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All References Week Starting may 12


‒Theocratic Ministry School
--Highlights of the Bible
‒Service Meeting
‒Congregation Bible Study
‒ Watchtower Study

Our Meetings All In One (AIO)

Theocratic Ministry School


No. 1: Exodus 29:19-30


No. 2: Jesus Did Not Divide the Mosaic Law Into “Ceremonial” and “Moral” Parts (rs p. 347 ¶3–p. 348 ¶1)

rs p. 347 ¶3–p. 348 ¶1 Sabbath
Matt. 5:17, 21, 23, 27, 31, 38: “Do not think I came to destroy the Law or the Prophets. I came, not to destroy, but to fulfill.” Now, notice what Jesus included in his further comments. “You heard that it was said to those of ancient times, ‘You must not murder [Ex. 20:13; the Sixth Commandment]’ . . . If, then, you are bringing your gift to the altar [Deut. 16:16, 17; no part of the Ten Commandments] . . . You heard that it was said, ‘You must not commit adultery [Ex. 20:14; the Seventh Commandment].’ Moreover it was said, ‘Whoever divorces his wife, let him give her a certificate of divorce [Deut. 24:1; no part of the Ten Commandments].’ You heard that it was said, ‘Eye for eye and tooth for tooth [Ex. 21:23-25; no part of the Ten Commandments].’” (So, Jesus mixed together references to the Ten Commandments and other parts of the Law, making no distinction between them. Should we treat them differently?)
When Jesus was asked, “Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?” did he isolate the Ten Commandments? Instead, he replied: “‘You must love Jehovah your God with your whole heart and with your whole soul and with your whole mind.’ This is the greatest and first commandment. The second, like it, is this, ‘You must love your neighbor as yourself.’ On these two commandments the whole Law hangs, and the Prophets.” (Matt. 22:35-40) If some cling to the Ten Commandments (Deut. 5:6-21), saying that they are binding on Christians but that the rest are not, are they not actually rejecting what Jesus said (quoting Deut. 6:5; Lev. 19:18) as to which commandments are the greatest?

No. 3: Abraham—Obedience, Unselfishness, and Courage Are Qualities That Please Jehovah (it-1 p. 29 ¶4-7)

it-1 p. 29 ¶4-7 Abraham
Sojourn in Canaan. Now 75 years old, Abraham began to move his household out of Haran to the land of Canaan, where he lived out the remaining hundred years of his life in tents as an alien and migratory resident. (Ge 12:4) It was following the death of his father Terah that Abraham went out from Haran in 1943 B.C.E. and crossed the Euphrates River, evidently on the 14th day of the month that later became known as Nisan. (Ge 11:32; Ex 12:40-43, LXX) It was at that time that the covenant between Jehovah and Abraham went into effect, and the 430-year period of temporary residence until the making of the Law covenant with Israel began.—Ex 12:40-42; Ga 3:17.
Evidently Abraham, with his flocks and herds, traveled down through Damascus and on to Shechem (located 48 km [30 mi] N of Jerusalem), near the big trees of Moreh. (Ge 12:6) Here Jehovah appeared again to Abraham, confirming and enlarging His covenant promise by declaring: “To your seed I am going to give this land.” (Ge 12:7) Abraham not only built an altar to Jehovah there but, as he moved southward through the land, he built other altars along the way; and he called on the name of Jehovah. (Ge 12:8, 9) In time a severe famine compelled Abraham to move temporarily to Egypt, and to protect his life, he represented Sarah as his sister. This resulted in Pharaoh’s taking beautiful Sarah into his household to be his wife, but before he could violate her, Jehovah had Pharaoh give her back. Abraham then returned to Canaan to the campsite between Bethel and Ai and again called “on the name of Jehovah.”—Ge 12:10–13:4.
It now became necessary, because of the increasing size of their flocks and herds, for Abraham and Lot to separate. Lot selected the basin of the lower Jordan, a well-watered region “like the garden of Jehovah,” and later established his camp near Sodom. (Ge 13:5-13) Abraham, for his part, after being told to travel about through the length and breadth of the land, came to dwell among the big trees of Mamre in Hebron, 30 km (19 mi) SSW of Jerusalem.—Ge 13:14-18.
When four allied kings, headed by the Elamite king Chedorlaomer, were successful in crushing a revolt of five Canaanite kings, Sodom and Gomorrah were sacked, and Lot was taken captive together with all of his property. Abraham, upon learning of this, quickly mustered 318 of his trained household servants. With his confederates Aner, Eshcol, and Mamre, he made a forced march in hot pursuit perhaps as much as 300 km (190 mi) northward to beyond Damascus and, with Jehovah’s help, defeated a far superior force. Lot was thus rescued, and the stolen property was recovered. (Ge 14:1-16, 23, 24) As Abraham was returning from this great victory a “priest of the Most High God,” Melchizedek, who was also the king of Salem, came out and blessed him, and Abraham, in turn, “gave him a tenth of everything.”—Ge 14:17-20.

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Highlights of the Bible

Highlights From the Book of Exodus 27-29


Exodus 27:20
Why were olive trees particularly appreciated in Bible times?
▪ Olive trees and vineyards were among the blessings that God promised his people for their faithfulness to him. (Deuteronomy 6:10, 11) To this day, the olive tree is highly esteemed in areas in which it grows. It can produce abundant fruit for hundreds of years with relatively little care. A cultivated tree can flourish even in rocky soil and can endure frequent droughts. If the tree is felled, the rootstock produces several shoots that can develop into new trunks.
In Bible times, the bark and leaves of the tree were valued for their fever-reducing properties. The gum resin that seeps from old branches and has a vanilla scent was used to make perfume. Primarily, however, the tree was prized as a source of food—its berries and especially its oil. The pulp of a ripe olive is about half oil.
One good tree could yield as much as 15 gallons (57 L) of oil a year. Olive oil was also used as lamp fuel, for ceremonial and religious purposes, as a cosmetic for the body and hair, and as a medicine to soften wounds and soothe bruises.—Exodus 27:20; Leviticus 2:1-7; 8:1-12; Ruth 3:3; Luke 10:33, 34.

Exodus 28:1
5 Jehovah made other provisions to care for the spiritual needs of his people. Even before they arrived in the Promised Land, he commanded them to build the tabernacle, the center of true worship. He also set up a priesthood to teach the Law, to offer animal sacrifices, and to burn the morning and evening incense. God installed Moses’ older brother, Aaron, as Israel’s first high priest and appointed Aaron’s sons to assist their father with his duties.—Exodus 28:1; Numbers 3:10; 2 Chronicles 13:10, 11.

Exodus 28:36
6 Our heart will not naturally veer toward chastity. We must steer it that way. One way to do so is to contemplate the true value of chastity. This quality is closely related to holiness, which signifies cleanness, purity, separation from sinfulness. Holiness is a precious quality that is part of the very nature of Jehovah God. Hundreds of Bible verses associate that quality with Jehovah. In fact, the Bible says that “Holiness belongs to Jehovah.” (Exodus 28:36) What, though, does that lofty quality have to do with us imperfect humans?
7 In his Word, Jehovah tells us: “You must be holy, because I am holy.” (1 Peter 1:16) Yes, we can imitate Jehovah’s holiness; we can be clean before him, maintaining our chastity. So when we refrain from unclean, defiling acts, we are reaching out for a lofty, thrilling privilege—that of reflecting a beautiful trait of the Most High God! (Ephesians 5:1) We should not assume that it is out of our reach to do so, for Jehovah is a wise and reasonable Master who never demands more of us than we are able to do. (Psalm 103:13, 14; James 3:17) Granted, remaining spiritually and morally chaste requires effort. The apostle Paul noted, though, that “sincerity and . . . chastity . . . are due the Christ.” (2 Corinthians 11:3) Do we not owe it to Christ and to his Father to make every effort to keep morally chaste? After all, they have shown us more love than we can ever begin to repay. (John 3:16; 15:13) It is a privilege for us to express our gratitude by living a clean, moral life. By thinking of our chastity in this way, we will value it, safeguarding our heart.

Exodus 28:36, 37
2 In Biblical Hebrew, the word “holy” conveys the thought of separateness. In worship, “holy” applies to that which is separated from common use, or held sacred. Jehovah is holy in the absolute sense. He is called “the Most Holy One.” (Proverbs 9:10; 30:3) In ancient Israel, the high priest wore fastened to his turban a gold plate engraved with the words “Holiness belongs to Jehovah.” (Exodus 28:36, 37) Heavenly cherubs and seraphs stationed about Jehovah’s throne are depicted in the Scriptures as proclaiming: “Holy, holy, holy is Jehovah.” (Isaiah 6:2, 3; Revelation 4:6-8) This repetition emphasizes that Jehovah is holy, clean, and pure to the superlative degree. He is, in fact, the Source of all holiness.
3 Jehovah’s name is sacred, or holy. The psalmist exclaimed: “Let them laud your name. Great and fear-inspiring, holy it is.” (Psalm 99:3) Jesus taught us to pray: “Our Father in the heavens, let your name be sanctified [or, “be held sacred; be treated as holy,” footnote].” (Matthew 6:9) Jesus’ earthly mother, Mary, proclaimed: “My soul magnifies Jehovah . . . the powerful One has done great deeds for me, and holy is his name.” (Luke 1:46, 49) As servants of Jehovah, we hold his name as something holy and avoid doing anything that might bring reproach upon that holy name. Furthermore, we share Jehovah’s view of sacredness, that is, we consider sacred the things that he holds sacred.—Amos 5:14, 15.

Exodus 28:36
11 Could Jehovah simply have forgiven Adam and Eve? Forgiveness was never an option in this case. As perfect humans, Adam and Eve made a deliberate choice to reject Jehovah’s sovereignty and to accept the guidance of Satan instead. Not surprisingly, there was no sign of repentance on the part of the rebels. However, when people ask about forgiveness in the matter, they may actually be wondering why Jehovah did not simply lower his standard and tolerate the existence of sin and rebellion. The answer involves a quality that is essential to Jehovah’s very nature—his holiness.—Exodus 28:36; 39:30.
12 The Bible emphasizes Jehovah’s holiness hundreds of times. Sadly, though, few people in this corrupt world understand that quality. Jehovah is clean, pure, and separate from all sinfulness. (Isaiah 6:3; 59:2) When it comes to sin, he has arranged for a means of atoning for it, wiping it away, but he will not tolerate it forever. If Jehovah were willing to tolerate sin eternally, we would have no hope for the future. (Proverbs 14:12) In his due time, Jehovah will bring all creation back into a state of holiness. That is certain, for it is the will of the Holy One.

Ex 28:39
Garments of Office. Besides wearing linen garments similar to those of the underpriests in his usual activities (Le 16:4), the high priest wore special garments of glory and beauty on certain occasions. Exodus chapters 28 and 39 describe both the design and the making of these garments under the direction of Moses as commanded by God. The innermost garment (except for the linen drawers reaching “from the hips and to the thighs,” worn by all the priests “to cover the naked flesh”; Ex 28:42) was the robe (Heb., kut•to′neth), made of fine (probably white) linen of checkerwork weave. This robe apparently had long sleeves and reached down to the ankles. It was likely woven in one piece. A sash of fine twisted linen woven with blue, reddish purple, and coccus scarlet thread went around the body, probably above the waist.—Ex 28:39; 39:29.
The turban, evidently different from the headdress of the underpriests, was also of fine linen. (Ex 28:39) Fastened to the forefront of the turban was a shining plate of pure gold with the words “Holiness belongs to Jehovah” engraved on it. (Ex 28:36) This plate was called “the holy sign of dedication.”—Ex 29:6; 39:30.

Ex. 28:42, 43
Displaying Dignity in Worship
17 Special attention should be given to displaying dignity when we approach Jehovah in worship. “Guard your feet whenever you go to the house of the true God,” says Ecclesiastes 5:1. Both Moses and Joshua were commanded to remove their sandals when in a holy place. (Ex. 3:5; Josh. 5:15) They were to do this as a gesture of respect or reverence. Israelite priests were obliged to wear linen drawers “to cover the naked flesh.” (Ex. 28:42, 43) This prevented indecent exposure when they served at the altar. Every member of a priest’s family was to uphold the godly standard of dignity.

Ex. 29:5-7
2 Of course, the Jewish shepherds know that “Messiah,” or “Christ,” refers to God’s “Anointed One.” (Ex. 29:5-7) But how can they learn more and convince others that the baby mentioned by the angel will be Jehovah’s appointed Messiah? By examining prophecies found in the Hebrew Scriptures and comparing these with the activities and life course of this child.

Exodus 29:6
2 However, what does “dedication” mean in the Biblical sense? “Dedicate” translates a Hebrew verb that has the meaning “keep separate; be separated; withdraw.” In ancient Israel, High Priest Aaron wore on his turban “the holy sign of dedication,” which was a shining plate of pure gold engraved with the Hebrew words for “Holiness belongs to Jehovah.” That served as a reminder to the high priest that he must avoid doing anything that would profane the sanctuary “because the sign of dedication, the anointing oil of his God, [was] upon him.”—Exodus 29:6; 39:30; Leviticus 21:12.

Ex. 29:38-42
14 Jesus is “the Lamb of God.” (John 1:29, 36) Throughout the Bible, sheep played a notable role in the remission of sin and approach to God. For instance, after Abraham had demonstrated that he was willing to offer his son Isaac, he was told not to harm Isaac and was provided with a ram, or male sheep, as a substitute. (Gen. 22:12, 13) When the Israelites were delivered from Egypt, sheep again played a significant role, this time as part of “Jehovah’s passover.” (Ex. 12:1-13) Further, the Mosaic Law provided for the sacrifice of various animals, including sheep and goats.—Ex. 29:38-42; Lev. 5:6, 7.
15 None of those sacrifices—in fact, no sacrifice offered by humans—could bring permanent release from sin and death. (Heb. 10:1-4) Jesus, on the other hand, is “the Lamb of God that takes away the sin of the world.” This fact alone makes Jesus a treasure that outranks any material treasure that has ever been found. Therefore, we do well to take time to study the subject of the ransom carefully and exercise faith in that marvelous provision. By doing so, we put ourselves in line for a grand blessing and reward—glory and honor with Christ in heaven for the “little flock” and everlasting life in Paradise on earth for the “other sheep.”—Luke 12:32; John 6:40, 47; 10:16.

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Service Meeting


Song 75
15 min: To It All the Nations Will Stream. (Isa. 2:2) Interview two publishers, one who has been in the truth for many years and one who is relatively new. What was it that interested them in the truth? What challenges did they have to overcome? What impressed them the first time they attended a congregation meeting? What do they remember about the first time they shared in the ministry? How did others in the congregation help them to make spiritual progress?
15 min: “Improving Our Skills in the Ministry—Preparing Our Opening Words.” Discussion. Have a brief two-part demonstration. First show an introduction that is not well-thought-out and then one that is well-prepared. Include pertinent points from pages 215-219 of the Ministry School book as time permits.
Song 117 and Prayer

15 min: To It All the Nations Will Stream. (Isa. 2:2)

Interview two publishers, one who has been in the truth for many years and one who is relatively new. What was it that interested them in the truth? What challenges did they have to overcome? What impressed them the first time they attended a congregation meeting? What do they remember about the first time they shared in the ministry? How did others in the congregation help them to make spiritual progress?
^ (Isa. 2:2) In the final part of the days, The mountain of the house of Jehovah Will become firmly established above the top of the mountains, And it will be raised up above the hills, And to it all the nations will stream.

15 min: “Improving Our Skills in the Ministry—Preparing Our Opening Words.”

Discussion. Have a brief two-part demonstration. First show an introduction that is not well-thought-out and then one that is well-prepared. Include pertinent points from pages 215-219 of the Ministry School book as time permits.

IMPROVING OUR SKILLS IN THE MINISTRY—PREPARING OUR OPENING WORDS

Why Important: 

If our introduction does not arouse interest, the householder may terminate the conversation before we can give a witness. Therefore, many publishers consider their opening words to be the most important part of their presentation. Although sample presentations are provided in Our Kingdom Ministry and the Reasoningbook, they do not always include a complete introduction, in order to allow for flexibility. Even if a sample presentation is complete, publishers may choose to alter it or prepare their own. Thus, we will be more effective if we carefully prepare our opening words rather than say whatever comes to mind when the householder opens the door.—Prov. 15:28.

How to Do It:

• Choose your topic. It should be based on the literature you are offering and should be of interest to people in your territory.
• Carefully prepare the first sentence or two that you will say after giving a customary greeting. You might start by saying: “I am here because . . . ,” “Many people are concerned about . . . ,” “I would like to get your opinion on . . . ,” or something else. Short, simple sentences usually work best. Some publishers choose to memorize their introduction.
• Formulate a viewpoint question that will draw the householder into the conversation. (Matt. 17:25) Remember that he was likely thinking about other matters before you arrived, so the question should not be too difficult or put him on the spot.

Try This During the Month:

• Set aside time during family worship to prepare and practice your opening words.
• When in the ministry, share what you plan to say with other publishers. (Prov. 27:17) Change your introduction if it is not effective.

^ (Prov. 15:28) The heart of the righteous one meditates before answering, But the mouth of the wicked blurts out bad things.
^ (Matt. 17:25) He said: “Yes.” However, when he entered the house, Jesus spoke to him first and said: “What do you think, Simon? From whom do the kings of the earth receive duties or head tax? From their sons or from the strangers?”
^ (Prov. 27:17) As iron sharpens iron, So one man sharpens his friend.

^ ***be p. 215-p. 219 Interest-Arousing Introduction***

Study 38

Interest-Arousing Introduction

What do you need to do?

In your opening sentences, say something pertinent that will get the attention of your audience and that will directly contribute to achieving your objective.

Why is it important?

Your introduction may determine whether some people will listen and how attentive they will be.
THE introduction is a crucial part of any talk. If you really arouse the interest of your audience, they will be more inclined to listen intently to what follows. In the field ministry, if your introduction fails to arouse interest, you may not be able to continue your presentation. When you give a talk at the Kingdom Hall, the audience will not walk out on you, but individuals may start thinking about other things if you have not captured their interest.
When preparing your introduction, have in mind the following objectives: (1) getting the attention of your audience, (2) clearly identifying your subject, and (3) showing why the subject is important to your audience. In some instances, these three objectives may be attained almost simultaneously. At times, however, they may be given attention separately, and the order may vary.
How to Get the Attention of Your Audience. The fact that people have gathered to hear a discourse does not mean that they are ready to give the subject their undivided attention. Why not? Their lives are filled with many things that clamor for their attention. They may be concerned about a problem at home or another anxiety of life. The challenge facing you as the speaker is to capture and hold the attention of the audience. There is more than one way that you can do it.
One of the most famous discourses ever given was the Sermon on the Mount. How did it begin? According to Luke’s account, Jesus said: “Happy are you poor, . . . happy are you who hunger now, . . . happy are you who weep now, . . . happy are you whenever men hate you.” (Luke 6:20-22) Why did that arouse interest? In a few words, Jesus acknowledged some of the serious problems that his hearers had to face. Then, instead of discussing the problems at length, he showed that people who had such problems could still be happy, and he did it in a way that made his listeners want to hear more.
Questions can be used effectively to arouse interest, but they must be of the right sort. If your questions indicate that you are simply going to talk about things that the audience has heard before, interest may quickly wane. Do not ask questions that embarrass your audience or that put them in a bad light. Rather, endeavor to phrase your questions in a manner that will stimulate thinking. Pause briefly after each question so that your listeners have time to formulate a mental answer. When they feel that they are engaging in a mental dialogue with you, you have their attention.
Use of a real-life experience is another good way to capture attention. But simply telling a story may defeat your purpose if the experience is embarrassing to someone in your audience. If your story is remembered but the instruction that goes with it is forgotten, you have missed the mark. When an experience is used in the introduction, it should lay the groundwork for some significant aspect of the body of your talk. While some details may be needed in order to make the narrative live, be careful not to make experiences needlessly long.
Some speakers lead with a recent news item, a quotation from a local newspaper, or a statement by a recognized authority. These too can be effective if they really fit the subject and are appropriate for the audience.
If your talk is part of a symposium or a portion of a Service Meeting, then it is usually best to make your introduction brief and to the point. If you are giving a public talk, hold carefully to the time allotted for the introductory section. It is the body of the talk that will convey the information that is of greatest value to your audience.
On occasion you may find yourself speaking before an audience that is skeptical or even hostile. How might you get them to give you their attention? Stephen, an early Christian described as being “full of spirit and wisdom,” was taken by force before the Jewish Sanhedrin. There he gave an eloquent defense of Christianity. How did he begin? In a respectful manner and with a reference to something mutually accepted. “Men, brothers and fathers, hear. The God of glory appeared to our forefather Abraham.” (Acts 6:3; 7:2) On the Areopagus in Athens, the apostle Paul adapted his introduction to a very different audience, saying: “Men of Athens, I behold that in all things you seem to be more given to the fear of the deities than others are.” (Acts 17:22) As a result of effective introductions, both audiences were willing to hear more.
When you are in the field service, you also need to get people’s attention. If your visit is not prearranged, the householder may be busy with other matters. In some parts of the world, uninvited visitors are expected to get to the point quickly. Elsewhere, custom requires that certain formalities be observed before you state the reason for your call.—Luke 10:5.
In either case, genuine friendliness can help to create an atmosphere that is conducive to having a conversation. It is often beneficial to begin with something that directly relates to what is on the person’s mind. How can you determine what to use? Well, when you approached the person, was he engaging in some activity? Perhaps he is farming, caring for the grounds around his house, repairing an automobile, cooking, doing laundry, or caring for children. Was he looking at something—a newspaper or an activity in the street? Do his surroundings reflect special interest in fishing, sports, music, travel, computers, or something else? People are often concerned about what they have recently heard on the radio or seen on television. A question or a brief comment about any of such matters may lead to a friendly conversation.
The occasion when Jesus spoke with a Samaritan woman at a well near Sychar is an outstanding example of how to start a conversation with a view to giving a witness.—John 4:5-26.
You need to prepare your introduction carefully, especially if your congregation works its territory frequently. Otherwise, you may not be able to give a witness.
Identify Your Subject. In the Christian congregation, a chairman or someone preceding you on the program will usually announce the title of your talk and introduce you. However, it can be beneficial for you to remind your audience of your subject during your introductory remarks. This can be, but does not have to be, a formal statement of the theme. In any event, the theme should gradually unfold as the talk progresses. In some way in the introduction, you should focus attention on your subject.
When sending out his disciples to preach, Jesus clearly identified the message that they were to deliver. “As you go, preach, saying, ‘The kingdom of the heavens has drawn near.’” (Matt. 10:7) Regarding our day, Jesus said: “This good news of the kingdom will be preached.” (Matt. 24:14) We are urged to “preach the word,” that is, to stick to the Bible when witnessing. (2 Tim. 4:2) Before opening the Bible or directing attention to the Kingdom, though, it is often necessary to identify some matter that is of current concern. You might comment on crime, unemployment, injustice, war, how to help young people, sickness, or death. But do not dwell at length on negative matters; your message is a positive one. Endeavor to direct the conversation to God’s Word and the Kingdom hope.
Show Why the Subject Is Important to Your Audience. If you will be speaking in the congregation, you can be reasonably sure that those in your audience will in a general way be interested in what you discuss. But will they listen as a person does when he is learning something that definitely involves him? Will they pay attention because they realize that what they are hearing fits their situation in life and because you are stirring in them a desire to do something about it? That will be true only if you considered your audience carefully—their circumstances, their concerns, their attitudes—when preparing your talk. If you did, then include in your introduction something that indicates that.
Whether you are speaking from the platform or witnessing to an individual, one of the best ways to arouse interest in a subject is to get your audience involved. Show how their problems, their needs, or the questions that are on their minds are related to the subject that you are discussing. If you make clear that you are going to go beyond generalities and come to grips with specific aspects of the matter, they will listen even more intently. To do that, you must prepare well.
The Way You Present It. What you say in your introduction is of primary importance, but how you say it can also arouse interest. For this reason your preparation ought to involve not only what you are going to say but also how you are going to say it.
Word choice is important in accomplishing your objective, so you might find it advantageous to prepare the first two or three sentences quite carefully. Short, simple sentences are usually best. For a talk in the congregation, you may want to write them out in your notes, or you may choose to memorize them so that your opening words will carry all the impact they deserve. Delivering an effective introduction in an unhurried manner can help you to gain the composure needed to give the rest of your talk.
When to Prepare It. Opinions vary on this subject. Some experienced speakers believe that preparation of a talk should begin with the introduction. Others who have studied public speaking are of the opinion that the introduction should be prepared after the body has been completed.
You certainly need to know what your subject is and what main points you plan to develop before you can work out the details of a suitable introduction. But what if you are preparing your talk from a published outline? After reading the outline, if you have an idea for the introduction, there is certainly no harm in writing it down. Remember, too, that for your introduction to be effective, you must take into consideration your audience as well as the material in the outline.

HOW TO DO IT

Consider those in your audience—their circumstances, their concerns, their attitudes, what they already know about your subject.
Determine what there is about your subject that will be of particular interest and of value to them.
EXERCISES: (1) Before sharing in the house-to-house ministry, prepare an introduction that fits both the message and some recent event in your territory. (2) Review the opening paragraph of five or six articles in The Watchtower and Awake! Ask yourself what makes each introduction effective.

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Congregation Bible Study


“Draw Close to Jehovah”
cl chap. 7 ¶1-8

SONG 49
Jehovah Is Our Refuge
(Psalm 91)

Paragraph 1
(Deuteronomy 8:15) who caused you to walk through the great and fearsome wilderness, with poisonous serpents and scorpions and with parched ground that has no water. He made water flow out of the flinty rock
Paragraph 2
(Exodus 19:4) ‘You have seen for yourselves what I did to the Egyptians, in order to carry you on wings of eagles and bring you to myself.
Paragraph 3
(Deuteronomy 32:9-11) For Jehovah’s people are his portion; Jacob is his inheritance. 10 He found him in a wilderness land And in an empty, howling desert. He protectively encircled him, took care of him, And safeguarded him as the pupil of his eye. 11 Just as an eagle stirs up its nest, Hovers over its fledglings, Spreading out its wings, taking them, Carrying them on its pinions,
(Psalm 36:7) How precious your loyal love is, O God! In the shadow of your wings, The sons of men take refuge.
Paragraph 4
(Genesis 17:1) When A′bram was 99 years old, Jehovah appeared to A′bram and said to him: “I am God Almighty. Walk before me and prove yourself faultless.
Paragraph 5
(Psalm 46:1) God is our refuge and strength, A help that is readily found in times of distress.
(Titus 1:2) and is based on a hope of the everlasting life that God, who cannot lie, promised long ago;
Paragraph 6
(Psalm 23:1) Jehovah is my Shepherd. I will lack nothing.
(Psalm 100:3) Know that Jehovah is God. He is the one who made us, and we belong to him. We are his people and the sheep of his pasture.
(1 Samuel 17:34, 35) David then said to Saul: “Your servant became a shepherd of his father’s flock, and a lion came, also a bear, and each carried off a sheep from the flock. 35 I went out after it and struck it down and rescued it from its mouth. When it rose up against me, I grabbed it by its fur and struck it down and put it to death.
(John 10:12, 13) The hired man, who is not a shepherd and to whom the sheep do not belong, sees the wolf coming and abandons the sheep and flees—and the wolf snatches them and scatters them— 13 because he is a hired man and does not care for the sheep.
Paragraph 7
(Ezekiel 34:11-16) “‘For this is what the Sovereign Lord Jehovah says: “Here I am, and I myself will search for my sheep, and I will care for them. 12 I will care for my sheep like a shepherd who has found his scattered sheep and is feeding them. I will rescue them from all the places where they were scattered in the day of clouds and thick gloom. 13 I will bring them out from the peoples and collect them together from the lands and bring them into their land and feed them on the mountains of Israel, by the streams and by all the dwelling places of the land. 14 In a good pasture I will feed them, and the land where they graze will be on Israel’s high mountains. They will lie down there in a good grazing land, and they will feed on choice pastures on the mountains of Israel.” 15 “‘“I myself will feed my sheep, and I myself will make them lie down,” declares the Sovereign Lord Jehovah. 16 “The lost one I will search for, the stray I will bring back, the injured I will bandage, and the weak I will strengthen; but the fat one and the strong one I will annihilate. I will feed that one with judgment.”
(Isaiah 40:11) Like a shepherd he will care for his flock. With his arm he will gather together the lambs, And in his bosom he will carry them. He will gently lead those nursing their young.

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“Watchtower” Study


The Watchtower (Study Edition) March 2014

How to Maintain a Positive Viewpoint

“If a man should live many years, let him enjoy them all.”—ECCL. 11:8.

HOW WOULD YOU ANSWER?
• What may make maintaining a positive viewpoint a challenge?
• How can we use the Bible to maintain a positive viewpoint?
• How can the experiences of the needy widow, Elijah, and the writer of Psalm 102 help us to cultivate a positive viewpoint?

(Psalm 144:15) Happy is the people for whom it is this way! Happy is the people whose God is Jehovah!
(John 6:44) No man can come to me unless the Father, who sent me, draws him, and I will resurrect him on the last day.
(Jeremiah 31:3) From far away Jehovah appeared to me and said: “I have loved you with an everlasting love. That is why I have drawn you to me with loyal love.
(2 Corinthians 4:16) Therefore, we do not give up, but even if the man we are outside is wasting away, certainly the man we are inside is being renewed from day to day.
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(Ecclesiastes 11:8) For if a man should live many years, let him enjoy them all. But he should remember that the days of darkness may be many; all that is to come is futility.
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(Psalm 71:9) Do not cast me off in my old age; Do not abandon me when my strength fails.
(Proverbs 13:12) Expectation postponed makes the heart sick, But a desire realized is a tree of life.
(Ecclesiastes 7:7) But oppression can drive the wise one into madness, and a bribe corrupts the heart.
(Jeremiah 17:9) The heart is more treacherous than anything else and is desperate. Who can know it?
(1 John 3:20) regarding whatever our hearts may condemn us in, because God is greater than our hearts and knows all things.
(Job 4:18, 19) Look! He has no faith in his servants, And he finds fault with his angels. 19 How much more so with those dwelling in houses of clay, Whose foundation is in the dust, Who are crushed as easily as a moth!
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(Psalm 23:4) Though I walk in the valley of deep shadow, I fear no harm, For you are with me; Your rod and your staff reassure me.
(2 Corinthians 10:4, 5) For the weapons of our warfare are not fleshly, but powerful by God for overturning strongly entrenched things. 5 For we are overturning reasonings and every lofty thing raised up against the knowledge of God, and we are bringing every thought into captivity to make it obedient to the Christ;
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(2 Corinthians 13:5) Keep testing whether you are in the faith; keep proving what you yourselves are. Or do you not recognize that Jesus Christ is in union with you? Unless you are disapproved.
(James 2:10, 11) For if anyone obeys all the Law but makes a false step in one point, he has become an offender against all of it. 11 For the one who said, “You must not commit adultery,” also said, “You must not murder.” If, now, you do not commit adultery but you do murder, you have become a transgressor of law.
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(Isaiah 55:8, 9) “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, And your ways are not my ways,” declares Jehovah. 9 “For as the heavens are higher than the earth, So my ways are higher than your ways And my thoughts than your thoughts.
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(Luke 21:1-4) 21 Now as he looked up, he saw the rich dropping their gifts into the treasury chests. Then he saw a needy widow drop in two small coins of very little value, 3 and he said: “Truly I say to you that this poor widow put in more than they all did. 4 For all of these put in gifts out of their surplus, but she, out of her want, put in all the means of living she had.”
(Luke 20:47) and who devour the houses of the widows and for show make long prayers. These will receive a more severe judgment.”
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(1 Kings 19:4) He went a day’s journey into the wilderness and came and sat down under a broom tree, and he asked that he might die. He said: “It is enough! Now, O Jehovah, take my life away, for I am no better than my forefathers.”
(Job 6:3) For now it is heavier than the sands of the seas. That is why my words have been wild talk.
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(1 Kings 18:37-40) Answer me, O Jehovah! Answer me so that this people may know that you, Jehovah, are the true God and that you are turning their hearts back to you.” 38 At that the fire of Jehovah fell from above and consumed the burnt offering, the pieces of wood, the stones, and the dust, and it licked up the water from the trench. 39 When all the people saw it, they immediately fell facedown and said: “Jehovah is the true God! Jehovah is the true God!” 40 Then E•li′jah said to them: “Seize the prophets of Ba′al! Do not let a single one of them escape!” At once they seized them, and E•li′jah brought them down to the stream of Ki′shon and slaughtered them there.
(1 Kings 19:2-4) At that Jez′e•bel sent a messenger to E•li′jah, saying: “So may the gods do to me and add to it if by this time tomorrow I do not make you like each one of them!” 3 At that he became afraid, so he got up and ran for his life. He came to Be′er-she′ba, which belongs to Judah, and he left his attendant there. 4 He went a day’s journey into the wilderness and came and sat down under a broom tree, and he asked that he might die. He said: “It is enough! Now, O Jehovah, take my life away, for I am no better than my forefathers.”
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(1 Kings 19:5-8) Then he lay down and fell asleep under the broom tree. But suddenly an angel touched him and said to him: “Get up and eat.” 6 When he looked, there at his head was a round loaf on heated stones and a jug of water. He ate and drank and lay down again. 7 Later the angel of Jehovah came back a second time and touched him and said: “Get up and eat, for the journey will be too much for you.” 8 So he got up and ate and drank, and in the strength of that nourishment he went on for 40 days and 40 nights until he reached Ho′reb, the mountain of the true God.
(1 Kings 19:15-19) Jehovah said to him: “Return, and go to the wilderness of Damascus. When you arrive, anoint Haz′a•el as king over Syria. 16 And you should anoint Je′hu the grandson of Nim′shi as king over Israel, and you should anoint E•li′sha the son of Sha′phat from A′bel-me•ho′lah as prophet to take your place. 17 Anyone escaping from Haz′a•el’s sword, Je′hu will put to death; and anyone escaping from Je′hu’s sword, E•li′sha will put to death. 18 And I still have left 7,000 in Israel, all whose knees have not bent down to Ba′al and whose mouths have not kissed him.” 19 So he went from there and found E•li′sha the son of Sha′phat while he was plowing with 12 pairs of bulls ahead of him, and he was with the 12th pair. So E•li′jah went over to him and threw his official garment on him.
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(Galatians 6:2) Go on carrying the burdens of one another, and in this way you will fulfill the law of the Christ.
(Psalms 121:1, 2) 121 I raise my eyes to the mountains. From where will my help come? My help comes from Jehovah, The Maker of heaven and earth.
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(Romans 14:4) Who are you to judge the servant of another? To his own master he stands or falls. Indeed, he will be made to stand, for Jehovah can make him stand.
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(Jeremiah 20:11) But Jehovah was with me like a fearsome warrior. That is why those persecuting me will stumble and will not prevail. They will be put to great shame, for they will not succeed. Their everlasting humiliation will not be forgotten.
(Matthew 25:23) His master said to him: ‘Well done, good and faithful slave! You were faithful over a few things. I will appoint you over many things. Enter into the joy of your master.’
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(Psalms 102:1-28) 102 O Jehovah, hear my prayer; Let my cry for help reach you. 2 Do not hide your face from me in my time of distress. Incline your ear to me; Do answer me quickly when I call. 3 For my days are vanishing like smoke, And my bones are charred like a fireplace. 4 My heart has been struck down like grass and has withered, For I forget to eat my food. 5 Because of my loud groaning, My bones cling to my flesh. 6 I resemble the pelican of the wilderness; I am like a little owl among the ruins. 7 I lie awake; I am like a solitary bird on a roof. 8 All day long my enemies taunt me. Those who mock me use my name as a curse. 9 For I eat ashes as my bread, And my drink is mingled with tears, 10 Because of your anger and your indignation, For you lifted me up only to cast me aside. 11 My days are like a fading shadow, And I am withering like grass. 12 But you remain forever, O Jehovah, And your fame will endure for all generations. 13 Surely you will rise up and show mercy on Zion, For it is time to show her your favor; The appointed time has come. 14 For your servants find pleasure in her stones And have affection even for her dust. 15 The nations will fear the name of Jehovah, And all the kings of the earth your glory. 16 For Jehovah will rebuild Zion; He will appear in his glory. 17 He will pay attention to the prayer of the destitute; He will not despise their prayer. 18 This is written for the future generation, So that a people yet to be brought forth will praise Jah. 19 For he looks down from his holy height, From the heavens Jehovah views the earth, 20 To hear the sighing of the prisoner, To release those sentenced to death, 21 So that the name of Jehovah will be declared in Zion And his praise in Jerusalem, 22 When the peoples and kingdoms Gather together to serve Jehovah. 23 He prematurely robbed me of my strength; He cut short my days. 24 I said: “O my God, Do not do away with me in the middle of my life, You whose years span all generations. 25 Long ago you laid the foundations of the earth, And the heavens are the work of your hands. 26 They will perish, but you will remain; Just like a garment they will all wear out. Just like clothing you will replace them, and they will pass away. 27 But you are the same, and your years will never end. 28 The children of your servants will dwell securely, And their offspring will be firmly established before you.”
(Psalms 102:1-28) 102 O Jehovah, hear my prayer; Let my cry for help reach you. 2 Do not hide your face from me in my time of distress. Incline your ear to me; Do answer me quickly when I call. 3 For my days are vanishing like smoke, And my bones are charred like a fireplace. 4 My heart has been struck down like grass and has withered, For I forget to eat my food. 5 Because of my loud groaning, My bones cling to my flesh. 6 I resemble the pelican of the wilderness; I am like a little owl among the ruins. 7 I lie awake; I am like a solitary bird on a roof. 8 All day long my enemies taunt me. Those who mock me use my name as a curse. 9 For I eat ashes as my bread, And my drink is mingled with tears, 10 Because of your anger and your indignation, For you lifted me up only to cast me aside. 11 My days are like a fading shadow, And I am withering like grass. 12 But you remain forever, O Jehovah, And your fame will endure for all generations. 13 Surely you will rise up and show mercy on Zion, For it is time to show her your favor; The appointed time has come. 14 For your servants find pleasure in her stones And have affection even for her dust. 15 The nations will fear the name of Jehovah, And all the kings of the earth your glory. 16 For Jehovah will rebuild Zion; He will appear in his glory. 17 He will pay attention to the prayer of the destitute; He will not despise their prayer. 18 This is written for the future generation, So that a people yet to be brought forth will praise Jah. 19 For he looks down from his holy height, From the heavens Jehovah views the earth, 20 To hear the sighing of the prisoner, To release those sentenced to death, 21 So that the name of Jehovah will be declared in Zion And his praise in Jerusalem, 22 When the peoples and kingdoms Gather together to serve Jehovah. 23 He prematurely robbed me of my strength; He cut short my days. 24 I said: “O my God, Do not do away with me in the middle of my life, You whose years span all generations. 25 Long ago you laid the foundations of the earth, And the heavens are the work of your hands. 26 They will perish, but you will remain; Just like a garment they will all wear out. Just like clothing you will replace them, and they will pass away. 27 But you are the same, and your years will never end. 28 The children of your servants will dwell securely, And their offspring will be firmly established before you.”
(Psalms 102:3, 4) For my days are vanishing like smoke, And my bones are charred like a fireplace. 4 My heart has been struck down like grass and has withered, For I forget to eat my food.
(Psalm 102:6) I resemble the pelican of the wilderness; I am like a little owl among the ruins.
(Psalm 102:11) My days are like a fading shadow, And I am withering like grass.
(Psalm 102:10) Because of your anger and your indignation, For you lifted me up only to cast me aside.
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(Psalms 102:19-21) For he looks down from his holy height, From the heavens Jehovah views the earth, 20 To hear the sighing of the prisoner, To release those sentenced to death, 21 So that the name of Jehovah will be declared in Zion And his praise in Jerusalem,
(Psalms 102:1-28) 102 O Jehovah, hear my prayer; Let my cry for help reach you. 2 Do not hide your face from me in my time of distress. Incline your ear to me; Do answer me quickly when I call. 3 For my days are vanishing like smoke, And my bones are charred like a fireplace. 4 My heart has been struck down like grass and has withered, For I forget to eat my food. 5 Because of my loud groaning, My bones cling to my flesh. 6 I resemble the pelican of the wilderness; I am like a little owl among the ruins. 7 I lie awake; I am like a solitary bird on a roof. 8 All day long my enemies taunt me. Those who mock me use my name as a curse. 9 For I eat ashes as my bread, And my drink is mingled with tears, 10 Because of your anger and your indignation, For you lifted me up only to cast me aside. 11 My days are like a fading shadow, And I am withering like grass. 12 But you remain forever, O Jehovah, And your fame will endure for all generations. 13 Surely you will rise up and show mercy on Zion, For it is time to show her your favor; The appointed time has come. 14 For your servants find pleasure in her stones And have affection even for her dust. 15 The nations will fear the name of Jehovah, And all the kings of the earth your glory. 16 For Jehovah will rebuild Zion; He will appear in his glory. 17 He will pay attention to the prayer of the destitute; He will not despise their prayer. 18 This is written for the future generation, So that a people yet to be brought forth will praise Jah. 19 For he looks down from his holy height, From the heavens Jehovah views the earth, 20 To hear the sighing of the prisoner, To release those sentenced to death, 21 So that the name of Jehovah will be declared in Zion And his praise in Jerusalem, 22 When the peoples and kingdoms Gather together to serve Jehovah. 23 He prematurely robbed me of my strength; He cut short my days. 24 I said: “O my God, Do not do away with me in the middle of my life, You whose years span all generations. 25 Long ago you laid the foundations of the earth, And the heavens are the work of your hands. 26 They will perish, but you will remain; Just like a garment they will all wear out. Just like clothing you will replace them, and they will pass away. 27 But you are the same, and your years will never end. 28 The children of your servants will dwell securely, And their offspring will be firmly established before you.”
(Psalm 102:7) I lie awake; I am like a solitary bird on a roof.
(Psalm 102:17) He will pay attention to the prayer of the destitute; He will not despise their prayer.
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(Psalms 102:1-28) 102 O Jehovah, hear my prayer; Let my cry for help reach you. 2 Do not hide your face from me in my time of distress. Incline your ear to me; Do answer me quickly when I call. 3 For my days are vanishing like smoke, And my bones are charred like a fireplace. 4 My heart has been struck down like grass and has withered, For I forget to eat my food. 5 Because of my loud groaning, My bones cling to my flesh. 6 I resemble the pelican of the wilderness; I am like a little owl among the ruins. 7 I lie awake; I am like a solitary bird on a roof. 8 All day long my enemies taunt me. Those who mock me use my name as a curse. 9 For I eat ashes as my bread, And my drink is mingled with tears, 10 Because of your anger and your indignation, For you lifted me up only to cast me aside. 11 My days are like a fading shadow, And I am withering like grass. 12 But you remain forever, O Jehovah, And your fame will endure for all generations. 13 Surely you will rise up and show mercy on Zion, For it is time to show her your favor; The appointed time has come. 14 For your servants find pleasure in her stones And have affection even for her dust. 15 The nations will fear the name of Jehovah, And all the kings of the earth your glory. 16 For Jehovah will rebuild Zion; He will appear in his glory. 17 He will pay attention to the prayer of the destitute; He will not despise their prayer. 18 This is written for the future generation, So that a people yet to be brought forth will praise Jah. 19 For he looks down from his holy height, From the heavens Jehovah views the earth, 20 To hear the sighing of the prisoner, To release those sentenced to death, 21 So that the name of Jehovah will be declared in Zion And his praise in Jerusalem, 22 When the peoples and kingdoms Gather together to serve Jehovah. 23 He prematurely robbed me of my strength; He cut short my days. 24 I said: “O my God, Do not do away with me in the middle of my life, You whose years span all generations. 25 Long ago you laid the foundations of the earth, And the heavens are the work of your hands. 26 They will perish, but you will remain; Just like a garment they will all wear out. Just like clothing you will replace them, and they will pass away. 27 But you are the same, and your years will never end. 28 The children of your servants will dwell securely, And their offspring will be firmly established before you.”
(Psalm 102:12) But you remain forever, O Jehovah, And your fame will endure for all generations.
(Psalm 102:27) But you are the same, and your years will never end.
(Psalms 102:20, 21) To hear the sighing of the prisoner, To release those sentenced to death, 21 So that the name of Jehovah will be declared in Zion And his praise in Jerusalem,
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(Matthew 24:13) But the one who has endured to the end will be saved.

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References consulted on: Watchtower Library 2013

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