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2 Chronicles 20-21-22-23-24, Bible Highlights: week starting december 21

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Highlights From Bible Reading: 2 Chronicles 20-24. Information for personal study.

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Dec. 21 Bible reading: 2 Chronicles 20-24


(2 CHRONICLES 20:1)

“Afterward the Moʹab•ites and the Amʹmon•ites, together with some of the Amʹmon•im, came to wage war against Je•hoshʹa•phat.”

*** it-1 p. 92 Ammonim ***
AMMONIM
(Amʹmon•im) [The Peoples].
At 2 Chronicles 20:1 the Masoretic text refers to some of the “Ammonim [Heb., ʽAm•moh•nimʹ]” as being joined with the sons of Moab and of Ammon in war against Jehoshaphat king of Judah. The King James Version inserts the word “other” to make the text read, “the children of Moab, and the children of Ammon, and with them other beside the Ammonites”; while some other translations render the phrase in question as reading “some of the Ammonites” (MR, JP, Dy), though this seems illogical since the Ammonites are already mentioned in the verse. Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (ftn) and most modern translations (Ro, Mo, AT, RS, JB) regard the text as referring to the Meunim of 2 Chronicles 26:7. This view supposes that a scribal error resulted in the first two consonants (מע) of the Hebrew Meʽu•nimʹ being transposed, thus giving ʽAm•moh•nimʹ. This identification with the Meunim may find support in the fact that the remainder of the account of the fight against Jehoshaphat refers to “the mountainous region of Seir” (in place of “the Ammonim”) as joined with the Ammonite-Moabite forces. (2Ch 20:10, 22, 23) The translators of the Septuagint used the same Greek word (Mi•naiʹon) to render the Hebrew term at 2 Chronicles 20:1 as they did in the texts referring to the Meunim, showing that they understood them to be the same.—See MEUNIM.
Since the matter is not certain, however, some translations, such as that of Isaac Leeser and the New World Translation, prefer simply to transliterate the term into English, thereby retaining the wording found in the Masoretic text.

*** it-1 p. 951 Enemy Nations That Attacked Israel ***
Ammon 2Ch 20:1-3, 10, 11; 2Ki 24:2

*** it-2 p. 421 Moab ***
So it seems likely that it was at an earlier date during Jehoshaphat’s reign that Moab combined with the forces of Ammon and the mountainous region of Seir to attack Judah. By Jehovah’s intervention the three armies turned on one another and destroyed themselves. (2Ch 20:1, 22-24) Some scholars believe that this event is alluded to at Psalm 83:4-9.—Compare 2Ch 20:14 with Ps 83:Sup.

(2 CHRONICLES 20:7)

“O our God, did you not drive away the inhabitants of this land from before your people Israel and then give it as a lasting possession to the offspring of your friend Abraham?”

*** it-1 p. 873 Friend ***
Friend of God. Among the divine blessings bestowed upon Abraham was the privilege and honor of being called “Jehovah’s friend [or, lover].” This was by reason of Abraham’s outstanding faith, which he demonstrated to the greatest degree possible in his willingness to offer up his son Isaac as a sacrifice.—Isa 41:8, ftn; 2Ch 20:7; Jas 2:21-23; see DECLARE RIGHTEOUS.

(2 CHRONICLES 20:10)

“Now here are the men of Amʹmon, Moʹab, and the mountainous region of Seʹir, whom you did not allow Israel to invade when they came out of the land of Egypt. They turned away from them and did not annihilate them.”

*** it-1 p. 951 Enemy Nations That Attacked Israel ***
Ammon 2Ch 20:1-3, 10, 11; 2Ki 24:2

(2 CHRONICLES 20:11)

“Now they are repaying us by coming in to drive us out from your possession that you gave us as an inheritance.”

*** it-1 p. 951 Enemy Nations That Attacked Israel ***
Ammon 2Ch 20:1-3, 10, 11; 2Ki 24:2

(2 CHRONICLES 20:17)

“You will not need to fight this battle. Take your position, stand still, and see the salvation of Jehovah in your behalf. O Judah and Jerusalem, do not be afraid or be terrified. Tomorrow go out against them, and Jehovah will be with you.’””

*** w05 12/1 p. 21 par. 2 Highlights From the Book of Second Chronicles ***
20:17. To “see the salvation of Jehovah,” we need to “take [our] position” in active support of God’s Kingdom. Rather than take matters into our own hands, we must “stand still,” placing our implicit trust in Jehovah.

*** w03 6/1 pp. 21-22 Stand Still and See the Salvation of Jehovah! ***
How Will God’s Servants React?
14 What will servants of God be expected to do once they come under attack? Again, the reaction of God’s typical nation in the days of Jehoshaphat sets the pattern. Note that its citizens were commanded to do three things: (1) take their position, (2) stand still, and (3) see the salvation of Jehovah. How will God’s people today act in harmony with these words?—2 Chronicles 20:17.
15 Take their position: Without wavering, God’s people will continue to hold to their position of active support for God’s Kingdom. They will continue to maintain their position of Christian neutrality. They will be “steadfast, unmovable” in their loyal service to Jehovah and will continue publicly to praise Jehovah for his loving-kindness. (1 Corinthians 15:58; Psalm 118:28, 29) No present or future pressure can shake them from this divinely approved position.
16 Stand still: Jehovah’s servants will not try to save themselves but will place their implicit trust in Jehovah. Only he is capable of rescuing his servants out of world chaos, and he has promised to do so. (Isaiah 43:10, 11; 54:15; Lamentations 3:26) Trusting in Jehovah will include trusting the modern visible channel that he has clearly been using for decades to serve his purposes. As never before, true Christians will then need to place their confidence in fellow worshipers authorized by Jehovah and his reigning King to take the lead. These faithful men will direct God’s people. Ignoring their direction could end in disaster.—Matthew 24:45-47; Hebrews 13:7, 17.
17 See the salvation of Jehovah: Salvation will be the reward for all those who hold to their position of Christian integrity and who trust in Jehovah for deliverance. Until the final hour—and to the extent they can—they will announce the arrival of the day of Jehovah’s judgment. All creation must know that Jehovah is the true God and that he has faithful servants on earth. Never again will there be the need for a prolonged controversy over the rightfulness of Jehovah’s sovereignty.—Ezekiel 33:33; 36:23.

(2 CHRONICLES 20:20)

“They rose up early the next morning and went out to the wilderness of Te•koʹa. As they went out, Je•hoshʹa•phat stood up and said: “Listen to me, O Judah and you inhabitants of Jerusalem! Put faith in Jehovah your God so that you may be able to stand firm. Put faith in his prophets, and you will be successful.””

*** w98 5/1 p. 20 par. 4 Judgment Executed in the Low Plain of Decision ***
4 Jehovah required more of King Jehoshaphat and his people than that they merely sit idly by, awaiting a miraculous deliverance. They were to take the initiative in coping with the enemy’s challenge. The king and ‘all those of Judah, even their little ones, their wives and their sons,’ expressed strong faith as they obediently rose early in the morning and marched out to meet the invading hordes. On the way, the king continued to provide theocratic instruction and encouragement, urging them: “Put faith in Jehovah your God that you may prove yourselves of long duration. Put faith in his prophets and so prove successful.” (2 Chronicles 20:20) Faith in Jehovah! Faith in his prophets! Therein lay the key to success. Likewise today, as we continue active in Jehovah’s service, may we never doubt that he will make our faith victorious!

(2 CHRONICLES 20:21)

“After he consulted with the people, he appointed men to sing to Jehovah and to offer praise in holy adornment as they went out ahead of the armed men, saying: “Give thanks to Jehovah, for his loyal love endures forever.””

*** w98 5/1 p. 20 par. 5 Judgment Executed in the Low Plain of Decision ***
5 Like the Judeans of Jehoshaphat’s day, we must “give praise to Jehovah, for to time indefinite is his loving-kindness.” How do we render this praise? By our zealous Kingdom preaching! As those Judeans “started off with the joyful cry and praise,” so we add to our faith works. (2 Chronicles 20:21, 22) Yes, let us exhibit similar sterling faith as Jehovah prepares to move into action against his enemies! Though the road may appear to be long, let us be determined to endure, active in faith, even as his victorious people are doing in trouble spots of the earth today.

(2 CHRONICLES 20:22)

“When they began joyfully singing praises, Jehovah set an ambush against the men of Amʹmon, Moʹab, and the mountainous region of Seʹir who were invading Judah, and they struck each other down.”

*** w98 5/1 p. 20 par. 5 Judgment Executed in the Low Plain of Decision ***
5 Like the Judeans of Jehoshaphat’s day, we must “give praise to Jehovah, for to time indefinite is his loving-kindness.” How do we render this praise? By our zealous Kingdom preaching! As those Judeans “started off with the joyful cry and praise,” so we add to our faith works. (2 Chronicles 20:21, 22) Yes, let us exhibit similar sterling faith as Jehovah prepares to move into action against his enemies! Though the road may appear to be long, let us be determined to endure, active in faith, even as his victorious people are doing in trouble spots of the earth today.

(2 CHRONICLES 20:26)

“On the fourth day they congregated together at the Valley of Berʹa•cah, for there they praised Jehovah. That is why they named that place Valley of Berʹa•cah—until today.”

*** it-1 p. 290 Beracah ***
2. A low plain in Judah lying between Bethlehem and Hebron. It is presently identified with the Wadi el-ʽArrub, and nearby Khirbet Bereikut (Berakhot) seems to preserve evidence of the original name. This valley runs E-W, connecting the hill country of Judah with the wilderness area W of the Salt Sea.
Following the miraculous victory over the combined forces of Ammon, Moab, and Edom, Jehoshaphat congregated the people at this low plain to bless Jehovah, hence the name of the Low Plain of Beracah (meaning “Blessing”).—2Ch 20:26.

(2 CHRONICLES 20:34)

“As for the rest of the history of Je•hoshʹa•phat, from beginning to end, there it is written among the words of Jeʹhu the son of Ha•naʹni, which were included in the Book of the Kings of Israel.”

*** w09 3/15 p. 32 Questions From Readers ***
On the other hand, certain references may be to books that have names similar to books of the Bible but that are not actually part of the Bible. We might illustrate this with four ancient books: “the book of the affairs of the times of the kings of Judah,” “the Book of the Kings of Judah and of Israel,” “the Book of the Kings of Israel,” and “the Book of the Kings of Israel and of Judah.” While those names may sound similar to the names of the Bible books we know as 1 Kings and 2 Kings, the four books were not inspired, nor do those books find a place in the Bible canon. (1 Ki. 14:29; 2 Chron. 16:11; 20:34; 27:7) They were likely just historical writings available back in the period when the prophet Jeremiah and Ezra wrote the accounts that we have in the Bible.

(2 CHRONICLES 20:36)

“So he made him his partner in making ships to go to Tarʹshish, and they built the ships in Eʹzi•on-geʹber.”

*** it-1 p. 796 Ezion-geber ***
It may be noted that both in Solomon’s case and in that of Jehoshaphat some of the ships were intended to go not only to Ophir but also to Tarshish. (2Ch 9:21; 20:36, 37) Since the evidence is strong that Tarshish was in Spain, some have doubted that ships sailing from Ezion-geber could have made such a trip in ancient times. As to this, see the article TARSHISH No. 4, where the possibility of the existence of a Nile–Red Sea canal is presented. Such a canal might also explain how King Hiram could send not only men but “ships” to Ezion-geber and Eloth (Elath) for Solomon’s use. (2Ch 8:17, 18) On the other hand, it has also been suggested that these ships may have been sent to a point on the Philistine coast, dismantled, and transported overland to the Gulf of ʽAqaba, where they were reconstructed. Those holding this view point out that the Crusaders later used a similar method. Whether by some Nile–Red Sea canal or by an overland route, it seems likely that at least timber was supplied from forest lands elsewhere, since the region around Ezion-geber has palm groves but no trees suitable for ship construction.

*** it-2 pp. 1066-1067 Tarshish ***
It is generally believed that the term “ships of Tarshish” in course of time came to stand for a type of ship, as one lexicon puts it: “large, sea-going vessels, fit to ply to Tarshish.” (A Hebrew and English Lexicon of the Old Testament, by Brown, Driver, and Briggs, 1980, p. 1077) In a similar way, the name Indiamen originally was derived from the name applied to large British ships engaged in trade with India and in time came to apply to ships of that type no matter what their origin or destination. Thus 1 Kings 22:48 shows that King Jehoshaphat (936-911 B.C.E.) “made Tarshish ships to go to Ophir for gold.”
The Chronicles account, however, states that Solomon’s ships used for the triannual voyages “were going to Tarshish” (2Ch 9:21); also that Jehoshaphat’s ships were designed “to go to Tarshish” and, when wrecked, “did not retain strength to go to Tarshish.” (2Ch 20:36, 37) This would indicate that Ophir was not the only port of call of the Israelite “ships of Tarshish,” but that they also navigated Mediterranean waters. This, of course, poses a problem, since the launching site of at least some of these vessels is shown to have been Ezion-geber on the Gulf of ʽAqaba. (1Ki 9:26) For the ships to reach the Mediterranean Sea, they would either have to traverse a canal from the Red Sea to the Nile River and then into the Mediterranean or else circumnavigate the continent of Africa. While it is by no means possible to determine now the details of navigational routes (including canals) available or employed in Solomon’s and in Jehoshaphat’s time, there is likewise no need to view the record of their maritime projects as unfeasible.

(2 CHRONICLES 21:2)

“His brothers, Je•hoshʹa•phat’s sons, were Az•a•riʹah, Je•hiʹel, Zech•a•riʹah, Az•a•riʹah, Miʹcha•el, and Sheph•a•tiʹah; all of these were the sons of King Je•hoshʹa•phat of Israel.”

*** it-1 p. 224 Azariah ***
7, 8. Two of Jehoshaphat’s seven sons, listed second and fifth. They were given many gifts and fortified cities by their father, but when their elder brother, Jehoram, became king, these sons were killed. (2Ch 21:1-4) “It seems far-fetched to suppose [as some have] that the name was used twice because the boys were only half brothers or because one had already died in infancy.” (The Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, edited by G. A. Buttrick, 1962, Vol. 1, p. 325) It is unusual for two brothers to have apparently the same name, but in Hebrew there is a slight difference between the two in spelling and pronunciation, ʽAzar•yahʹ (“Jah Has Helped”) and ʽAzar•yaʹhu (“Jehovah Has Helped”).

(2 CHRONICLES 21:12)

“Eventually a written message came to him from E•liʹjah the prophet, saying: “This is what Jehovah the God of David your forefather says, ‘You have not walked in the ways of your father Je•hoshʹa•phat or in the ways of King Aʹsa of Judah.”

*** it-1 p. 712 Elijah ***
A number of years after his ascension in the windstorm Elijah is still alive and active as a prophet, this time to the king of Judah. Because of the wicked course taken by King Jehoram of Judah, Elijah writes him a letter expressing Jehovah’s condemnation, which is fulfilled shortly thereafter.—2Ch 21:12-15; see HEAVEN (Ascension to Heaven).

(2 CHRONICLES 21:16)

“Then Jehovah stirred up against Je•hoʹram the Phi•lisʹtines and the Arabs who were near the E•thi•oʹpi•ans.”

*** it-1 pp. 140-141 Arabia ***
Since the SW corner of Arabia is separated from Africa by a narrow strait of water only about 32 km (20 mi) across, products from Ethiopia (2Ch 21:16), such as ivory and ebony, could also have been included in the wares of these traveling merchants.—Eze 27:15.

*** it-1 p. 561 Cushite ***
The expression at 2 Chronicles 21:16 “by the side of the Ethiopians [Cushites]” as applying to certain Arabs may also mean “under the control of the Ethiopians,” and this might indicate one basis for applying the name “Cushite” to persons not descended from Cush. Several of Cush’s sons are believed to have settled on the Arabian Peninsula.—See HAVILAH No. 3; SABTAH.

(2 CHRONICLES 21:17)

“So they invaded Judah, forcing their way in, and carried off all the possessions that were found in the king’s house, as well as his sons and his wives; and the only son left to him was Je•hoʹa•haz, his youngest son.”

*** it-1 p. 63 Ahaziah ***
Ahaziah is also referred to as “Azariah” at 2 Chronicles 22:6 (though here 15 Hebrew manuscripts read “Ahaziah”), and as “Jehoahaz” at 2 Chronicles 21:17; 25:23 (a case of transposing the divine name to serve as a prefix instead of as a suffix).

(2 CHRONICLES 21:20)

“He was 32 years old when he became king, and he reigned for eight years in Jerusalem. No one regretted it when he died. So they buried him in the City of David, but not in the burial places of the kings.”

*** w98 11/15 p. 32 What Kind of Name Do You Have? ***
In contrast, Judean King Jehoram made a bad name for himself. He turned his subjects away from the worship of Jehovah and even had his six brothers and some of the princes of Judah put to death. Eventually, Jehovah afflicted Jehoram with a painful illness that led to his death. The Bible says that Jehoram “went away without being desired,” or as Today’s English Version puts it, “nobody was sorry when he died.”—2 Chronicles 21:20.

(2 CHRONICLES 22:6)

“He returned to Jezʹre•el to recover from the wounds that they had inflicted on him at Raʹmah when he fought against King Hazʹa•el of Syria. A•ha•ziʹah the son of Je•hoʹram the king of Judah went down to Jezʹre•el to see Je•hoʹram the son of Aʹhab, because he had been wounded.”

*** it-1 p. 63 Ahaziah ***
Ahaziah is also referred to as “Azariah” at 2 Chronicles 22:6 (though here 15 Hebrew manuscripts read “Ahaziah”), and as “Jehoahaz” at 2 Chronicles 21:17; 25:23 (a case of transposing the divine name to serve as a prefix instead of as a suffix).

(2 CHRONICLES 22:7)

“But God brought about the downfall of A•ha•ziʹah by his coming to Je•hoʹram; and when he came, he went out with Je•hoʹram to meet Jeʹhu the grandson of Nimʹshi, whom Jehovah had anointed to do away with the house of Aʹhab.”

*** it-1 p. 63 Ahaziah ***
Coordinating the two accounts (2Ki 9:21-28; 2Ch 22:7-9), the following evidently took place: Jehu, on nearing Jezreel, met Jehoram and Ahaziah. Jehu struck down Jehoram, but Ahaziah fled. At this time Jehu did not pursue Ahaziah but continued to Jezreel to finish his executional work there. Meanwhile the fleeing Ahaziah tried to make his way back to Jerusalem; however, he only got as far as Samaria, where he tried to hide himself. Jehu’s men, pursuing Ahaziah, discovered him in Samaria and captured him, and he was brought to Jehu, who was near the town of Ibleam, not far from Jezreel. When Jehu saw Ahaziah, he ordered his men to kill him in his chariot. They struck and wounded him on the way up to Gur, near Ibleam; but Ahaziah was allowed to escape, and he fled to Megiddo, where he died of his wounds. He was then taken to Jerusalem and buried there. The accounts of his death are not contradictory but complementary.
Second Chronicles 22:7 points out that Ahaziah’s death “was from God,” and thus Jehu acted as God’s executioner in slaying this man who fellowshipped with the condemned house of Ahab.

(2 CHRONICLES 22:9)

“Then he looked for A•ha•ziʹah; they captured him where he was hiding in Sa•marʹi•a, and they brought him to Jeʹhu. Then they put him to death and buried him, for they said: “He is the grandson of Je•hoshʹa•phat, who searched for Jehovah with all his heart.” There was no one of the house of A•ha•ziʹah who had the power to rule the kingdom.”

*** it-1 p. 63 Ahaziah ***
Coordinating the two accounts (2Ki 9:21-28; 2Ch 22:7-9), the following evidently took place: Jehu, on nearing Jezreel, met Jehoram and Ahaziah. Jehu struck down Jehoram, but Ahaziah fled. At this time Jehu did not pursue Ahaziah but continued to Jezreel to finish his executional work there. Meanwhile the fleeing Ahaziah tried to make his way back to Jerusalem; however, he only got as far as Samaria, where he tried to hide himself. Jehu’s men, pursuing Ahaziah, discovered him in Samaria and captured him, and he was brought to Jehu, who was near the town of Ibleam, not far from Jezreel. When Jehu saw Ahaziah, he ordered his men to kill him in his chariot. They struck and wounded him on the way up to Gur, near Ibleam; but Ahaziah was allowed to escape, and he fled to Megiddo, where he died of his wounds. He was then taken to Jerusalem and buried there. The accounts of his death are not contradictory but complementary.
Second Chronicles 22:7 points out that Ahaziah’s death “was from God,” and thus Jehu acted as God’s executioner in slaying this man who fellowshipped with the condemned house of Ahab.

(2 CHRONICLES 22:11)

“However, Je•ho•shabʹe•ath the daughter of the king took Je•hoʹash the son of A•ha•ziʹah and stole him away from among the sons of the king who were to be put to death, and she put him and his nurse in an inner bedroom. Je•ho•shabʹe•ath the daughter of King Je•hoʹram (she was the wife of Je•hoiʹa•da the priest and a sister of A•ha•ziʹah) managed to keep him concealed from Ath•a•liʹah, so that she did not put him to death.”

*** it-2 p. 1093 Thief ***
The aunt of young Jehoash saved his life by ‘stealing him away from among his brothers,’ who were killed by wicked Athaliah.—2Ki 11:1, 2; 2Ch 22:11.

(2 CHRONICLES 23:5)

“another third will be at the house of the king, and the other third will be at the Gate of the Foundation, and all the people will be in the courtyards of the house of Jehovah.”

*** it-1 p. 897 Gate, Gateway ***
Gate of the Foundation. A temple gate, the location of which is uncertain.—2Ki 11:6; 2Ch 23:5.

(2 CHRONICLES 23:13)

“Then she saw the king standing there by his pillar at the entrance. The princes and the trumpeters were with the king, and all the people of the land were rejoicing and blowing the trumpets, and the singers with musical instruments were leading the praises. At this Ath•a•liʹah ripped her garments apart and cried out: “Conspiracy! Conspiracy!””

*** it-2 p. 643 Pillar ***
The most noteworthy pillars in Solomon’s temple were two huge copper pillars named Jachin and Boaz in front of the porch. (1Ki 7:15; 2Ki 25:17; Jer 52:21; see CAPITAL.) The New Bible Dictionary edited by J. Douglas (1985, p. 941) suggests that the king stood by one of these pillars on ceremonial occasions, but that cannot be confirmed, for the Bible merely says the king was “standing by his pillar at the entry.” (2Ch 23:13; 2Ki 11:14; 23:3) He could have been standing at a gate of the inner court or some other elevated place for addressing the people.

(2 CHRONICLES 23:15)

“So they seized her, and when she reached the entrance of the Horse Gate of the king’s house, they immediately put her to death there.”

*** it-1 p. 896 Gate, Gateway ***
Some have held that the Horse Gate was one providing communication between two parts of the temple-palace quarter. They reach this conclusion from the account of Athaliah’s execution, which reports that, on being led out of the temple by the soldiers, “she came to the entry of the horse gate of the king’s house.” (2Ch 23:15; 2Ki 11:16) However, this was likely an entry just to the precincts of the royal palace and not the Horse Gate through which the horses passed in and out of the city itself.

(2 CHRONICLES 24:6)

“So the king called Je•hoiʹa•da the chief and said to him: “Why have you not required the Levites to bring in from Judah and Jerusalem the sacred tax ordered by Moses the servant of Jehovah, the sacred tax of the congregation of Israel, for the tent of the Testimony?”

*** it-1 p. 502 Contribution ***
Some contributions were required under the Law. When Moses took a census of the Israelites, each male 20 years old and upward was to give a ransom for his soul, “a half shekel [probably $1.10] by the shekel of the holy place.” It was “Jehovah’s contribution” in order to make atonement for their souls and “in behalf of the service of the tent of meeting.” (Ex 30:11-16) According to the Jewish historian Josephus (The Jewish War, VII, 218 [vi, 6]), this “sacred tax” was thereafter paid annually.—2Ch 24:6-10; Mt 17:24; see TAXATION.

*** it-2 p. 1069 Taxation ***
Taxes for Maintaining Jehovah’s Sanctuary. The service of the sanctuary was maintained through taxation. Obligatory tithing provided the major source of maintenance for the Aaronic priests and Levites, and on at least one occasion, they received a share of the war booty in accordance with a tax stipulated by Jehovah. (Nu 18:26-29; 31:26-47; see TITHE.) Jehovah also instructed Moses that after he took a census, each person registered was to give a half shekel ($1.10) as “Jehovah’s contribution,” it serving in behalf of the tent of meeting. (Ex 30:12-16) It appears that it became customary for the Jews to give a fixed amount every year, even though a census was not taken annually. Jehoash, for example, called for “the sacred tax ordered by Moses.” (2Ch 24:6, 9) The Jews of Nehemiah’s time obligated themselves to pay a third of a shekel (c. 75 cents) yearly for the service of the temple.—Ne 10:32.

(2 CHRONICLES 24:8)

“Then, at the king’s order, a chest was made and placed outside at the gate of the house of Jehovah.”

*** it-1 p. 242 Bag ***
however, most modern translations render the Greek word glos•soʹko•mon as “box” or “money box.” Originally used to refer to a case for keeping the mouthpiece of a wind instrument, the Greek word came to stand for a small box used for any purpose, including the keeping of money. The translators of the Greek Septuagint used this word to refer to the chest mentioned at 2 Chronicles 24:8, 10.

(2 CHRONICLES 24:10)

“All the princes and all the people rejoiced, and they kept bringing contributions and dropping them into the chest until it was full.”

*** it-1 p. 242 Bag ***
however, most modern translations render the Greek word glos•soʹko•mon as “box” or “money box.” Originally used to refer to a case for keeping the mouthpiece of a wind instrument, the Greek word came to stand for a small box used for any purpose, including the keeping of money. The translators of the Greek Septuagint used this word to refer to the chest mentioned at 2 Chronicles 24:8, 10.

(2 CHRONICLES 24:20)

“God’s spirit came upon Zech•a•riʹah the son of Je•hoiʹa•da the priest, and he stood above the people and said to them: “This is what the true God says, ‘Why are you violating the commandments of Jehovah? You will not be successful! Because you have abandoned Jehovah, he will, in turn, abandon you.’””

*** gt chap. 110 Ministry at the Temple Completed ***
Zechariah son of Barachiah [called Jehoiada in Second Chronicles], whom you murdered between the sanctuary and the altar. Truly I say to you, All these things will come upon this generation.”
Because Zechariah chastised Israel’s leaders, “they conspired against him and pelted him with stones at the king’s commandment in the courtyard of Jehovah’s house.”

*** w90 3/1 p. 24 Ministry at the Temple Completed ***
Zechariah son of Barachiah [called Jehoiada in 2 Chronicles], whom you murdered between the sanctuary and the altar. Truly I say to you, All these things will come upon this generation.”
Because Zechariah courageously chastised Israel’s leaders, “they conspired against him and pelted him with stones at the king’s commandment in the courtyard of Jehovah’s house.”

(2 CHRONICLES 24:21)

“But they conspired against him and stoned him at the king’s order in the courtyard of Jehovah’s house.”

*** it-1 p. 254 Barachiah ***
According to 2 Chronicles 24:21, Zechariah was murdered “in the courtyard of Jehovah’s house.” The altar of burnt offering was in the inner courtyard, outside of and in front of the entrance to the sanctuary. This would correspond with Jesus’ location of the incident “between the sanctuary and the altar.”

(2 CHRONICLES 24:22)

“Thus King Je•hoʹash did not remember the loyal love that his father Je•hoiʹa•da had shown toward him, and he killed his son, who said as he was dying: “May Jehovah see to it and call you to account.””

*** it-1 pp. 254-255 Barachiah ***
Concerning both Abel and Zechariah a reckoning for the shedding of their blood was foretold. (Ge 4:10; 2Ch 24:22) Also, there is a strong parallel between the circumstances and events in the days of Zechariah the son of Jehoiada and those of the generation living when Jesus spoke these words. As Zechariah was dying he said: “Let Jehovah see to it and ask it back.” Very soon his prophetic words began to be fulfilled. A small Syrian force came up, and Jehovah delivered a great military force of Judah into their hand, the princes of Judah being greatly ruined and despoiled. The Syrians executed acts of judgment on Jehoash and left him with many diseases, after which he was murdered by his servants. (2Ch 24:23-25) After describing the bloodguilt of those to whom he was talking, Jesus said: “All these things will come upon this generation.” (Mt 23:36) Jesus’ prophecy was fulfilled on Jerusalem and Judea in 70-73 C.E.

*** it-2 p. 1223 Zechariah ***
12. Son of High Priest Jehoiada. After Jehoiada’s death, King Jehoash turned away from true worship, listening to wrong counsel rather than to Jehovah’s prophets. Zechariah, Jehoash’s cousin (2Ch 22:11), sternly warned the people about this, but instead of repenting, they stoned him in the temple courtyard. Zechariah’s dying words were: “Let Jehovah see to it and ask it back.” This prophetic request was granted, for not only did Syria do great damage to Judah but also Jehoash was killed by two of his servants “because of the blood of the sons of Jehoiada the priest.” The Greek Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate say that Jehoash was killed to avenge the blood of the “son” of Jehoiada. The Masoretic text and the Syriac Peshitta, however, read “sons,” possibly using the plural number to denote the excellence and worth of Jehoiada’s son Zechariah the prophet-priest.—2Ch 24:17-22, 25.
Zechariah the son of Jehoiada is most likely the one whom Jesus had in mind when prophesying that “the blood of all the prophets spilled from the founding of the world” will be required “from this generation [the Jews of the time of Jesus’ earthly ministry], from the blood of Abel down to the blood of Zechariah, who was slain between the altar and the house.” (Lu 11:50, 51) The places mentioned as the site of the slaying correspond. In the first century C.E., Chronicles was the last book in the canon of the Hebrew Scriptures. So Jesus’ phrase, “from Abel . . . to Zechariah,” was similar to our expression, “from Genesis to Revelation.” In the parallel account at Matthew 23:35, Zechariah is called the son of Barachiah, possibly another name for Jehoiada, unless, by chance, it indicates a generation between Jehoiada and Zechariah or is the name of an earlier ancestor.—See BARACHIAH.

(2 CHRONICLES 24:25)

“And when they withdrew from him (for they left him severely wounded), his own servants conspired against him because he had shed the blood of the sons of Je•hoiʹa•da the priest. They killed him on his own bed. So he died and they buried him in the City of David, but they did not bury him in the burial places of the kings.”

*** it-2 p. 1223 Zechariah ***
12. Son of High Priest Jehoiada. After Jehoiada’s death, King Jehoash turned away from true worship, listening to wrong counsel rather than to Jehovah’s prophets. Zechariah, Jehoash’s cousin (2Ch 22:11), sternly warned the people about this, but instead of repenting, they stoned him in the temple courtyard. Zechariah’s dying words were: “Let Jehovah see to it and ask it back.” This prophetic request was granted, for not only did Syria do great damage to Judah but also Jehoash was killed by two of his servants “because of the blood of the sons of Jehoiada the priest.” The Greek Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate say that Jehoash was killed to avenge the blood of the “son” of Jehoiada. The Masoretic text and the Syriac Peshitta, however, read “sons,” possibly using the plural number to denote the excellence and worth of Jehoiada’s son Zechariah the prophet-priest.—2Ch 24:17-22, 25.
Zechariah the son of Jehoiada is most likely the one whom Jesus had in mind when prophesying that “the blood of all the prophets spilled from the founding of the world” will be required “from this generation [the Jews of the time of Jesus’ earthly ministry], from the blood of Abel down to the blood of Zechariah, who was slain between the altar and the house.” (Lu 11:50, 51) The places mentioned as the site of the slaying correspond. In the first century C.E., Chronicles was the last book in the canon of the Hebrew Scriptures. So Jesus’ phrase, “from Abel . . . to Zechariah,” was similar to our expression, “from Genesis to Revelation.” In the parallel account at Matthew 23:35, Zechariah is called the son of Barachiah, possibly another name for Jehoiada, unless, by chance, it indicates a generation between Jehoiada and Zechariah or is the name of an earlier ancestor.—See BARACHIAH.

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