, and he discerns every inclination of the thoughts. If you search for him, he will let himself be found by you, but if you leave him, he will reject you forever.”

*** cl chap. 24 p. 242 par. 7 Nothing Can “Separate Us From God’s Love” ***
King David told his son Solomon: “All hearts Jehovah is searching, and every inclination of the thoughts he is discerning.” (1 Chronicles 28:9) As God searches through billions of human hearts in this violent, hate-filled world, how delighted he must be when he comes upon a heart that loves peace, truth, and righteousness!

*** w10 11/1 p. 30 “He Will Let Himself Be Found by You” ***
Draw Close to God
“He Will Let Himself Be Found by You”
1 CHRONICLES 28:9
DO YOU know God? Answering that question is not as simple as it may seem. Truly knowing God involves becoming thoroughly familiar with his will and ways. We thereby develop a closeness with him that profoundly affects our entire way of life. Is such closeness really possible? If so, how do we find it? The answers can be discerned in King David’s advice to his son Solomon, found at 1 Chronicles 28:9.
Imagine the scene. David has ruled Israel for nearly 40 years, and the nation has prospered under his rule. Solomon, who will soon succeed him, is very young. (1 Chronicles 29:1) What parting counsel does David give his son?
Speaking from his own rich experience in serving God, David begins: “Solomon my son, know the God of your father.” David must mean something more than having head knowledge. Solomon is already a worshipper of David’s God, Jehovah. About a third of the Hebrew Scriptures have been completed, and Solomon is no doubt aware of what these sacred writings say about God. One scholar says that the Hebrew word rendered “know” can refer to “the most intimate acquaintance.” Yes, David wants his son to cultivate what David himself has treasured—a close personal relationship with God.
Such closeness should deeply affect Solomon’s outlook and way of life. David exhorts his son: “Serve him [God] with a complete heart and with a delightful soul.” Note that the charge to serve God comes after the admonition to know him. Truly knowing God leads to serving him. But he is not to be served with halfhearted hesitancy or doublehearted hypocrisy. (Psalm 12:2; 119:113) David implores his son to serve God wholeheartedly and willingly.
Why does David urge his son to worship with the right motive and thinking? David explains: “For all hearts Jehovah is searching, and every inclination of the thoughts he is discerning.” Solomon must not serve God just to please his father, David. God is looking for those whose hearts are sincerely inclined toward Him.
Will Solomon follow his father’s example and draw close to Jehovah? That is up to Solomon. David tells his son: “If you search for him, he will let himself be found by you; but if you leave him, he will cast you off forever.” To become a worshipper who is close to God, Solomon must put forth real effort to come to know Jehovah.
David’s fatherly advice assures us that Jehovah wants us to become close to him. But to develop that closeness, we need to “search for him,” digging into the Scriptures in an effort to come to know him intimately. Knowing him should move us to serve him wholeheartedly and willingly. Jehovah desires—and deserves—nothing less from his worshippers.—Matthew 22:37.
[Footnotes]
Some translations here read: “Serve him with a whole heart and with a willing mind.”
Sadly, although Solomon did start out serving with a complete heart, he did not remain faithful.—1 Kings 11:4.

*** w08 10/15 p. 7 Jehovah’s “Beaming Eyes” Examine All ***
Maintain a Complete Heart
18 To his son Solomon, King David said: “Know the God of your father and serve him with a complete heart and with a delightful soul; for all hearts Jehovah is searching, and every inclination of the thoughts he is discerning.” (1 Chron. 28:9) David wanted his son to do more than merely believe in God. He wanted Solomon to appreciate the depth of Jehovah’s interest in His servants. Do you appreciate Jehovah in that way?

*** w05 2/15 p. 19 par. 9 Safeguarding Our Christian Identity ***
Solomon’s own father, David, exhorted him to “know the God of your father and serve him with a complete heart.” (1 Chronicles 28:9) It would not be enough for young Solomon to watch how his own father built faith in Jehovah. He had to get to know Jehovah for himself, and he did. He beseeched God: “Give me now wisdom and knowledge that I may go out before this people and that I may come in.”—2 Chronicles 1:10.

*** g90 10/8 pp. 24-25 Why Should I Study the Bible? ***
Says 1 Chronicles 28:9: “If you search for him, he will let himself be found by you.” This implies digging into the Scriptures in an effort to know Jehovah intimately.
Have you done so? For example, can you explain why the Bible speaks of Jehovah as having “eyes,” “ears,” a “face,” and an “arm”? (1 Peter 3:12; Ezekiel 20:33) Does not the Bible say that “God is a Spirit”? (John 4:24) Or are you aware of the extent to which God has the ability to observe you, to know what you are about to say even before you say it? (Psalm 139:4) And what about Jehovah’s cardinal attributes of love, wisdom, justice, and power? Can you explain what the greatest manifestation of God’s love was? (John 3:16) Do you know the difference between God’s spirit and his power? (Micah 3:8) Can you prove that God has feelings—and that it is possible to hurt his feelings?—Psalm 78:40.
There is only one way to answer those questions—by studying the Bible. Young Luther has learned that “by studying His Word, I can ‘see’ Jehovah’s personality and the type of person he is.” (Compare Job 42:5.) Jaquella has similarly come to know God better. By a study of the Bible, she has come to appreciate “that Jehovah can back up what he says. When he promises something, he doesn’t break his promise; he doesn’t lie.”—Titus 1:2.

*** w89 5/1 p. 19 par. 6 Worship the Creator, Not The Creation ***
6 The willingness to search for Jehovah is what separates sheeplike people from goatlike ones. “If you search for him, he will let himself be found by you; but if you leave him, he will cast you off forever.” (1 Chronicles 28:9) Thus, no matter what a person’s race or nationality, whatever his education, whether rich or poor, if he sincerely searches for the truth about God, he will find it. From their heavenly vantage point, Christ and his angels will see to it that the searcher comes in contact with the truth, no matter where that person lives.

(1 CHRONICLES 28:11)

“David then gave to his son Solʹo•mon the architectural plan of the porch and of its houses, its storerooms, its roof chambers, its inner rooms, and the house of the propitiatory cover.”

*** it-1 p. 159 Architecture ***
He was also used to provide the divinely inspired “architectural plan” for the entire temple layout and equipment. (1Ch 28:11, 19) The Hebrew word for “architectural plan” (tav•nithʹ) comes from the root ba•nahʹ (“build”; 1Ch 22:11) and is elsewhere rendered “pattern” and “representation.”—Ex 25:9; 1Ch 28:18.

*** it-2 p. 699 Propitiatory Cover ***
In 1 Chronicles 28:11 the Most Holy, the innermost compartment of the temple, is referred to as “the house of the kap•poʹreth.” In this instance the Hebrew word is evidently not used simply as designating a lid, or cover, for a chest, but is employed with regard to the special function of the cover in the propitiation of sins. Accordingly, the expression is rendered “the house of the atonement” (Yg), “the house of propitiation” (AT), “the house of the propitiatory cover” (NW).

(1 CHRONICLES 28:12)

“He gave him the architectural plan of everything that had been conveyed to him through inspiration for the courtyards of Jehovah’s house, for all the dining rooms around it, for the treasuries of the house of the true God, and for the treasuries of the things made holy;”

*** it-2 p. 1021 Spirit ***
The spirit has qualifying force or capacity; it can qualify persons for a work or for an office. Though Bezalel and Oholiab may have had knowledge of crafts before their appointment in connection with the making of the tabernacle equipment and priestly garments, God’s spirit ‘filled them with wisdom, understanding, and knowledge’ so that the work could be done in the way purposed. It heightened whatever natural abilities and acquired knowledge they already had, and it enabled them to teach others. (Ex 31:1-11; 35:30-35) The architectural plans for the later temple were given to David by inspiration, that is, through the operation of God’s spirit, thus enabling David to undertake extensive preparatory work for the project.—1Ch 28:12.

(1 CHRONICLES 28:18)

“He also gave the weight for the refined gold for the incense altar and for the representation of the chariot, namely, the cherubs of gold that spread their wings out and overshadow the ark of the covenant of Jehovah.”

*** it-1 p. 432 Cherub ***
In symbol, the cherubs served as “the representation of the chariot” of Jehovah upon which he rode (1Ch 28:18), and the wings of the cherubs offered both guarding protection and swiftness in travel. So David, in poetic song, described the speed with which Jehovah came to his aid, like one who “came riding upon a cherub and came flying” even “upon the wings of a spirit.”—2Sa 22:11; Ps 18:10.

(1 CHRONICLES 28:19)

“David said: “The hand of Jehovah was upon me, and he gave me insight to put all the details of the architectural plan in writing.””

*** it-1 p. 159 Architecture ***
He was also used to provide the divinely inspired “architectural plan” for the entire temple layout and equipment. (1Ch 28:11, 19) The Hebrew word for “architectural plan” (tav•nithʹ) comes from the root ba•nahʹ (“build”; 1Ch 22:11) and is elsewhere rendered “pattern” and “representation.”—Ex 25:9; 1Ch 28:18.

(1 CHRONICLES 29:1)

“King David now said to all the congregation: “My son Solʹo•mon, the one whom God has chosen, is young and inexperienced, and the work is great, for it is not a temple for man but for Jehovah God.”

*** it-1 p. 422 Castle ***
Writing in the language of his day, Ezra records David’s calling Solomon’s temple a “castle” when he encouraged the people fully to support its construction.—1Ch 29:1, 19.

(1 CHRONICLES 29:4)

“including 3,000 talents of gold from Oʹphir and 7,000 talents of refined silver, for coating the walls of the houses,”

*** it-1 p. 502 Contribution ***
King David’s contributions for the construction of the prospective temple included his “special property” of gold and silver, to the amount of more than $1,202,000,000. In turn, the princes and the chiefs of the people happily contributed over $1,993,000,000, in gold and silver, besides copper, iron, and stones.—1Ch 29:1-9.

*** it-1 p. 590 David ***
Out of his personal fortune David contributed gold of Ophir and refined silver valued at more than $1,202,000,000. David also provided the architectural plans, received by inspiration, and organized the tens of thousands of Levites into their many divisions of service, including a great chorus of singers and musicians.—1Ch 23:1–29:19; 2Ch 8:14; 23:18; 29:25; Ezr 3:10.

*** it-2 p. 558 Ophir ***
David donated 3,000 talents of gold from Ophir for construction of the temple, gold valued at $1,156,050,000. (1Ch 29:1, 2, 4)

(1 CHRONICLES 29:5)

“the gold for the goldwork and the silver for the silverwork, and for all the work to be done by the craftsmen. Now who volunteers to come forward today with a gift in hand for Jehovah?””

*** w90 7/1 p. 31 Honor Jehovah With Your Riches ***
Anyone Can ‘Fill His Hand’ With a Gift
Is giving limited to the spiritual area? No. When King David of old was making preparations for building the temple, he asked: “Who is there volunteering to fill his hand today with a gift for Jehovah?” (1 Chronicles 29:5) Anyone could do so. Similarly today, young or old, in good health or not, many wish to make a voluntary material contribution to further the Kingdom interests. It may be done through the branch office of one’s country or through the local congregation. In this way anyone may, according to his ability, help bear the expense of seeing that the good news is preached in all the inhabited earth. It is a privilege.—2 Corinthians 9:8-12.

(1 CHRONICLES 29:7)

“And they gave to the service of the house of the true God: 5,000 talents of gold, 10,000 darics, 10,000 talents of silver, 18,000 talents of copper, and 100,000 talents of iron.”

*** nwt p. 1696 Glossary ***
Daric. A Persian gold coin weighing 8.4 g (0.27 oz t). (1Ch 29:7)—See App. B14.

*** nwt p. 1794 B14-B Currency and Weight ***
Daric (Persian, gold)
8.4 g / 0.27 oz t
Ezra 8:27

*** w09 8/1 p. 30 How Much Should I Donate? ***
For example, when King David planned to build a temple for Jehovah, his subjects donated “gold worth five thousand talents.” (1 Chronicles 29:7)

*** w09 8/1 p. 30 How Much Should I Donate? ***
In 2008, the average price of gold was $871 an ounce, making this contribution worth some $4,794,855,000.

*** it-1 p. 502 Contribution ***
King David’s contributions for the construction of the prospective temple included his “special property” of gold and silver, to the amount of more than $1,202,000,000. In turn, the princes and the chiefs of the people happily contributed over $1,993,000,000, in gold and silver, besides copper, iron, and stones.—1Ch 29:1-9.

*** it-1 p. 580 Daric ***
At 1 Chronicles 29:7 one of the figures for temple contributions during David’s reign is stated in terms of darics, although the Persian daric was unknown in David’s time. Evidently the writer of Chronicles converted the original figure into terms then current and familiar to his readers.—Ezr 8:27.

*** it-1 p. 1216 Iron ***
Later, however, King David gathered together huge quantities of iron for use in the temple construction. Under Solomon’s reign there was contributed “iron worth a hundred thousand talents,” or, according to many translations, “a hundred thousand talents of iron.” (1Ch 22:14, 16; 29:2, 7) If the reference is to the value of the iron and if the talents were silver, then the iron was worth $660,600,000. If the reference is to the weight of the iron, then it amounted to about 3,420 metric tons (3,770 tons).

(1 CHRONICLES 29:14)

““And yet, who am I and who are my people that we should be in a position to make voluntary offerings like this? For everything is from you, and we have given to you what comes from your own hand.”

*** it-1 p. 935 Gifts, Presents ***
By reason of his creatorship, Jehovah owns everything. Therefore, in giving material things for the furtherance of true worship, the giver is merely returning a portion of what he originally received from God.—Ps 50:10; 1Ch 29:14.

(1 CHRONICLES 29:19)

“And give a complete heart to my son Solʹo•mon, so that he may observe your commandments, your reminders, and your regulations and do all these things and build the temple for which I have made preparation.””

*** it-1 p. 422 Castle ***
Writing in the language of his day, Ezra records David’s calling Solomon’s temple a “castle” when he encouraged the people fully to support its construction.—1Ch 29:1, 19.

(1 CHRONICLES 29:23)

“And Solʹo•mon sat on Jehovah’s throne as king in place of David his father, and he was successful, and all the Israelites were obedient to him.”

*** g89 2/22 p. 18 Part 4—1513-607 B.C.E.—A Nation Set Apart, Unlike All Others ***
Not until almost 400 years later was a dynasty of human kings introduced. But even then, the nation was unique. Its king did not claim to be God or a descendant of God as, for example, the Pharaohs of Egypt did. Israel’s kings simply sat upon “Jehovah’s throne” in a representative way.—1 Chronicles 29:23.

*** it-1 p. 132 Appointed Times of the Nations ***
Jerusalem was the capital of the nation of Israel, whose kings of the line of David were said to “sit upon Jehovah’s throne.” (1Ch 29:23) As such, it represented the seat of the divinely constituted government or typical kingdom of God operating through the house of David.

*** it-2 p. 157 King ***
Divinely appointed representatives. Jehovah appointed the kings of his people, and they were to act as his royal agents, sitting, not on their own thrones, but on “the throne of the kingship of Jehovah,” that is, as representatives of his theocratic rule. (1Ch 28:5; 29:23)

*** it-2 p. 163 Kingdom of God ***
The kings thereafter appointed by Jehovah were to serve as God’s earthly agents, not diminishing in the least Jehovah’s own sovereignty over the nation. The throne was actually Jehovah’s, and they sat thereon as deputy kings. (1Ch 29:23) Jehovah commanded the anointing of the first king, Saul (1Sa 9:15-17), at the same time exposing the lack of faith the nation had displayed.—1Sa 10:17-25.
For the kingship to bring benefits, both king and nation must now respect God’s authority. If they unrealistically looked to other sources for direction and protection, they and their king would be swept away. (De 28:36; 1Sa 12:13-15, 20-25) The king was to avoid reliance on military strength, the multiplying of wives for himself, and being dominated by the lust for wealth. His kingship was to operate entirely within the framework of the Law covenant. He was under divine orders to write his own copy of that Law and read it daily, that he might keep a proper fear of the Sovereign Authority, stay humble, and hold to a righteous course. (De 17:16-20) To the extent that he did this, loving God wholeheartedly and loving his neighbor as himself, his rule would bring blessings, with no real cause for complaint due to oppression or hardship. But, as with the people, so now with their kings, Jehovah allowed the rulers to demonstrate what their hearts contained, their willingness or unwillingness to recognize God’s own authority and will.

*** it-2 p. 213 Law ***
Jehovah was identified in the Law as absolute Sovereign and also as King in a special way. Since Jehovah was both God and King of Israel, disobedience to the Law was both a religious offense and lèse-majesté, an offense against the Head of State, which in this case was against the King Jehovah. David, Solomon, and their successors on the throne of Judah were said to sit on “Jehovah’s throne.” (1Ch 29:23)

*** it-2 p. 826 Ruler ***
The kings of the line of David on the throne of Israel ruled as representatives of Jehovah, their real, invisible King. They were, therefore, said to be God’s anointed, sitting on “Jehovah’s throne.” (1Ch 29:23)

*** it-2 p. 1097 Throne ***
Jehovah extended his throne to earth in a typical, specific way in his dealings with the sons of Israel. Since the one ruling in Israel was to be “a king whom Jehovah your God will choose,” who would rule in Jehovah’s name over Jehovah’s people and according to Jehovah’s law, his throne was really “Jehovah’s throne.”—De 17:14-18; 1Ch 29:23.

(1 CHRONICLES 29:29)

“As for the history of King David, from beginning to end, it is written among the words of Samuel the seer, Nathan the prophet, and Gad the visionary,”

*** w09 3/15 p. 32 Questions From Readers ***
For example, 1 Chronicles 29:29 mentions “the words of Samuel the seer,” “the words of Nathan the prophet,” and “the words of Gad the visionary.” Those three could constitute a collective reference to books we know as 1 and 2 Samuel, or perhaps the book of Judges.

*** it-2 pp. 890-891 Seer ***
SEER
Evidently a man enabled by God to discern the divine will, one having such insight; one whose eyes had been unveiled, as it were, to see or understand things that were not open to men in general. The Hebrew word ro•ʼehʹ, translated “seer,” is drawn from a root word meaning “see,” literally or figuratively. The seer was a man consulted by others for wise counsel on problems encountered. (1Sa 9:5-10) The Bible names Samuel (1Sa 9:9, 11, 18, 19; 1Ch 9:22; 29:29), Zadok (2Sa 15:27), and Hanani (2Ch 16:7, 10) as seers.
The designations “seer,” “prophet,” and “visionary” are closely related in the Scriptures. The distinction between the terms may be that “seer” may relate to discernment, “visionary” to the manner in which the divine will was made known, and “prophet” more to the speaking forth or the proclamation of the divine will. Samuel, Nathan, and Gad are all called prophets (1Sa 3:20; 2Sa 7:2; 24:11), but 1 Chronicles 29:29 indicates a distinction between the three terms when it says, “among the words of Samuel the seer and among the words of Nathan the prophet and among the words of Gad the visionary.”
First Samuel 9:9 states: “The prophet of today used to be called a seer in former times.” This may have been because toward the close of the days of the Judges and during the reigns of the kings of Israel (which began in the days of Samuel) the prophet as a public proclaimer of God’s will came to be more prominent. Samuel is commonly called the first of the line of men called “the prophets.”—Ac 3:24; 13:20; see PROPHET.

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