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2 Chronicles 1-2-3-4-5, Bible Highlights: week starting november 23

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Highlights From Bible Reading: 2 Chronicles 1-5. Information for personal study.

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(2 CHRONICLES 1:11)

“Then God said to Solʹo•mon: “Because this is your heart’s desire and you have not asked for wealth, riches, and honor or for the death of those hating you, nor have you asked for a long life, but you have asked for wisdom and knowledge to judge my people over whom I have made you king,”

*** w05 12/1 p. 19 par. 6 Highlights From the Book of Second Chronicles ***
1:11, 12. Solomon’s request showed Jehovah that gaining wisdom and knowledge was close to the king’s heart. Our prayers to God indeed reveal what is close to our heart. We are wise to analyze their content.

(2 CHRONICLES 1:17)

“Each chariot imported from Egypt cost 600 silver pieces, and a horse cost 150; in turn, they would export them to all the kings of the Hitʹtites and the kings of Syria.”

*** it-1 p. 1145 Horse ***
During Solomon’s reign, royal merchants trafficked in horses and chariots. The price of a horse was 150 silver pieces ($330, if the silver pieces were shekels), and the price of a chariot was 600 silver pieces (c. $1,320, if shekels).—1Ki 10:28, 29; 2Ch 1:16, 17.

(2 CHRONICLES 2:8)

“And send me timbers of cedar, juniper, and algum from Lebʹa•non, for I well know that your servants are experienced at cutting down the trees of Lebʹa•non. My servants will work along with your servants”

*** it-1 p. 72 Algum ***
ALGUM
[Heb., ʼal•gum•mimʹ (2Ch 2:8; 9:10, 11); ʼal•mug•gimʹ (1Ki 10:11, 12)].
A tree included by Solomon in his request to Hiram of Tyre for timbers for the construction of the temple and from which stairs and supports as well as harps and stringed instruments were constructed.
The algum tree of this account cannot be identified with certainty. It is traditionally suggested to be the red sandalwood (Pterocarpus santalinus) now found in India and Sri Lanka, although some favor the white sandalwood (Santalum album), perhaps because of Josephus’ statement that it is whitish in color. (Jewish Antiquities, VIII, 177 [vii, 1]) The red sandalwood grows to heights of about 7.5 to 9 m (25 to 30 ft) and has a hard, fine-grained, reddish-brown wood that takes a high polish. It is suggested as suitable for musical instruments of the type mentioned in the Bible account. The wood has a sweet scent and is highly resistant to insects.
The red sandalwood does not grow in Lebanon at the present time. However, the record is not definite whether the “algum” trees were native to Lebanon or not. At any rate, Hiram later saw fit to bring them from Ophir, and here again, the timbers may have been imports even in Ophir, as it was in position to act as a trading center dealing with India, Egypt, and other places in Africa. (1Ki 10:11, 22) The rarity and preciousness of the wood delivered by Hiram is indicated by the statement that “timbers of algum trees like this have not come in nor have they been seen down to this day.”—1Ki 10:12.

(2 CHRONICLES 2:10)

“Now look! I will supply the food for your servants, the woodcutters who cut down the trees: 20,000 cors of wheat, 20,000 cors of barley, 20,000 baths of wine, and 20,000 baths of oil.””

*** it-1 p. 256 Barley ***
Solomon provided 20,000 cor measures (4,400 kl; 125,000 bu) of barley, along with a corresponding quantity of wheat, and large amounts of oil and wine to Hiram as supplies for the Tyrian king’s servants who were preparing temple materials. (2Ch 2:10, 15)

(2 CHRONICLES 2:13)

“Now I am sending a skilled craftsman, endowed with understanding, Hiʹram-aʹbi,”

*** it-1 p. 1122 Hiram-abi ***
HIRAM-ABI
(Hiʹram-aʹbi) [Hiram My Father].
An appellation applied to the “skillful man” whom the king of Tyre sent to make the furnishings of Solomon’s temple. It evidently indicated that Hiram was “father” in the sense of being a master workman.—2Ch 2:13; see HIRAM No. 2.

*** it-1 pp. 1121-1122 Hiram ***
2. The skilled artisan who made many of the furnishings of Solomon’s temple. His father was a Tyrian, but his mother was a widow “from the tribe of Naphtali” (1Ki 7:13, 14) “of the sons of Dan.” (2Ch 2:13, 14) This apparent difference resolves itself if we take the view, as some scholars do, that she was born of the tribe of Dan, had been widowed by a first husband of the tribe of Naphtali, and then was remarried to a Tyrian.
Hiram, the king of Tyre (No. 1), sent this Hiram to supervise the special construction for Solomon because of his ability and experience in working with materials such as gold, silver, copper, iron, stone, and wood. Hiram was also unusually skilled in dyeing, engraving, and designing all sorts of devices. No doubt from childhood on he received some of his technical training in the industrial arts of the times from his Tyrian father, who himself was an accomplished craftsman in copper.—1Ki 7:13-45; 2Ch 2:13, 14; 4:11-16.
The king of Tyre apparently refers to this man as Hiram-abi, which seems to be an appellation literally meaning “Hiram My Father.” (2Ch 2:13) By this the king did not mean that Hiram was his literal father but, perhaps, that he was the king’s “counselor” or “master workman.”

(2 CHRONICLES 2:14)

“who is the son of a Danʹite woman but whose father was a man of Tyre; he has experience in working in gold, silver, copper, iron, stones, timbers, purple wool, blue thread, fine fabric, and crimson. He can do every sort of engraving and make any design he is given. He will work with your own skilled craftsmen and the skilled craftsmen of my lord David your father.”

*** w05 12/1 p. 19 par. 1 Highlights From the Book of Second Chronicles ***
2:14—Why is the lineage of the craftsman described here different from the one found at 1 Kings 7:14? First Kings refers to the craftsman’s mother as “a widowed woman from the tribe of Naphtali” because she had married a man of that tribe. She herself, though, was from the tribe of Dan. After her husband’s death, she married a man of Tyre, and the artisan was an offspring of that marriage.

*** it-1 pp. 1121-1122 Hiram ***
2. The skilled artisan who made many of the furnishings of Solomon’s temple. His father was a Tyrian, but his mother was a widow “from the tribe of Naphtali” (1Ki 7:13, 14) “of the sons of Dan.” (2Ch 2:13, 14) This apparent difference resolves itself if we take the view, as some scholars do, that she was born of the tribe of Dan, had been widowed by a first husband of the tribe of Naphtali, and then was remarried to a Tyrian.
Hiram, the king of Tyre (No. 1), sent this Hiram to supervise the special construction for Solomon because of his ability and experience in working with materials such as gold, silver, copper, iron, stone, and wood. Hiram was also unusually skilled in dyeing, engraving, and designing all sorts of devices. No doubt from childhood on he received some of his technical training in the industrial arts of the times from his Tyrian father, who himself was an accomplished craftsman in copper.—1Ki 7:13-45; 2Ch 2:13, 14; 4:11-16.

(2 CHRONICLES 2:16)

“And we will cut down trees from Lebʹa•non, as many as you need, and we will bring them to you as rafts by sea to Jopʹpa; and you will take them up to Jerusalem.””

*** w89 9/1 p. 16 Joppa—Notable Ancient Harbor ***
When offering to aid Solomon in building the temple, Hiram the king of Tyre said: “We shall bring [trees from Lebanon] to you as rafts by sea to Joppa, and you, for your part, will take them up to Jerusalem.” (2 Chronicles 2:1, 11, 16) These rafts may have left from the Phoenician ports of Tyre or Sidon. (Isaiah 23:1, 2; Ezekiel 27:8, 9) Passing Carmel, the cedar-tree rafts landed at Joppa. From there the cedars could be moved to Jerusalem, 34 miles [55 km] east/southeast.

(2 CHRONICLES 2:18)

“So he assigned 70,000 of them as common laborers, 80,000 as stonecutters in the mountains, and 3,600 as overseers for putting the people to work.”

*** w05 12/1 p. 19 par. 2 Highlights From the Book of Second Chronicles ***
2:18; 8:10—These verses state that the number of deputies serving as overseers and as foremen over the labor force was 3,600 plus 250, whereas according to 1 Kings 5:16; 9:23, they numbered 3,300 plus 550. Why do the numbers differ? The difference seems to be in the way the deputies are classified. It may be that Second Chronicles differentiates between 3,600 non-Israelites and 250 Israelite deputies, while First Kings distinguishes 3,300 foremen from 550 chief supervisors of higher rank. In any case, the total number of those serving as deputies was 3,850.

*** it-1 p. 615 Deputy ***
“Princely deputies” also served as foremen and overseers of the labor force engaged in construction during Solomon’s reign. It seems that the two accounts of these deputies in First Kings and Second Chronicles differed only in methods of classification, the first listing 3,300 plus 550 for a total of 3,850 (1Ki 5:16; 9:23), and the second giving 3,600 plus 250, which also totals 3,850. (2Ch 2:18; 8:10) Scholars (Ewald, Keil, Michaelis) suggest that the Chronicles figures distinguish between the 3,600 non-Israelite and the 250 Israelite deputies, whereas in Kings the distinction in deputies is between 3,300 subordinate foremen and 550 chief supervisors, this latter figure including 300 non-Israelites.

(2 CHRONICLES 3:1)

“Then Solʹo•mon started to build the house of Jehovah in Jerusalem on Mount Mo•riʹah, where Jehovah had appeared to his father David, in the place that David had prepared on the threshing floor of Orʹnan the Jebʹu•site.”

(2 CHRONICLES 3:3)

“And the foundation that Solʹo•mon laid for building the house of the true God was 60 cubits long and 20 cubits wide, according to the former measurement.”

*** it-2 p. 1077 Temple ***
Length of “cubit” used. In the following discussion of the measurements of the three temples—built by Solomon, Zerubbabel, and Herod—we shall calculate them on the basis of the cubit of 44.5 cm (17.5 in.). However, it is possible that they used the longer cubit of about 51.8 cm (20.4 in.).—Compare 2Ch 3:3 (which mentions a “length in cubits by the former measurement,” this perhaps being a longer measure than the cubit that came to be commonly in use) and Eze 40:5; see CUBIT.

(2 CHRONICLES 3:4)

“The porch in front was 20 cubits long, corresponding to the width of the house, and its height was 120; and he overlaid it inside with pure gold.”

*** it-2 p. 654 Porch ***
Solomon’s Temple. While the primary portions of the temple were the Holy and Most Holy compartments, in front of the Holy (toward the E) there was a massive porch that served as an entranceway to the temple. The porch was 20 cubits (8.9 m; 29.2 ft) long (running along the width of the temple) and 10 cubits (4.5 m; 14.6 ft) deep. (1Ki 6:3) It was 120 cubits (53.4 m; 175 ft) high. Second Chronicles 3:4 presents the height of the porch in the context of other measurements for the house, measurements that are generally accepted and that harmonize with those in First Kings. (Compare 2Ch 3:3, 4 with 1Ki 6:2, 3, 17, 20.) Thus the porch would have appeared as a tall, evidently rectangular, tower that extended high above the rest of the temple building.

(2 CHRONICLES 3:6)

“Further, he overlaid the house with beautiful precious stones; and the gold he used was gold from Par•vaʹim.”

*** it-2 p. 75 Jewels and Precious Stones ***
When Solomon built the temple, he “overlaid the house with precious stone for beauty,” or studded it with precious stones.—2Ch 3:6.

(2 CHRONICLES 4:1)

“Then he made the copper altar, 20 cubits long, 20 cubits wide, and 10 cubits high.”

*** it-1 p. 83 Altar ***
Temple Altars. Prior to the dedication of Solomon’s temple, the copper altar made in the wilderness served for Israel’s sacrificial offerings at the high place in Gibeon. (1Ki 3:4; 1Ch 16:39, 40; 21:29, 30; 2Ch 1:3-6) The copper altar thereafter made for the temple covered an area 16 times as large as the one made for the tabernacle, measuring about 8.9 m (29.2 ft) square and about 4.5 m (14.6 ft) high. (2Ch 4:1) In view of its height, some means of approach was essential. God’s law prohibited the use of steps to the altar to prevent exposure of nakedness. (Ex 20:26) Some believe that the linen drawers worn by Aaron and his sons served to obviate this command and thus made steps allowable. (Ex 28:42, 43) However, it seems likely that an inclined ramp was used to approach the top of the altar of burnt offering. Josephus (The Jewish War, V, 225 [v, 6]) indicates that such an approach was used for the temple altar later built by Herod. If the arrangement of the altar of the temple followed that of the tabernacle, the ramp was probably on the S side of the altar. “The molten sea,” where the priests washed, would thus be convenient, as it also lay toward the south. (2Ch 4:2-5, 9, 10) In other respects the altar constructed for the temple apparently was modeled after that of the tabernacle, and no detailed description of it is given.

(2 CHRONICLES 4:2)

“He made the Sea of cast metal. It was circular in shape, 10 cubits from brim to brim and 5 cubits high, and it took a measuring line 30 cubits long to encircle it.”

*** it-1 p. 261 Basin ***
Another basin of great size was the large ornamented molten sea that stood upon 12 fashioned bulls and was “placed at the right side, to the east, toward the south” of the house. Stored therein was water the priests used. It was circular, 10 cubits (4.5 m; 14.6 ft) from brim to brim and 5 cubits (2.2 m; 7.3 ft) high.—2Ch 4:2-6, 10.

(2 CHRONICLES 4:3)

“And there were ornamental gourds under it, completely encircling it, ten to a cubit all around the Sea. The gourds were in two rows and were cast in one piece with it.”

*** it-1 p. 991 Gourd ***
The gourd-shaped ornaments (Heb., peqa•ʽimʹ) adorning the molten sea and the cedarwood paneling inside Solomon’s temple may have been round like the fruit of the colocynth.—1Ki 6:18; 7:24; 2Ch 4:3.

(2 CHRONICLES 4:4)

“It stood on 12 bulls, 3 facing north, 3 facing west, 3 facing south, and 3 facing east; and the Sea rested on them, and all their hindquarters were toward the center.”

*** w05 12/1 p. 19 par. 3 Highlights From the Book of Second Chronicles ***
4:2-4—Why was the representation of bulls used in the construction of the base of the molten sea? In the Scriptures, bulls are a symbol of strength. (Ezekiel 1:10; Revelation 4:6, 7) The choice of bulls as a representation was fitting because the 12 copper bulls supported the huge “sea,” which weighed some 30 tons. The making of bulls for this purpose did not in any way violate the second commandment, which prohibited the making of objects for worship.—Exodus 20:4, 5.

(2 CHRONICLES 4:5)

“And its thickness was a handbreadth; and its brim was made like the brim of a cup, like a lily blossom. The reservoir could hold 3,000 bath measures.”

*** w08 2/1 p. 15 Did You Know? ***
What was the size of the molten sea at Solomon’s temple?
The account at 1 Kings 7:26 refers to the sea as containing “two thousand bath measures” of water used by the priests, whereas the parallel account at 2 Chronicles 4:5 speaks of it as containing “three thousand bath measures.” This has led to the claim that the difference is the result of a scribal error in the Chronicles account.
However, the New World Translation helps us understand how these two texts can be harmonized. First Kings 7:26 reads: “Two thousand bath measures were what it would contain.” Notice that 2 Chronicles 4:5 says: “As a receptacle, three thousand bath measures were what it could contain.” So 2 Chronicles 4:5 refers to the maximum capacity of the temple basin, what it could contain, whereas 1 Kings 7:26 states the quantity of water that was usually put into the temple basin. In other words, it was never filled to maximum capacity. It appears that it was customarily filled to only two thirds of its capacity.

*** w05 12/1 p. 19 par. 4 Highlights From the Book of Second Chronicles ***
4:5—What was the total capacity of the molten sea? When filled, the sea could hold three thousand bath measures, or about 17,400 gallons [66,000 L]. The normal level, however, was probably about two thirds of its capacity. First Kings 7:26 states: “Two thousand bath measures [11,600 gallons [44,000 L]] were what [the sea] would contain.”

*** it-2 pp. 425-426 Molten Sea (Copper Sea) ***
The brim of the sea resembled a lily blossom. The thickness of this large vessel was “a handbreadth [7.4 cm; 2.9 in.].” (1Ki 7:24-26) This huge quantity of copper came from the supplies King David had obtained in his conquests in Syria. (1Ch 18:6-8) The casting was done in a clay mold in the region of the Jordan and was indeed a remarkable feat.—1Ki 7:44-46.
Capacity. The account at 1 Kings 7:26 refers to the sea as ‘containing two thousand bath measures,’ whereas the parallel account at 2 Chronicles 4:5 speaks of it as ‘containing three thousand bath measures.’ Some claim that the difference is the result of a scribal error in the Chronicles account. However, while the Hebrew verb meaning “contain” in each case is the same, there is a measure of latitude allowable in translating it. Thus some translations render 1 Kings 7:26 to read that the vessel “held” or “would contain” 2,000 bath measures, and translate 2 Chronicles 4:5 to read that it “had a capacity of” or “could hold” or “could contain” 3,000 bath measures. (AT, JB, NW) This allows for the understanding that the Kings account sets forth the amount of water customarily stored in the receptacle while the Chronicles account gives the actual capacity of the vessel if filled to the brim.
There is evidence that the bath measure anciently equaled about 22 L (5.8 gal), so that, if kept at two thirds capacity, the sea would normally hold about 44,000 L (11,620 gal) of water. For it to have had the capacity indicated, it must not have had straight sides, but instead, the sides below the rim, or lip, must have been curved, giving the vessel a bulbous shape. A vessel having such a shape and having the dimensions stated earlier could contain up to 66,000 L (17,430 gal). Josephus, Jewish historian of the first century C.E., describes the sea as “in the shape of a hemisphere.” He also indicates that the sea’s location was between the altar of burnt offering and the temple building, somewhat toward the south.—Jewish Antiquities, VIII, 79 (iii, 5); VIII, 86 (iii, 6).

(2 CHRONICLES 4:6)

“Further, he made ten basins for washing and put five to the right and five to the left. They would rinse in them the things used for the burnt offering. But the Sea was for the priests for washing.”

*** it-1 p. 261 Basin ***
The Hebrew word ki•yohrʹ (or ki•yorʹ), meaning “basin” or “laver,” is used for the tabernacle basin. (Ex 35:16, ftn) It is also used to refer to the ten basins Solomon had made for temple use, in which things having to do with the burnt offering were rinsed.—2Ch 4:6, 14.

(2 CHRONICLES 4:16)

“and the cans, the shovels, the forks, and all their utensils Hiʹram-aʹbiv made of polished copper for King Solʹo•mon for the house of Jehovah.”

*** it-1 p. 1122 Hiram ***
Similarly, the expression Hiram-abiv (literally, “Hiram His Father”) seems to mean ‘Hiram is his (that is, the king’s) master workman.’—2Ch 4:16.

*** it-1 p. 1122 Hiram-abiv ***
HIRAM-ABIV
(Hiʹram-aʹbiv) [Hiram His Father].
A term used in reference to the skilled craftsman sent from Tyre to supervise construction of the furnishings of Solomon’s temple. It seems to indicate that Hiram was “father,” not in a literal sense, but in that he was a master workman.—2Ch 4:16; see HIRAM No. 2.

(2 CHRONICLES 5:2)

“At that time Solʹo•mon congregated the elders of Israel, all the heads of the tribes, the chieftains of the paternal houses of Israel. They came to Jerusalem to bring up the ark of the covenant of Jehovah from the City of David, that is, Zion.”

*** it-2 p. 549 Older Man ***
References to “all Israel, its older men and its heads and its judges and its officers” (Jos 23:2; 24:1), “the older men of Israel and all the heads of the tribes, the chieftains of the paternal houses” (2Ch 5:2), do not mean that the “heads,” “judges,” “officers,” and “chieftains” were distinct from the “older men” but, rather, indicate that those named in such a specific way held singular offices within the body of older men.—Compare 2Ki 19:2; Mr 15:1.

(2 CHRONICLES 5:10)

“There was nothing in the Ark but the two tablets that Moses placed in it at Hoʹreb, when Jehovah made a covenant with the people of Israel while they were coming out of Egypt.”

*** w06 1/15 p. 31 Questions From Readers ***
Questions From Readers
Did the ark of the covenant contain only the two stone tablets, or did it also hold other items?
At the time of the dedication of Solomon’s temple in 1026 B.C.E., “there was nothing in the Ark but the two tablets that Moses had given at Horeb, when Jehovah covenanted with the sons of Israel while they were coming out from Egypt.” (2 Chronicles 5:10) However, this was not always the case.
“In the third month after the sons of Israel came out of the land of Egypt,” they entered the wilderness of Sinai. (Exodus 19:1, 2) Thereafter, Moses went up into Mount Sinai and received the two stone tablets of the Law. He relates: “Then I turned and went down from the mountain and placed the tablets in the ark that I had made, that they might continue there, just as Jehovah had commanded me.” (Deuteronomy 10:5) This was a temporary ark, or container, that Jehovah had told Moses to construct to hold the tablets of the Law. (Deuteronomy 10:1) The ark of the covenant was not made ready until about the end of 1513 B.C.E.
Shortly after their deliverance from Egypt, the Israelites began to murmur about food. So Jehovah provided manna for them. (Exodus 12:17, 18; 16:1-5) At that time, Moses instructed Aaron: “Take a jar and put in it an omerful of manna and deposit it before Jehovah as something to be kept throughout your generations.” The account states: “Just as Jehovah had commanded Moses, Aaron proceeded to deposit it before the Testimony [an archive for the safekeeping of important documents] as something to be kept.” (Exodus 16:33, 34) While Aaron undoubtedly gathered manna into a jar at that time, the depositing of it before the Testimony had to wait until Moses made the Ark and placed the tablets in it.
As already noted, the ark of the covenant was constructed late in 1513 B.C.E. Aaron’s rod was placed in that Ark much later, after the rebellion of Korah and others. The apostle Paul mentions “the ark of the covenant . . . , in which were the golden jar having the manna and the rod of Aaron that budded and the tablets of the covenant.”—Hebrews 9:4.
The manna was a provision made by God during the 40-year sojourn of the Israelites in the wilderness. It was no longer provided when “they began to eat some of the yield of the land” of promise. (Joshua 5:11, 12) Aaron’s rod was placed in the ark of the covenant for a purpose—to serve as a sign to or a witness against the rebellious generation. This suggests that the rod remained there at least for the duration of the wilderness journey. It would, then, seem logical to conclude that some time after Israel entered the Promised Land and before the dedication of Solomon’s temple, Aaron’s rod and the golden jar of manna were removed from the ark of the covenant.

*** it-1 p. 166 Ark of the Covenant ***
The Ark served as a holy archive for the safekeeping of sacred reminders or testimony, the principal contents being the two tablets of the testimony, or the Ten Commandments. (Ex 25:16) A “golden jar having the manna and the rod of Aaron that budded” were added to the Ark but were later removed sometime before the building of Solomon’s temple. (Heb 9:4; Ex 16:32-34; Nu 17:10; 1Ki 8:9; 2Ch 5:10)

(2 CHRONICLES 5:13)

“At the moment when the trumpeters and the singers were praising and thanking Jehovah in unison, and as the sound ascended from the trumpets, the cymbals, and the other musical instruments as they were praising Jehovah, “for he is good; his loyal love endures forever,” then the house, the house of Jehovah, was filled with a cloud.”

*** w94 5/1 p. 10 par. 7 Sing Praises to Jehovah ***
There was also a singing of praise to Jehovah accompanied by instrumental music at the time King Solomon dedicated the temple at Jerusalem. We read at 2 Chronicles 5:13, 14: “It came about that as soon as the trumpeters and the singers were as one in causing one sound to be heard in praising and thanking Jehovah, and as soon as they lifted up the sound with the trumpets and with the cymbals and with the instruments of song and with praising Jehovah, ‘for he is good, for to time indefinite is his loving-kindness,’ the house itself was filled with a cloud, the very house of Jehovah, and the priests were not able to stand to minister because of the cloud; for the glory of Jehovah filled the house of the true God.” What does that show? That Jehovah was listening to this melodious praise and was also pleased with it, as was indicated by the supernatural cloud.

(2 CHRONICLES 5:14)

“The priests were not able to stand to minister because of the cloud, for the glory of Jehovah filled the house of the true God.”

*** w94 5/1 p. 10 par. 7 Sing Praises to Jehovah ***
There was also a singing of praise to Jehovah accompanied by instrumental music at the time King Solomon dedicated the temple at Jerusalem. We read at 2 Chronicles 5:13, 14: “It came about that as soon as the trumpeters and the singers were as one in causing one sound to be heard in praising and thanking Jehovah, and as soon as they lifted up the sound with the trumpets and with the cymbals and with the instruments of song and with praising Jehovah, ‘for he is good, for to time indefinite is his loving-kindness,’ the house itself was filled with a cloud, the very house of Jehovah, and the priests were not able to stand to minister because of the cloud; for the glory of Jehovah filled the house of the true God.” What does that show? That Jehovah was listening to this melodious praise and was also pleased with it, as was indicated by the supernatural cloud.

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